NY Times Obit Look-up (Dates not in Newspapers.com) #usa


Sherri Bobish
 

Hello 'Genners,
 
Could someone with access to The NY Times archive look for two obits?  It appears that Newspapers.com only has The NY Times through 1922.

Frank SCHWARTZ, d. 04/19/1966  (April 19th may be the DOD or the date of burial.)

Florence SCHWARTZ, d. 
08/27/1985 (Aug. 27th may be the DOD or the date of burial.)

I do know that Frank & Florence are at Riverside Cem. in Saddle Brook, NJ.   Getting photos of their tombstones will be my next step since no photos are online in either JOWBR, JewishData.com, FindAGrave, or BillionGraves.

My goal is to ascertain if this is the Frank & Florence SCHWARTZ that I am searching, and hopefully learn the name of Florence's father.  My Florence SCHWARTZ' maiden name was supposedly WEINER.

Thank you,

Sherri Bobish

Searching:
RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala, Lith.)
LEFFENFELD / FINK / KALTER (Daliowa & Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA / BLEIWEISS (Tarnow & Tarnobrzeg, Pol.)
WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.)
SOLON / SOLAN / SOKOLSKY (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / BLUMENKRANZ / APPEL (Odessa?)


Barbara Ellman
 

Sherri,

Neither had death notices in the NY Times

--
Barbara Ellman

--
Barbara Ellman
Secaucus NJ USA
HASSMAN, SONENTHAL, DAUERMAN, LUCHS - Drohobycz, Ukraine
HIRSCHHORN, GOLDSTEIN, BUCHWALD - Dolyna, Ukraine
ELLMAN, COIRA, MAIDMAN - Minkovtsy, Ukraine
KAGLE, FASS - Ulanow, Poland


mab@...
 

I found the attached death notice for Frank, but did not find anything for Florence.
--
Miriam Alexander Baker


jbonline1111@...
 

Did you check the Library of Congress newspapers archive?  That may be another route to looking for the obituary. I would also try legacy.com, etc. 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


casmith24@...
 

Looked in Ancestry's obits collection and can find nothing for either Frank or Florence ...
--
Catherine Arnott Smith
Stoughton, Wisconsin, USA


EdrieAnne Broughton
 

Several years ago, when I was going regularly to LDS Family History Centers to look at microfilmed records I found that when the church filmed newspaper obits they had a certain amount of funds to film each newspaper.  They started in January and filmed until the funds ran out.  The newspaper I was interested in, at the time, was the Oakland Tribune.  Most years that I looked at film for, ended each microfilm about July, with a few ending in September.  The same was true for the San Jose Mercury and News.  Then Ancestry began their newspaper collection which covered even fewer editions.  So some newspapers were never filmed, some dates were never filmed and some were never picked up by the different newspaper archives.  Most of the obits I successfully found were searched by date then, manually covering each date in the range around the death date.  Many obits were published in a tinier font than the rest of the newspaper and those were more poorly indexed by the indexers of the papers.  My advice is to figure out;
 1. Which newspaper was likely to have the obit (mostly where the children of the deceased lived)   2. When an obit was likely then manually search to see if that date and paper are included in the raw LDS newspaper microfilm collections.
 3.  Look into other collectors of newspaper archives and find who has archived them. (Like the San Jose Mercury news microfilms are held at the library on the edge of the university in San Jose.  The late Henry Snyder, a professor at UC Riverside was attempting to find out who held California newspaper archives and make that information available.  Most of these newspapers have never been indexed for easy searching.  Sorry this is a bit long but most people just starting to search newspapers don't understand why a single obit might be hard to find.
EdrieAnne Broughton, Vacaville, CA 


Erika Gottfried
 

The Proquest Historical Newspapers database has the New York Times pretty much up through the present day (it also includes the LA Times, Washington Post, and most of the main newspapers for major American cities as well as a collection of Black newspapers).  It's an extremely useful source, but a very expensive subscription, so large universities' libraries are often the only ones who can offer it, and their users are usually limited to the institution's students.  However, if one is an alumni or retired staff of such a university and has an alumni/retiree email address, one can sometimes have access to the college libraries' online subscriptions.   That's a possible path to be taken to getting access to this invaluable resource. 
--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey


Diane Jacobs
 

I believe that large public libraries also have 
Proquest and they can be visited and possibly accessed online.

Diane Jacobs
Researching Sinko / Shinke , Wender from Lithuania 



On Apr 5, 2022, at 2:08 AM, Erika Gottfried <erikagottfried53@...> wrote:

The Proquest Historical Newspapers database has the New York Times pretty much up through the present day (it also includes the LA Times, Washington Post, and most of the main newspapers for major American cities as well as a collection of Black newspapers).  It's an extremely useful source, but a very expensive subscription, so large universities' libraries are often the only ones who can offer it, and their users are usually limited to the institution's students.  However, if one is an alumni or retired staff of such a university and has an alumni/retiree email address, one can sometimes have access to the college libraries' online subscriptions.   That's a possible path to be taken to getting access to this invaluable resource. 
--
Erika Gottfried
Teaneck, New Jersey

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


EdrieAnne Broughton
 

ProQuest also suffers for the late in the year gaps in newspaper coverage.  I used the service at my local library extensively for census searches because back a few years ago their search engine was different than Ancestry's and I could search for a person in the census with a bunch of different options...like when I searched for Serrings when they showed up with many different spellings and often were indexed with a capital Ell rather than capital S due to differences in cursive handwriting.  This is a good hint for those of you with names starting with capital letters that depend on who taught the enumerator to write cursive way back in grammar school.  Also Heritage Quest has newspapers too, often smaller papers with smaller year spans.  It's a paid service but you can get onto it from your home computer.  
 
EdrieAnne Broughton, Vacaville, California


casmith24@...
 

I'm a professor who teaches grad students in an information school (library science, information science, etc.) and regularly teach my students about newspaper access -- I'm attaching a tip sheet some folks might find helpful.

Yes, libraries are the genealogist's friend! Not just public libraries, either. A publicly supported college or university provides access to community members, and this includes access to its library, in which you can search databases. But even private universities typically allow people in.

Because of database licensing contract terms, in both public and private university settings, it is necessary to visit the physical library to search at a terminal inside the building; remote access is not typically possible. However, university libraries typically have more databases than a public library does, so it’s usually worth the trip! 

--
Catherine Arnott Smith
Stoughton, Wisconsin, USA