Max Bruch. Who wrote the music for Kol Nidre was NOT Jewish #general


Seth Jacobson
 

Hi Larry,

The following link should shed some light on your issue:
http://www.chazzanut.com/bruch.html

Seth Jacobson
Jerusalem


estelle
 

I don't know about Bruch, but I know that Naftaii Hertz Imber, who wrote the words to our treasured  Hatikvah, although Jewish, was an unkempt drunk.   

After my grandmother was widowed in 1900, at first she supported herself and three little boys by serving Kosher  dinners  in the parlor of the Lower East Side tenement the rented to single men who arrived before their families.  She served Imber every night, gratis, of course.  My father remembered that when he was a very young boy, Imber, not in very good shape, would wander around  the room reciting Yiddish poems, his or others.  He thought  that would pay for his meal.    He died young from liver ailments.

Estelle Guttman #7805
Reston, VA


Larry Gaum
 

Let me clarify so that there is no confusion.
Yes, Max Bruch wrote his classical piece Kol Nidre which was based on the Aramaic/Hebrew liturgical prayer Kol Nidre and it’s melody.
However, it was based on the Ashkenazic version of the Kol Nidre, not the Sephardic.
Bruch took the music and adapted it for musical instruments. He created a written musical score.
Thanks to all who contributed to the discussion, in the group and privately.
Larry Gaum
Toronto


Larry Gaum
 

The Kol Nidre prayer, initially written in Aramaic was chanted centuries ago. It was not sung with the melody we are familiar with today in Ashkenazic synagogues. Sephardic synagogue chanting is completely different.
Larry Gaum


Yossi Jalas
 

Hello Larry,

You can take it easy.... Max Bruch only composed a classical work for Cello based on the much older Ashkenazi Kol Nidrei melody.

Where the original Ashkenazi melody actually originated from is a very sticky subject and I don't think there's any consensus.

Yossi Jalas
USA


Alan Cohen
 

Bruch didn't write the music for Kol Nidre. He wrote a piece of classical music based on the traditional music for Kol Nidre.

Alan Cohen

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Peter Lebensold
 

Careful: If word gets around that the song White Christmas was written by a Jew (son of a cantor, no less) and that at least one of the performers who sang the song in the finale of the film was also Jewish, there could be all sorts of confusion. Never mind Felix Mendelssohn!  😉

Peter Lebensold
Toronto


Odeda Zlotnick
 

I think you may have got some garbled information...
Max Bruch composed his Adagio on 2 Hebrew Melodies for Cello and Orchestra with Harp based  Kol Nidrei.  No way he wrote the music "for" Kol Nidrei.  The tune was sung in Ashkenazi communities centuries before Max Bruch was born.

For those who'd like to hear it, here's a link to Bruch's composition as played by Mischa Maisky
Bruch: Kol Nidrei ∙ hr-Sinfonieorchester ∙ Mischa Maisky ∙ Paavo Järvi - YouTube
-- 
Odeda Zlotnick
Jerusalem, Israel.


Susan Lauscher
 

As a cellist, your inquiry stood out for me.  I've never seen any information about any Jewish ancestors.  Here's what the ClassicFM website has to say:
Kol Nidrei, his warm and richly evocative work for cello and orchestra, was one of the first pieces he set about composing when he took up his post as Principal Conductor of the Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. It was composed specifically for Liverpool’s Jewish community, taking as its inspiration two traditional Hebrew melodies. The first, heard at the outset, originates from the traditional Jewish service on the night of Yom Kippur; the second is an extract from a musical setting of the Byron poem ‘Those that Wept on Babel’s stream’.
A common misconception about Bruch is that he was a Jewish composer. He was in fact a Protestant Christian – but he was greatly inspired by Old Testament stories and by his own modern-day friendships with a number of prominent Jewish musicians.

Susan Lauscher
Northglenn, CO




Larry Gaum
 

I have been shocked by many events over the many years of my life but nothing equals the one I felt when I discovery that Max Bruch, who wrote the music for the Kol Nidre, the most sacred of Jewish prayers, was not Jewish.
He was in fact Protestant, and born in Germany.
On many occasions, the story goes, he vehemently denied he was Jewish and in some reports was said to have uttered statements that were considered to be anti semitic.
After I regained my composure, I looked further into his name. Nothing sounder more Jewish than BRUCH, as In Baruch or Brochas.
My question to my fellow readers is:
Do you think that Bruch or his ancestors were Jewish at one time. This wouldn’t surprise me as we have see this happen before.
When I attend the next Arev Yom Kippur , I might feel a bit different. Maybe not. But I won’t be in the same frame of mind.
Best to all
Larry Gaum
Toronto