Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? #names


sjgwed@...
 

"Muni" or "Munya" are the first names for someone (a lawyer) from Skalat. The last name is Lempert or Lampert - which are my family names. They are written in the Skalat Memorial Book, which was published recently, by JewishGen. 

Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? 

Susan Gordon
LEMPERT, SCHOENHAUT - Skalat
BIALAZURKEr - Zbaraz


Mark Halpern
 

I have Galician cousins with names Muni and Manio, whose given names were either Munis or Munisch. They were born in Tarnopol and Brzezany, but their great grandfather was born in Skalat. 

I found the following on the JewishGen site. Although it relates to a towns formerly in the Russian Empire, it provides Hebrew given names of Manishe, Manasha, Manush, Manish, Monashe, Munish, Manish, Manish, Manish, Monash, Monash, Munish, Manas.

Male Given Names
Hebrew and Russian and their Transliterations
from the Kremenets Vital Records and Revision Lists

See Page 27 of https://kehilalinks.jewishgen.org/Kremenets/web-pages/documents/images-from-vr/Given-Names-male-Hebrew-and-Russian-graphics.PDF

Mark Halpern

 

On 2021-04-07 1:01 pm, sjgwed via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:

"Muni" or "Munya" are the first names for someone (a lawyer) from Skalat. The last name is Lempert or Lampert - which are my family names. They are written in the Skalat Memorial Book, which was published recently, by JewishGen. 

Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? 

Susan Gordon
LEMPERT, SCHOENHAUT - Skalat
BIALAZURKEr - Zbaraz


Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff
 

Myself having known a man from Galicia with the nickname "Muni," I just looked him up to see whether I could determine whether "Muni" was a colloquial form of some Yiddish middle name added to his main given name "Yisroel/Israel."


A My Heritage note entered next to the given name, "Israel" (Yisroel), of this energetic, handsome man whom I met several times and who had been a very close teenage friend of my late father-in-law, might give a hint of one possibility of the name "Muni" in Galicia.

They both grew up in Zabootiv, Ukraine. (At that time, Sniatyn, Galicia, Austrio-Hungarian Empire).
and they both had the given name "Yisroel."

They were both huge soccer fans and played a lot of soccer together as young men.

The "Muni" we knew would have been born a few years before 1920, since he was a few years older than my father-in-law.

The two "Yisroels" had an unanticipated, emotional reunion, in the late 1940s in Minnesota. There is a local newspaper article about that reunion. I'll try to track it down it down and post it. Maybe it has mention of his nickname's origin.

The person in charge of his My Heritage record writes that the name "Muni" is taken from that of "a Czech footballer."

So if our Muni had that nickname prior to WWII, it should be possible to research who the famous "Muni" Czech soccer player was.

There is also the possibility that he assumed the nickname "Muni" after WWII in England. If so, we can look for the "Muni" soccer player during that period. By the time he came to the U.S. after marrying in England, he was informally known as "Muni."


Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff
ezyroff@...

On Wednesday, April 7, 2021, 10:33:46 AM PDT, sjgwed via groups.jewishgen.org <sjgwed=aol.com@...> wrote:


"Muni" or "Munya" are the first names for someone (a lawyer) from Skalat. The last name is Lempert or Lampert - which are my family names. They are written in the Skalat Memorial Book, which was published recently, by JewishGen. 

Are "Muni" and "Munya" nicknames? For what name? 

Susan Gordon
LEMPERT, SCHOENHAUT - Skalat
BIALAZURKEr - Zbaraz

--
ZOLOTOROV (Chernigov, Ukraine; Kiev, Ukraine);
SLOTOROFF (Kiev, Ukraine)
CHARKOVSKY or SHARKOVSKY(Ukraine);
LEVINE (Ukraine and Minsk, Belarus);
GLUSKIN (Ukraine)
LIMON (Berestechko, Volynia, Ukraine)
TESLER (Horochiv, Volynia, Ukraine)
ZYRO (Zabolativ, Ukraine) 
TAU (Zalolativ, Ukraine)
PISTERMAN (Ukraine)
ROTH / ROT (Ataki, Bessarabia, Moldova)
BLAUSTEIN (Chernigov, Ukraine or Minsk, Belarus)


Gary Gershfield
 

Munya was the name of my paternal great- grandfather.His full name was Munya Meir Gershfeld. I have seen it also spelled Munia and Monia. 
 
