Dolgoselia, 8 miles from Olevsk #ukraine


csicher@...
 

According to my aunt, interviewed 40 years ago, she and her siblings were born in a tiny village named Dolgoselia, which is Ukrainian for "long village." They gave Olevsk as their birthplace on immigration documents, since it was the nearest known town. Is there any way of further tracing Dolgoselia?
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Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA


csicher@...
 

Edward David Luft just now replied to my earlier query with this information:
I suggest that you look at a copy of the 11 + 1 volume Vasmer, Max, Russisches Geographisches Namenbuchhttps://www.worldcat.org/title/russisches-geographisches-namenbuch/oclc/2075630  The names of the locations are mostly in Cyrillic letters with explanations in German so you may have to find someone to help you read the relevant entries if you know neither the Cyrillic alphabet nor the German language.  However, you should be able to plug information into a translator, such as GoogleTranslate or Babelfish, to help you.  This resource is far better, in my opinion, than anything available online.  The series of volumes lists absolutely all locations that ever existed in the Russian Empire or in the Soviet Union to 1962 when Vasmer died.  The location will be listed whether or not it still existed in 1962.

These volumes are very expensive so you will want to consult them in a library near you.  Since you are in Oakland, California, you can find copies of the relevant volumes at UC Berkeley Libraries, Berkeley, CA 94720.  That is only 5 miles from you.  Stanford University Libraries hold copies, but the library is 26 miles from you.

Please also see my articles on the subject.  Many libraries hold copies of Avotaynu, first published in Teaneck, New Jersey.  Gen Dobry! is only online. Rodziny is also in many libraries.  Ask a reference librarian in your local library for any help that you need for any of the other listed sources.

1.  “Using Max Vasmer’s Russisches geographisches Namenbuch to Find Locations in the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union,” Gen Dobry!, Volume XVI, No. 1, 31 January 2015, pp. 2-6.  The article was reprinted with emendations in Rodziny:  Journal of the Polish Genealogical Society of America, Chicago, Illinois, Spring 2015, Vol. 38, No. 2, pp. 9-13.  [CS49.P64].  Reprinted by the Polish Genealogical Society of Connecticut and the Northeast at https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=891507844269
900&id=175145372572821 Reprinted in Facebook at  https://www.facebook.
com/permalink.php?story_fbid=801043563317506&id=171275172961018/.  Supplemented in “Letters to the Editor,” Gen Dobry!, Vol. XVI, No. 4, April 2015, pp. 3-4.  Further commented upon at http://news2.nemoweb.net/?Jid=BLU179-W94CBCA4D213201DF0185EFC40D0@...

2.  “Updates on sources by Kendler and Vasmer,” Gen Dobry!, Volume XVI, No. 4, 30 April 2015, p.  3.  See comment by Luft in “Letters to the Editor,” Gen  Dobry!, Volume XVI, No. 4, 30 April 2015, pp. 3-4 and at  http://news2.nemo
web.net/?Jid=BLU179-W94CBCA4D213201DF0185EFC40D0@...  See the Facebook note at  https://business.facebook.com/JewishGen.org/posts/
1029059357116219/.

3.  “Additional Resources to Locate Ancestral Towns in Eastern and Central Europe,” Avotaynu:  The International Review of Jewish Genealogy, Teaneck, New Jersey, Vol. XXXVII, No. 1, Spring 2021, p. 67.  Discusses works by Kendler and Vasmer, as well as the booklet, “European Rates of Fare” and online access to each, when available.

I plan to look at the work he lists at the UC/Berkeley library. If anyone has additional suggestions, I'd be glad to know. Thank you!
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Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA


Sherri Bobish
 

Hi Carol,

The JewishGen Gazetteer
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/LocTown.asp
finds a place called Dolgosel’ye by using a soundex search.

Dolgosel’ye populated place 51°10' N 27°30' E G Ukraine 141.1 miles WNW of Kyyiv 50°26' N 30°31' E

Olevsk is 7.7 miles ENE of Dolgosel’ye
7.7 miles ENE of 51°10' N 27°30' E

This JewishGen page has info on Olevsk:
https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-1049236

The JewishGen Unified Database gets 344 hits on town Olevsk.
https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/all/
 
Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish

Searching:
RATOWSKY / CHAIMSON (Ariogala, Lith.)
LEFFENFELD / FINK / KALTER (Daliowa & Jasliska, Pol.)
BOJDA / BLEIWEISS (Tarnow & Tarnobrzeg, Pol.)
WALTZMAN / WALZMAN (Ustrzyki Dolne, Pol.)
LEVY (Tyrawa Woloska, Pol.)
SOLON / SOLAN / SOKOLSKY (Grodek, Bialystok, Pol.)
BOBISH / BLUMENKRANZ / APPEL / WEINER / ROSENBERG (Vysoko-Litovsk, Brest, Biala Podlaska)


csicher@...
 

Thank you, Sherri. Igor Holyboroda, an expert living in Ukraine, tells me that despite JewishGen's "populated place," Dolgosel'ye doesn't exist as a separate entity. It seems to have been absorbed by Kam'yanka. My hunch is that it was--and perhaps still is--a place to its inhabitants but was never an administratively recognized place.
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Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA


csicher@...
 

Thanks to yet another helpful suggestion, I requested help from the maps division of the Library of Congress: Geography and Map Division <maps@....  A reply came within days, attaching three topographical maps that showed Dolgosel'ya in relation to the nearest town, Man'yanka, and confirming the accuracy of its name, which means "long village."

Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA


Hap Ponedel
 

Carol,

I specialize in maps and geo-location of towns and villages on historical maps, many of which come from the Library of Congress collection. Dolgosel'ye was easy to find given what was shared above. Here is a screenshot of the place on a Russian military topographic map from 1914:


The number below Dolgoselia represents the number of dwellings present when the military mappers first entered the village taking down their information about the place. This image, published in 1914, is probably at least several years after that event, maybe even a decade. 

The path from the village to Olevsk was circuitous and as you say, NE by several miles. Here is a link to the Dolgoselia section. And here is a link to the Olevsk section.  You will find Olevsk in the upper left hand corner of the map. Both of these map images came from the LoC collection.


We do not have large scale Latin alphabet maps of western Russia, or they are rare to find and came from the German military. Coverage is spotty at best. There is evidence, on the Olevsk section, of a Jewish cemetery which I can point out if you are interested.

It is my hope that Sherri and others will refer me or my website when questions like this come up. I am eager to help people find these places, far off in time and space, where Jewish life was once lived.

Best regards,
Hap Ponedel
Eugene, OR
http://easteurotopo.org/
hapsky@...
easteurotopo@...


csicher@...
 

This is fantastic! One of those little rectangles is probably my family's house. Your website is an amazing resource. I'll be able to find other locations, like Bakwitz in Prussia. Thank you so much!
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Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA


csicher@...
 

Just to add that there are other sources, via JewishGen, for photos of Olevsk and the cemetery.
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Carol Sicherman
Oakland,CA