Scandals, Shandehs, and Lies:The Stories Families Don't Tell #announcements #events


Marguerite Kealey
 

Sunday February 13, 2022

1-3 pm PT

Zoom Meeting

Scandals, Shandehs, and Lies

by

Renee Steinig

In the course of decades of genealogical research Renee Steinig has uncovered many a "skeleton in the closet" — cases of mental illness, illegitimate birth, infidelity, abandonment, and even murder, all hushed up for decades. She will share with us these family secrets, the research tools that uncovered them and the reunions and reconciliations that followed many of her discoveries.        

Renee Steinig began to do genealogical research in the 1970s  Many family trees and some 18 years later, she began to accept client work.  Her specialties include New York research, locating lost family, and due diligence for probate cases.  She is a member of the Association of Professional Genealogists and has testified as an expert witness in several New York Surrogate’s Courts.  A past president and longtime trustee of the JGS of Long Island, Renee is also a director of Gesher Galicia and serves as its discussion group moderator and Family Finder editor. 

In order to register for the presentations, go to our website Welcome to the San Diego Jewish Genealogy Website (sdjgs.org) and follow the registration directions.                 
 
This is a free event for members         Non-members: We ask for a small donation ($5

Marguerite Kealey
San Diego Jewish Genealogical Society--Publicity Chair 
San Diego County, CA

 


jbonline1111@...
 

I'm sure this will be interesting, but as a mental health clinician, I beg of you not to consider mental illness a "skeleton in the closet," a term which perpetuates the stigma against those who live with mental illness.  For our ancestors, particularly, living with a mental illness was a nightmare. There were few effective treatments and little understanding of the brain disorders that are part of mental illness.  We are in the toddler stage of treatment now, with a long way to go.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Renee Steinig
 

Hi Barbara,

As the speaker, I fully agree. In my talk, I refer to mental illness as a "skeleton in the closet" not because it should have been, but because, sadly, it was. The two cases I discuss are heartbreaking and no doubt treatment would be far different today.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

On Sat, Jan 22, 2022 at 2:50 PM <jbonline1111@...> wrote:
I'm sure this will be interesting, but as a mental health clinician, I beg of you not to consider mental illness a "skeleton in the closet," a term which perpetuates the stigma against those who live with mental illness.  For our ancestors, particularly, living with a mental illness was a nightmare. There were few effective treatments and little understanding of the brain disorders that are part of mental illness.  We are in the toddler stage of treatment now, with a long way to go.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC
._,_._,_


kshepard
 

Having a child out of wedlock was a scandal too back then, now it is much more accepted.

Kathleen Shepard
On Saturday, January 22, 2022, 03:06:28 PM CST, Renee Steinig <genmaven@...> wrote:


Hi Barbara,

As the speaker, I fully agree. In my talk, I refer to mental illness as a "skeleton in the closet" not because it should have been, but because, sadly, it was. The two cases I discuss are heartbreaking and no doubt treatment would be far different today.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

On Sat, Jan 22, 2022 at 2:50 PM <jbonline1111@...> wrote:
I'm sure this will be interesting, but as a mental health clinician, I beg of you not to consider mental illness a "skeleton in the closet," a term which perpetuates the stigma against those who live with mental illness.  For our ancestors, particularly, living with a mental illness was a nightmare. There were few effective treatments and little understanding of the brain disorders that are part of mental illness.  We are in the toddler stage of treatment now, with a long way to go.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC
._,_._,_


Roberta Apte
 

When I was growing up my grandmother always told me that she had five sisters. "All girls," she would tell me. In researching her family I found a senses from 1920 and 1930. The 1920 census shows a male child as the youngest in the household. As I researched him, I found him in a mental institution on Long Island. I don't know how long he was there because there doesn't seem to be records. I did find him in the 1950s, living by himself. My mother didn't even know about him. This is just one of my family secrets that I've uncovered through genealogy research.

I often wonder how my great-grandparents were able to commit him. I wonder if he truly had a mental health condition, or if maybe he was gay and they couldn't accept it. So many things at that time were considered mental illness that would not be today. My great-grandfather was very religious and my great uncle might have been rebellious or had a learning disability. Who knows?--
Roberta Slome Apte