My paternal ancestors came from the village of Druzhkopol, which was located in the Volhynia gubernia in present day Ukraine.
 
Gary
 
Gary Gershfield
 
Forest Hills,NY


mvayser@...
 

Alexander Beider's reference lists Shloyme as the full name for Munya and Mun'ka.

Mike Vayser


Jules Levin
 

It seems to me that the logical name would be Menachem, which is a
popular Chabad name and could be added as a secondary name to honor someone.

Jules Levin,

Los Angeles


On 4/7/2021 6:08 PM, Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Myself having known a man from Galicia with the nickname "Muni," I
just looked him up to see whether I could determine whether "Muni" was
a colloquial form of some Yiddish middle name added to his main given
name "Yisroel/Israel."




Mary Clare
 

The famous actor Paul Muni, in his personal life, went by the nickname Muni or Munya. His real name was Meshilem Weisenfreund, and his family was from Galicia.

Mary Clare
Austin, TX


Linda Cantor
 

I had the opportunity at a genealogy conference years ago to ask the late Shmuel Gorr (author of Jewish Personal Names) about Manes, my grandfather's name.  He told me that it was a nickname or  diminutive for Menachem.

Linda Cantor
NYC


Trudy Greener
 

My Russian first cousin was Munya, and I understood that it was short for Emanuel... 

Trudy (Litt) Greener, Jerusalem  (Litvak and Naiman families from Chimerovitz, Ukraine)


Chana Bonn
 

The only Munya I ever knew was also an Emanuel. 

Chana Bonn, Philadelphia 


Rick Luftglass
 

From everyone’s responses here, it sounds like Muni and Munya were often males. Interesting that my Munya/Munia/Muni, was a female - my great aunt.  She was born in 1885 in Bogopol, in the Podolia region in today’s Ukraine, and moved to Montreal. Her formal first name was Anna.

But perhaps that was an anomaly. 

Rick Luftglass


NTalbot
 

I also had a female first 2X cousin Muna Neger from Dynow. I am not aware of Muna being a nickname for another name. Sadly she was shot by a Nazi holding her twin baby girls, also killed.
--
NTalbot
Brooklyn, NY
ninaitalbot@...

NEGER, SPINRAD (Dynow, Poland)
TOLPEN (Suchostaw, Poland/Sukhostav, Ukraine)
DISTENFELD, ADLER, WILDER (Kamionka Strumilowa, Poland/Kamianka-Buzka, Ukraine)


mamabirdlouise@...
 

Munya and Muni are diminutives of Emmanuel; they may be for other names, as well.  The late father of a friend was called "Muni" and his name was Emmanuel.
--
Louise Goldstein

 


hfark29@...
 

Muni in our family was a nickname for Shimon.....(in Israel.)
Heidi Farkash 


Gary
 

I've been following this discussion with some interest as one of my great-grandmothers apparently had a sister named Manya (or Mani). I've been wondering if that's a variant of Muni/Munya. Or perhaps it's the same and the person who translated my ggm's letters wrote "a" instead of "u".

Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY


Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff
 

The female name that is phonetically "Manya" is the first name of my husband's paternal grandmother, who lived in Galicia.

We, too, do not know what the origin of the name is and have wondered about it, since we thought it did not seem to resonate as a Jewish name.

Autosomal DNA testing does confirm, however, that three of her grandchildren, who are children of two of her male children, are categorized by the DNA vendors as Ashkenazi Jews at a very high percentage.

Ellen Zyroff


On Friday, April 9, 2021, 12:36:42 PM PDT, Gary via groups.jewishgen.org <electromd=verizon.net@...> wrote:


I've been following this discussion with some interest as one of my great-grandmothers apparently had a sister named Manya (or Mani). I've been wondering if that's a variant of Muni/Munya. Or perhaps it's the same and the person who translated my ggm's letters wrote "a" instead of "u".

