Two Different Hebrew Given Names or Wrong Person? #names #belarus


Brad Rubin
 

I found a birth record from 1882 in Belarus, written in both Russian and Yiddish, that I thought matched my great-grandfather.  The birth date generally matches other records.  The mother’s name (Shifra) generally matches other records (Sara/Soufia/Soufra). 
 
Numerous other records and headstones show his father’s given name is Meshulem Feivish.  I assume Meshulem is his Hebrew name and Feivish is his Yiddish name.  The Russian translation of the birth record gives the father’s name as Fayvish Movshov Rubenchik.  However, the Yiddish part of the record refers to him as Yosef Feivish son of Moshe Rubentzik.  This is the only record I’ve seen that uses the name Yosef.  Is there some connection between the given names Meshulem and Yosef?  Is it possible for someone to have two Hebrew names, one that appears in a birth record and another used everywhere else?  Or, does this suggest that despite all the other matching information, I have the wrong person?  — Brad Rubin
 


Odeda Zlotnick
 

I don't agree with "Yosef".  In many of these documents. the word following "the father" referred to the place the father was from.
It looks like "from Minsk" to me.  
There's an unexpected flourish at the end of Minsk -- but I still think it's Minsk.  it would help if you were to upload the whole document so we could see other records in Hebrew from this page.  (it's Hebrew, not Yiddish)
--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


Brad Rubin
 


Interesting!  Here is the source to the image (record M502) within all the other records in the collection.  -- Brad Rubin

https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSMW-YHS8?i=148


Odeda Zlotnick
 

Thanks Brad,
I've looked at a number of records, and I have no doubt: it's "From Minsk".
This is what it looks like on threee records, one on the same page, another on the previous. 

    those little squished characters on the right are a typical way of writing the Hebrew letter  מ which appears twice in the Hebrew text "From Minsk" the first  is the pronoun indicating "from". 

 

 


and this, by coincidence, from the following page in the link happens to be Yossef   


You've got the right person, from Minsk.
--
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.