Terkel or Terkiel? Help with two matzevos #poland


David Shapiro
 

When writing non-Hebrew names in Hebrew documents (and a matzeva is called a document for this) there are halachic rules for spelling the vowels. An 'ayin' represents a soft 'e' (a segol) for Ashkenazim (Sefarim have different rules of spelling). There is only a minor difference in the pronunciation of the names in the two pictures. In the left picture there is an 'e' sound between the 'k' and the 'l'. In the right picture the sound between those two letters is slurred.

David Shapiro
Jerusalem


Odeda Zlotnick
 

The "e"in Yiddish is the equivanlet of both "e" 's in the word "equivanlent".  In Hebrew it's a consonant.  In Yiddish, a vowel.
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Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


Bob Silverstein
 

I am working on the Terkel family from Krynki, Poland.  The American branch spells it Terkel while the Uruguayan one uses Terkiel.  In the attached matzevos, you see the two spellings.  Are they both right or what?  Are they both pronounced the same so the extra i or ayin is silent?  Can anyone look these up in Beider?  I would like to see what he has.

This is the family of Studs Terkel.

Thanks for the help.
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Bob Silverstein
bobsilverstein@...
Elk Grove Village, IL

Researching Kaplan (Krynki, Poland) Tzipershteyn (Logishin, Pinsk, Belarus), Friedson/Fridzon (Pinsk, Cuba, Massachusetts), Israel and Goodman (Mishnitz, Warsaw, Manchester).