U.K. birth registrations #unitedkingdom


Our Jewish Family History Research
 

Hi all:
My question relates specifically to birth registrations in the early 1900s in England.
I have often seen different maiden names and sometimes different given names for the same mother on her multiple childrens' birth registrations. Would an older child have been allowed to register their sibling's birth? Was there a minimum age required to register the birth? Many thanks in advance.
Best,
Jacqueline GRUSZECKI
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Researching GRUSZECKI/GRUSZECKA,
Warsaw, Poland

  






lesleyedwards@...
 

It is quite common for different spellings and versions of maiden names and surnames to be given on birth certificates in the UK.  My own Grandmother has at least 2 different first names and 5 variations of her maiden name on her childrens birth certificates.  When the person giving the information was illiterate as with my Russian Grandparents and many others then the sound of their names would be spelled in the best way the person recording the data could manage - hence possibly quite wide variations.

Lesley Edwards
Cheshire, England


David Leboff
 

Agreed but these variations can be quite marked!  My great grandmother's maiden name was recorded on her children's birth records (according to the GRO) as Bolstein, Berman, Beirman, Zuisman, Pertasnic, Puttanic and Partasic!

David Leboff
Wembley, England

Researching Leboff (Visnevo, Belarus), Zarzecki (Suwalki district, Poland), Wielodruz (Plock district, Poland), Audyt (Plock district, Poland)


Jill Whitehead
 

Some first names could be double names and so either of the double names could be given e.g. Rachel Leah was given in my family as Rachel Leah, Rachel, Leah, and as an anglicization Lily. Names were quite fluid in the past unlike now. My great grandmother was known as Hadassah, Basha and Bertha (and sometimes Betsy). Surnames could also be changed at will and could be subject to many spellings e.g. Rubenstein and Berenstein were interchangeable (they mean the same thing red stone). And also the patronymic could be used instead of or as well as the given surname so my great grandmother Bertha (as above)  gave her birth surname as Plottnovsky (spelt many different ways) but also as Jacobs (her father's name) on several of her 12 children's birth records. During WW1, foreign sounding surnames were commonly Anglicized - my Guttenbergs became Graham legally by Deed Poll, but other more informal changes were made such as Abrahams to Abrams. Patronyms are things to look out for - for many years I could not find the death record for my great aunt Leah Servian Goldblatt when she died of typhoid in N. Wales in the early 1890s - her death had been registered as Leah Max, Mordecai or Max being her grandfather's name. You need to think outside the box.

Jill Whitehead nee Servian (Serwianski), Surrey, UK 
 


l.a.m.buisman@...
 

Looks like two different surnames, variants due to what it may have sounded to the civil servant. Was one of those "maiden names" maybe the name of a former husband?

My husbands gt grandmother (maiden name B) had many children, first 6 or so with her husband F (who disappeared? No records to be found since the end of 19th century. After that, maybe still married to husband F? she lives with N who she has another 6 or so of children with. N was definitely still officially married to his first wife. Every child she registered as F, formerly B. The children with N with father unknown.
One exception: she gave birth in hospital to twins. Informant for these births was hospital staff. Mother was N formerly B  and the father was N. Afterwards it was amended and the name F appeared again.
She definitely lived as mrs N, even her son Walter F was Walter N in his WWI service-records. But when mrs N died, the death was registered as that of mrs F. Her children with N  went through life with surname N. Their descendants had problems finding birthcertificats.

btw, they were not jewish, but english/irish Roman Catholics in Salford and Manchester area, England. So no complications with  varying first names.

Loes Buisman,
Amsterdam


jeremy frankel
 

My favourite story on this theme concerns my Frankel great grandfather, who was the informant when recording the births of all ten of his children in London. He proffered to the registration clerk that his wife’s maiden name was (variously): Bitfornik, Damond, Vitfornik (twice), Bornstein (thrice), Bernstein (thrice). These latter six were actually close variations of his wife’s mother’s maiden name!


Jeremy G Frankel
formerly Edgware, Middlesex, England
now Sacramento, California, USA

Searching for:
FRANKEL/FRENKEL/FRENKIEL: Gombin, Poland; London, England
GOLDRATH/GOLD: Praszka, Poland; London, England
KOENIGSBERG: Vilkaviskis, Lithuania; London, England; NY, USA
LEVY (later LEADER): Kalisz, Poland; London, England
PINKUS, Poland; London, England
PRINCZ/PRINCE: Krakow, Poland; London, England


slevin0715@...
 

I don't think this issue is limited to the UK. I have seen instances of this many times in large families in the US as well. 

Sheryl Levin
Voorhees, New Jersey, USA


Our Jewish Family History Research
 

Thank you for these members' valuable replies. Following up, please share the steps you took to work through these brickwalls. I believe that it would be helpful to many members. We appreciate learning from other members.

Best,
Jacqueline GRUSZECKI


Researching GRUSZECKI/GRUSZECKA
from Warsaw


lesleyedwards@...
 

All my Grandmother's 11 children born in England between 1910 and 1927 were born at home.  I have compiled a list of addresses they lived in from census returns of 1911, 1921 and Street directories(especially if they had an occupation at the same address), birth, marriage and death certificates etc.  Hopefully, unlike my maternal Grandparents they won't have moved 5 times!  Then to find missing birth registrations I have found that less information put in a search is often more useful when using the General Record Office  or Ancestry to get hold of birth certificates.  Using the option of variations on surnames and approximations of similar sounding names and a wide + or - of years will draw up lists of births and the address of birth is helpful in eliminating non relatives.  I have only once purchased a wrong birth certificate where the mother's maiden name was very similar, the area of birth similar and I had convinced myself that giving my Grandfather's name as Lewis Garfinkle instead of Joseph was just an error of communication.  However, the address of the birth was incorrect and it later proved to be a non relative!  The more unusual the surname makes research easier - I feel sorry for all those looking for Cohens and Levys!
Lesley Edwards
Cheshire, England


l.a.m.buisman@...
 

My brick wall started crumbling by the 1901 Census, searching for a Mary Jane without surname born in India. I found her with surname N, with son Walter N, both the right ages and places of birth, the son already working at the railways.

Loes Buisman,
Amsterdam