Alternate locations for an Orthodox wedding/marriage ceremony in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania #usa


Marcia Segal
 

Greetings,

One set of my grandparents, both with families in Philadelphia, were married in the rabbi's office rather than in the main sanctuary (not sure if that's what the primary area of worship was called). Would there have been a precedent, or reason? There seems to be correspondence about when to have the wedding in the office, as opposed to why. Money wouldn't have been the issue, and one of my relatives has suggested that getting married in the rabbi's office was more customary than I would have thought. Any ideas? And FYI, she wasn't pregnant--the first child was born more than a year after they were married (and I have documentation for both dates).

Many thanks for kind insights.

Sincerely,
Marcia Segal
(family names Caplan/Kaplan, Gomborov/Gomborow, Koppelman, Mergler, Segal, Siegel, Yankelovich)


Shlomo Katz
 

In fact, getting married in a Shul (synagogue) is a relatively new (i.e., 19th century) innovation and was disapproved of by many rabbis who viewed it as being influenced by the Christian concept of a church wedding. Traditionally, Jewish weddings were conducted outdoors weather permitting.

Sources to rabbinic works available on request.

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring MD


Sally Bruckheimer
 

"married in the rabbi's office rather than in the main sanctuary (not sure if that's what the primary area of worship was called). Would there have been a precedent, or reason? "

My mother said she got married in a blue suit - I don't know where, but it wasn't a big wedding, and money wasn't the issue. The issue was that WW II was raging in Europe (and the US wasn't in it yet, but soon), and a big todo wasn't proper. 

Perhaps your grandparents married near or during a war?  Or Covid-19? Or Spanish flu?

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Sherri Bobish
 


Marcia,

My parents married in the rabbi's office.  This was in Brooklyn right before my Father went to The U.S. Army at the start of WW11.  After the ceremony they had a small party at my maternal grandparent's apartment.  They didn't even have any music because my paternal grandfather had recently passed away, and my maternal grandfather said music would not be appropriate.

As far as I can tell, large weddings (for most people) did not become common until the 1950's in The U.S. As with everything, I'm sure there were exceptions.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


Dan Nussbaum
 

My in-laws were married in the Rabbi's office because my mother-in-law's father had recently died. It also happened to be in Philadelphia, but I think it was a Conservative synagogue.

Daniel Nussbaum II, M.D., FAAP
Retired Developmental Pediatrician
Rochester, New York
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Molly Staub
 

If you can provide the bride's residence, it might help some of us native Philadelphians to pinpoint relevant synagogues. I myself was married by a Conservative rabbi who had officiated at my parents' wedding. My uncle was also president of the synagogue.

Good luck, Moly

Molly Arost Staub
M. A. in Journalism
Boca Raton, FL

Searching in Ukraine for BERENSON, GRAFFMAN, MENDELSON, KISBERG


Molly Staub
 

If you can provide the bride's residence, it might help some of us native Philadelphians to pinpoint relevant synagogues. I myself was married by a Conservative rabbi who had officiated at my parents' wedding. My uncle was also president of the synagogue.

Good luck, Moly

Molly Arost Staub
M. A. in Journalism
Boca Raton, FL

Searching in Ukraine for BERENSON, GRAFFMAN, MENDELSON, KISBERG