Gary

--
Gary Ehrlich
Rockville, MD
SCVIRSCI, Zhivotov, Ukraine; WASHLIKOVSKY/WASHALKOWSKY, SATER, Bialystock, Poland;
LIFSHITS/LIFSHITZ, GOROVITZ, HOROVITZ, Lvov, Ukraine; Ufa and Moscow, Russia
YAGUDA, Albany, NY

--
ZOLOTOROV (Chernigov, Ukraine; Kiev, Ukraine);
SLOTOROFF (Kiev, Ukraine)
CHARKOVSKY or SHARKOVSKY(Ukraine);
LEVINE (Ukraine and Minsk, Belarus);
GLUSKIN (Ukraine)
LIMON (Berestechko, Volynia, Ukraine)
TESLER (Horochiv, Volynia, Ukraine)
ZYRO (Zabolativ, Ukraine) 
TAU (Zalolativ, Ukraine)
PISTERMAN (Ukraine)
ROTH / ROT (Ataki, Bessarabia, Moldova)
BLAUSTEIN (Chernigov, Ukraine or Minsk, Belarus)


mvayser@...
 

Manya is a nickname for Maria in Russian and Ukrainian and possibly some other Slavic languages.  It's likely that the full name was Mariem, Maria, or similar.

Mike Vayser


Lee Jaffe
 

I've been following the exchange with a lot of interest because it touches the identities of three relatives I'm trying to trace. 

I have two mystery relatives listed in the family tree passed on to me, siblings of my great-grandmother Dora Koshkin, one a sister, Mayna and the other a brother, Munya.  The Koshkins came from Snovsk, Chernigov, Ukraine.  Most of the family emigrated in the early 1900s but, as far as I know, neither Mayna and Munya came to the US.  I have no records or documents of their lives and for awhile wondered if they were actually one person whose name was transcribed incorrectly in the family tree.  I've since found family photos with Munya and Mayna labeled separately.  :-)

I also have a 2x great-grandfather whose name is recorded as Manis on his son's marriage license and מאניש on the same son's gravestone.  The son, my great-grandfather Joseph Schwartz, is listed on a couple of other family trees where it says his father's name was Emanuel.  A number of posts in this thread suggest that Manis is a derivative of Emanuel but I've always assumed that it was the other way around: that Emanuel was a Westernized rendering of whatever Manis stood for, probably Menachem. I don't know where Manis or Joseph came from but my best guess, at the moment, is Ternivka, Ukraine.

Lee

--

Lee David Jaffe

Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod, Poland ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzman?, Schwarzstein?) / ? ;  Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland

 


stalactit@...
 

Hello,

My maternal grandmother’s official name was Maria Solomonovna  PRITIKINA  (Russian spelling: Мария Соломоновна Притыкина) 1903-1974 from Oster, Ukraine. But everybody called her Mania ( Manya, Маня). I wouldn’t know how her father was nicknamed but she named one of her son’s Solomon, after him and everybody called him Monia or Mon’ka (Monya, Моня, Монька)
--
Jane DOROGOYER

Researching 
LANDSMAN from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus;
SHEININ from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus, Kyiv, Russia;
PRITIKIN from Oster, Ukraine;
KRONFELD from Bessarabia;
DOROGOYER from Bessarabia.


Jules Levin
 

On 4/11/2021 5:41 AM, stalactit via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Hello,

My maternal grandmother’s official name was Maria Solomonovna
 PRITIKINA  (Russian spelling: Мария Соломоновна Притыкина) 1903-1974
from Oster, Ukraine. But everybody called her Mania ( Manya, Маня). I
wouldn’t know how her father was nicknamed but she named one of her
son’s Solomon, after him and everybody called him Monia or Mon’ka
(Monya, Моня, Монька)
--
Jane DOROGOYER

Researching
LANDSMAN from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus;
SHEININ from Gomel, Mogilev, Belarus, Kyiv, Russia;
PRITIKIN from Oster, Ukraine;
KRONFELD from Bessarabia;
DOROGOYER from Bessarabia.