What Uniform is Wolfbear ABRAHAMS Wearing? #general


Stuart Wayne
 

My great- grandfather Wolfbear Abrahams, born 1855 in Russo-Poland and living in London England from the 1880s on, is pictured here in an unidentified uniform.  Can anyone identify the uniform and/or the shoulder patches?



Many thanks,
Stuart Wayne


serhiy1999@...
 


Dear colleagues!
It seems Wolfbear Abrahams is in the russian (obviously infantry) uniform of the 1870-ies (the period somewhere of the russian-Turkish war of 1877-1878). The elements on his shoulders denote that he is a military musician (the drummer). 
Regards,
Igor Holyboroda,
Lviv-Lwow-Lemberg, Ukraine.


Frank Szmulowicz
 

Here is a uniform of the Austro-Hungarian army.
Frank Szmulowicz


rroth@...
 

I know nothing about the uniform but congratulations on the title of your post, one of the most attention-getting of the past year at least. 
It would probably work pretty well with any first name, but "Wolfbear" is the icing on the cake.
Please tell us there is a descendant now in day care named Wolfbear. : )
--

==========
Robert Roth
Kingston, NY
rroth@...


Helen Gottesman
 

Check out uniformology.com. experts

 

--

Helen Gottesman

Boca Raton, Florida

Searching Schwarz Roding Germany
Dobrin,Davidsohn,Segall. Lublinski in Bukofzer Tuchel/Tuchola  Poland/West Prussia
Greenhut/Grunhut Germany, Bohemia/Czechlovakia
Bukofzer, Zempelburg, West prussia/Poland


Stuart Wayne
 

Thanks, Robert but it was unintentional!  Wolfbear, often shortened to Wolf, is a common name in my own genealogy, right down to my own father who was William in English.  I would be curious to know if it really is unusual as I grew up with it and may be too close to the question.

Stuart Wayne


On Tue, Apr 12, 2022 at 8:43 AM <rroth@...> wrote:
I know nothing about the uniform but congratulations on the title of your post, one of the most attention-getting of the past year at least. 
It would probably work pretty well with any first name, but "Wolfbear" is the icing on the cake.
Please tell us there is a descendant now in day care named Wolfbear. : )
--

==========
Robert Roth
Kingston, NY
rroth@...
_._,_._,_


Abramselaine@...
 

My great-uncle and my 3xgreat grandfather were named Wolf Tuchman. They were from Staszow, Poland. My great-uncle emigrated to Ontario, Canada (Toronto and Simcoe) where he changed his name to William.  

Elaine Abrams
Berkofsky/Berkowski-Belarus
Teper/Rubinovitz/Shuster-Lithuania
Tuchman/Silberstein-Poland
Abrams-Russia(?)/Germany(?)/Estonia(?)to Ontario, Canada


rroth@...
 

Everyone in the West has heard of Wolfgang because of Mozart, but I can only say that I have never come across Wolfbear before. Good, though.
--

==========
Robert Roth
Kingston, NY
rroth@...


Jay Paul
 

Some mention was made earlier of the unusual nature of the given name "Wolfbear." I would imagine that "Wolfbear" is nothing more than an idiosyncratic contraction of the double name "Wolf Ber," which I believe was not an uncommon double name in Poland (according to Alexander Beider's Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names).
Jay
--
Jay Paul, PhD
San Francisco CA 94117
Researching: SUMBERG (Pilvishok/Pilviskiai, Lithuania), LANGERT (Pilviskiai & elsewhere in Suwalki gubernia); KAHN (Ranstadt, Germany), GOTTLIEB (Grebenau, Germany), PAVLOVSKIY / PAVLOVSKY (Mala Antonivka, Bila Tserkiv, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia, Ukraine), LEVITSKIY / LEVITZSKY (Yasnohorodka, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia), KOTLER (Vistytis, Suwalki gubernia), WOLF (Austro-Hungary).


Stuart Wayne
 

Thank you, Jay, and thanks to everyone who responded to my original post!  I not only got an answer to the uniform question I posted but an education on a name that I admit has puzzled me.  While "Wolfbear" does appear in my family history a number of times, I'm not sure whether it is shown as such in official documents or not - gotta check that out!

It seems very reasonable to me that oral transmission of history could blend the two names, Wolf and Ber, into one.

Thanks again,all,
Stuart Wayne


On Wed, Apr 13, 2022 at 1:46 PM Jay Paul <jaypaulphd@...> wrote:
Some mention was made earlier of the unusual nature of the given name "Wolfbear." I would imagine that "Wolfbear" is nothing more than an idiosyncratic contraction of the double name "Wolf Ber," which I believe was not an uncommon double name in Poland (according to Alexander Beider's Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names).
Jay
--
Jay Paul, PhD
San Francisco CA 94117
Researching: SUMBERG (Pilvishok/Pilviskiai, Lithuania), LANGERT (Pilviskiai & elsewhere in Suwalki gubernia); KAHN (Ranstadt, Germany), GOTTLIEB (Grebenau, Germany), PAVLOVSKIY / PAVLOVSKY (Mala Antonivka, Bila Tserkiv, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia, Ukraine), LEVITSKIY / LEVITZSKY (Yasnohorodka, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia), KOTLER (Vistytis, Suwalki gubernia), WOLF (Austro-Hungary).


Alan Cohen
 

Surely the reason no one has heard the name Wolfbear before is because it is likely to be a misreading of the names Wolf (Heb: Ze'ev) and Ber (Heb: Dov). So his real name was Wolf Ber Abrahams.

Alan Cohen

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Eva Lawrence
 

My own belief is that the name Wolfbear was actually spelled Wolfbert,
an regular German name, and the final t got lost in oral tradition,
That would account for the long 'bear' sound.
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


mpipik
 

Jay Paul,  I agree.

Jewish.gen has quite a few pages about Jewish names.   A Google (etc) search for "Jewish given names" will provide some of the links to the pages.

And also for those who have yet to encounter it, there was a nickname (diminutive) for Wolf too: Velvel (little wolf).   So you might have seen the same person referred to as Volf, Zev or Ze'ev, Volf-Zev or Velvel. 

Have fun!

Jessica Schein
NYC