Child of holocaust survivors seeks to obtain Polish citizenship #poland #general


Ken Frankel
 

My wife's parents (holocaust survivors) were born in Poland ~1912 and ~1920. She wants to obtain Polish citizenship. Does anyone have experience using Lexmotion for this purpose? 
 
Thank you.
Ken Frankel
Berkeley, California USA 
 


David Cherson
 

Ken,
I had enough trouble trying to understand why Jews seek German citizenship (yes my late wife was a child of German Jews), but seeking Polish citizenship just boggles my mind.  I can at least credit Germany for trying to combat their anti-semitism and racism but I can find nothing good to say about Poland, particularly the government that is in power and a good portion of it's population.  Oh I understand the principle, her parents had a right to citizenship and it was taken away, etc.  But it really disappoints me that there isn't an equal desire to make aliyah and gain Israeli citizenship.  Just because you might not like the government and the society doesn't fit your desired mold is no reason.  By becoming a citizen you can help change those things more than you can from the outside.

David Cherson


Erica Fox Zabusky
 

I, too, am interested in Polish citizenship (through my grandparents, unfortunately no birth certificates). Years ago I started looking into it, and there was a Polish woman in Australia (I think) who you could hire. I hadn't heard of Lexmotion until now, so I'm interested to see if others post. As for Mr. Cherson's comments, the main reason for many people obtaining citizenship of a Central European country is to gain acces to residency and employment in any EU country. And as Mr. Cherson points out, "Just because you might not like the government and the society doesn't fit your desired mold is no reason.  By becoming a citizen you can help change those things more than you can from the outside." So obtaining Polish citizenship would enable you to participate in helping to make changes there.
--
Erica Fox Zabusky
ZABUSKI - Czestochowa, Sochaczew
FRYDMANN - Sochaczew
BRAUN, PANKOWSKI - Czestochowa
FIKSEL, RUDMAN - Izaslav, Slavuta, Odessa, Kharkov
POLISZUK, GOLDMAN - Izaslav, Slavuta


David Cherson
 

Unfortunately I was referring to Israel when I mentioned change, etc.  Good luck to you on changing Poland and Europe in general.  And why gain EU citizenship when you have US citizenship.  Despite current problems this country is far preferable to Europe.  Well I'm not going to argue this anymore as I can see that some people are suffering from idealism.  And regards to idealism a colleague of mine many years ago told me that idealism is the basis of fascism (no you aren't fascists he was describing what he saw as the basis for that movement)

David Cherson


Ian Charles
 

Erica: I'm also interested. Others will be far more knowledgeable but I have the understanding that when Poland was absorbed into Russia and the Austro-Hungarian Empire before reacquiring statehood after WW1, things get a little complicated. I was informed that Poland wasn't very interested that my grandfather was born in Krakow in 1884, but the Austrians weren't interested either in citizens born in parts of the empire that disappeared in 1919! I did complete a quick survey for one of the firms claiming to offer assistance and they got back saying no-go. They may have been mistaken but at least it was an honest reply because my greater fear was they would take money when there was no chance of success. I think the EU passport thing has some appeal, but I also like the idea of reclaiming something that was taken away from my family, even if in practical terms it doesn't make any real difference to my life

--
Ian Charles
London, UK


arnold friedman
 

hi,

it can be done takes bout 6 months for citizen and about a year for a pssport.    my parents were both survivors from radom poland.   i did not want it, but my kids wanted it for eu travel and in case they ever wanted to work in the eu.   poland is one of the easiest countries because if you have one  grandfather or in many cases one grandmother you can qualify. so i did notbhave to get it for my kids to get it.  my son has his passport and my daughter is getting hers next month.    the fees per person with a consultant are about 2k  or 3k for 2 with the same bloodline.   i had the record for grandparents documented well which helped.   you can save 1k without consultant but it was worth it vs figuring it out on your own and she hand delivered documents.   we went thru the los angeles consultate.    we live near sf so that was the closest.   you have to visit consulate or embassy only once  in process so pick the closest one to you.    

 
the consultant i used is

Aleksandra Kaniak
(310) 714 3342
kaniak2010@...
She is knowledgeable and excellent

good luck

arnold friedman


Ina Getzoff
 

Ian:
I don't know if things have changed but the son of a friend of mine decided about six or seven years ago that because his maternal grandparents came from Poland he also wanted to obtain Polish citizenship. I helped him to get much of the paperwork that proved his claim. Eventually, we found out that he would have to write an essay in Polish stating why he wanted this citizenship and also send $400 to the President of Poland and it would then take about two or three years before he got a response. He does not speak Polish (he is an American Doctor) and I asked him if he wanted to send the $400 and not know if the next month or year the current president no longer was president. After thinking about it he decided he would rather spend the money on the new home he and his wife had purchased. I thought it was a better idea. 
Admittedly, we all want to somehow come full circle in our ancestry but this was not a good idea. 
Ina Getzoff
Delray Beach, Fla. USA


Ian Charles
 

Ina: it's interesting that some people appear to have found it very straightforward and others have faced seemingly insurmountable obstacles. If I had a doctor's income I don't think I'd find $400 one of the insurmountable obstacles, but the essay in Polish might be a challenge without some assistance from a friend or Mr Google Translate :)


--
Ian Charles
London, UK


arnold friedman
 

follow up ina's post.

for polish citizenship and passport there is curremtly no requirement for an essay.   all the documents you submit for proof must be translated to polish, so in part thats what my consultant did for us.   

best

arnold friedman


Ira Leviton
 

At the International Jewish Genealogy conference in Warsaw in 2018, there was a company at the vendor's tables offering their services to do this.

I knew I was eligible because my father was born in Poland, and was interested enough to exchange contact information.  They followed up with me, but I decided not to pursue it, so I can't comment on their services.  The representative's name was Eva Hussain, and she asked a lot of sensible questions to confirm whether I was eligible, and even explained that the documents I had located on the Internet as an amateur genealogist weren't going to be valid because they weren't properly notarized, but would make the documentation much easier.  Her e-mail address in 2018 was euassist@... (yes, an Australian web address).


Rebecca Racer
 

Hi!
Yes, I am currently using Lexmotion to file an application for my husband and children. The person I am working with has been wonderful. He responds to my emails that contain lots of questions and we even had a zoom "meet and greet". In terms of cost, we had to give a $500 deposit for them to do the document search in Poland. The balance will be paid when our file is complete. We are responsible for obtaining all the supporting documents (birth, marriage, death, etc.) but I've found I've been able to do that with no issue. 
The application has to be submitted in Polish and all the documents have to be translated into Polish, which they will do once we submit all the paperwork to them. Nothing has to be Apostilled. Knowledge or speaking of Polish is not required (which is great b/c I am applying through Romania for myself and I have to learn conversational Romanian and have all my documents Apostilled). 

I found their prices to be the most reasonable and I've priced out a few offices (some immigration lawyers in Poland and other agencies). The additional costs come from obtaining the documents (birth, marriage, death, etc. from the various offices) and depending on how many people in your family you are applying for. 

Good luck. 

Rebecca Racer
NJ


mbekken@...
 

My kids would like to do this because their grandfather was the only one in his family to survive. He was born in Pruzhany when it was in polish hands. The problem is how to find a birth certificate. All I have is his attestation at the DP camp after the war. Any ideas on how one might locate a birth certificate for someone born in a small town when that town freely submitted all its Jews? He was never able to get one, nor any reparation for his family's house and mill.

Marijke Bekken
mbekken@...
NV
Researching ROSENBAUM, KATZ, PAKLER