British census terms #unitedkingdom


John Anderson
 

What might be the difference between these terms in the 1891 English census (London)--LODGER and BOARDER? This person's household had 3 lodgers and 2 boarders.

John Anderson,
Orlando, FL


Diane Jacobs
 

Perhaps one got bed and food while the other just had a bed.

Diane Jacobs


On Jan 11, 2022, at 10:22 AM, John Anderson <counselor12721@...> wrote:

What might be the difference between these terms in the 1891 English census (London)--LODGER and BOARDER? This person's household had 3 lodgers and 2 boarders.

John Anderson,
Orlando, FL

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


David Harrison <djh_119@...>
 

Dear Diane and John
I do not know what the difference was in 1891 but I do know the difference today which has seemed unchanged for the last 70 years of my life.  I am now aged 90. We have through this period always had the term "Board and Lodging".
The implication is simple that lodging is that you have the use of the building with furniture.  Whilst board includes the supply of food and possibly washing of bedding and clothing.  Might I suggest that the ages should also be of use, and could show that lodgers were (all) of working age whilst boarders were children, aged or maybe infirm.  In between these two comes bed and breakfast where you are provided with furniture and cleaning and just the one meal and get the other food from restaurants or cook it yourself.  Another possibility might be that a Lodger is a family member from out of town being aided whilst away from home though Boarders are there and pay as a significant part of the family income of the family owning the premises.  The Lodger may be fed at work or just be using that place as a base for working in a wide area and not wish to have to return for a meal.   Certainly on walking holidays you find and use these differences for difference needs of accommodation.
David Harrison
Birmingham, England,
  


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Diane Jacobs <geniediane@...>
Sent: 11 January 2022 16:02
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] British census terms #unitedkingdom
 
Perhaps one got bed and food while the other just had a bed.

Diane Jacobs


On Jan 11, 2022, at 10:22 AM, John Anderson <counselor12721@...> wrote:

What might be the difference between these terms in the 1891 English census (London)--LODGER and BOARDER? This person's household had 3 lodgers and 2 boarders.

John Anderson,
Orlando, FL

--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Caroline Gurney
 

According to Edward Higgs' book A Clearer Sense of the Census (HMSO, London, 1996), pages 66-68, the distinction was between boarders, who took their meals at the same table as the family, and lodgers, who lived in the same house as the family but took their meals separately. 

--
Caroline Gurney
Portishead, UK


ntc52@...
 

Caroline's comment makes sense to me. As a matter of interest I have just looked at the cover instructions for completing the 1921 census. This  instructs that persons occupying separate lodgings in a house or a separate part of the house will be regarded as forming a separate household. But boarders are to be regarded as part of the household with which they board.  Noreen Thorne Bedfordshire, England