Topics

Date of Birth input into databases #advice

nardir4@...
 

I am new to this group and apologise if this has already been discussed.
My grandfather left Lithuania in the 1890's and changed his name when he got to England,and would never reveal his original name.
We have ,however,a date of birth for him.My question is-"Is there any way of accessing the Jewish Gen databases or any other database using the DOB as
the input?".Since there cannot be a great number of births amongst the Jewish community at the time on any particular date, we may possibly be able to
recognise and follow up details from other things we knew about him.Any help and suggestions would be much appreciated.

Bella Tseytlin
 

Hi all,

This is an excellent idea and I was going to ask same question ages ago, but was expected that the answer will be that to add or change anything will require new software & it will be very costly. 

Thank you.

Flavio Baran
 

Others may have more precise help for you, but I can suggest a great resource: The Jewish Genealogy Society Of Great Britain has tons of materials on immigrants from Eastern Europe. https://jgsgb.org.uk/

Nancy S
Maryland, USA

Flavio Baran
 

I am not sure that my earlier email went through to you. I have two suggestions:
1, your relatives may not have changed their names until they arrived here. So there may be some records under their original name.
2 A great resource is the jewish genealogy society of great britain. 
https://jgsgb.org.uk/ 

Nancy S
Maryland USA

geniediane
 

You can try to do just that but also remember that sometimes births may not have been registered with authorities until several years later.

Diane Jacobs
Somerset NJ


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "nardir4 via Groups.Jewishgen.Org" <nardir4=yahoo.com.au@...>
Date: 11/3/19 6:21 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Date of Birth input into databases #advice

I am new to this group and apologise if this has already been discussed.
My grandfather left Lithuania in the 1890's and changed his name when he got to England,and would never reveal his original name.
We have ,however,a date of birth for him.My question is-"Is there any way of accessing the Jewish Gen databases or any other database using the DOB as
the input?".Since there cannot be a great number of births amongst the Jewish community at the time on any particular date, we may possibly be able to
recognise and follow up details from other things we knew about him.Any help and suggestions would be much appreciated.
--
Diane Jacobs

Russ Maurer
 

Yes, this is easy to do using either the LitvakSIG "All Lithuania Database" (https://www.litvaksig.org/search-ald) or the JewishGen Lithuania Database (https://www.jewishgen.org/databases/Lithuania/), which searches the ALD and other records. Dates of birth in ALD birth records are formatted as DD/MM/YYYY; single-digit months and days are generally recorded without leading zeros. Dates of birth sometimes are found in other kinds of records such as census, marriage, or death records and there may be differences in the format, such as the use of hyphens instead of slashes, the presence of leading zeros, or the use of alpha months in place of numerical. It is important to recognize that "/" and "-" are not permissible in the search input and must be replaced by spaces.

Thus, for example, to search for a birthday of March 9, 1875, input "any field" "contains" "9 3 1875" and, to make sure you haven't missed anything, also try the following variations:
09 3 1875
09 03 1875
9 03 1875
9 mar 1875
09 mar 1875

The ALD contains over 244,000 birth records. Good luck!

Russ Maurer, Records Acquisition & Translation Coordinator, LitvakSIG

Marion Werle
 

Currently, JewishGen (or LitvakSIG) databases are not searchable by birth year, let alone birthdate, nor are birth records complete, or even available, for every Litvak town. You should also be aware that any birthdates supplied by immigrants in the locale where they settled are not necessary accurate. All immigrants ultimately took an official birthdate, which may or may not reflect when they were actually born. In many cases, they may not even have known - maybe an approximate date and proximity to a holiday (Pesach, Purim, Shavuot). Unless you can actually find a birth record, you will be lucky to figure out the year of birth (perhaps from a revision list or marriage record, although there was also incentive to lie on revision lists, especially for males of draft age).

Marion Werle
<canadagenes@...>
Sent from my Samsung Galaxy Tab

--
Marion Werle
<canadagenes@...>

nardir4@...
 

Thank you for the replies.My Grandfather we believe came from Vilnius.He left presumably to escape conscription in the Russian Army.He walked across Europe with his younger sister playing his violin on street corners to survive.At that time passports were not compulsory and it was easy to enter England without any real documentation.Which I am fairly certain he did.I wonder how many East European Jews were ever officially registered in any meaningful and traceable way.

I have done a Y-Dna test and know his haplogroup JM-172 and have identified chromosome sequences with a number of people,some suggesting we may have had a common great or great-great grandparent.I don’t know why,but sadly it is very rare for anyone to reply to emails for information.I keep hoping in this endless frustrating search that the missing piece of the Jig saw puzzle will just appear.This is not a topic for this forum.I merely mention it to say how grateful I am for the speedy replies to my request for help.

Bella Tseytlin
 

God Bless you, Russ Maurer!

Many Thanks.

ps (are we allowed to say God bless...!?)

Bella Tseytlin
 

Thank you for the advice, unfortunately as far as I know,  non of my folk left Eastern Europe. 

Bella

Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,

I manage several kits and some of the men have J-M172 y-DNA.

Which company have you used for testing?

Regards
Angie Elfassi
Israel

Marion Werle
 

Russ, I had no clue. Thanks for the tip, although it still presumes you have an exact date, which seems elusive for most of my Litvak ancestors. 
--
Marion Werle
<canadagenes@...>

Louis Zetler
 

Note that Lithuania had a different calendar and only started following the Gregorian in the early 1900 (subject to correction. So when taking Lithuanian records which are also in Hebrew/Yiddish, convert the Hebrew date to the Gregorian date.

nardir4@...
 

HI Angie.I used Family Tree for the Y-dna test.I am also on Ancestry,My Heritage,and Gedmatch with my autosomal dna results.
Best Wishes
Robin

Danielle Weiner
 

Hi Louis,
Do you have any Zetler family that lived in Vilna in the late 1800s - early 1900s? 

My grandmother's brother, Simon/Shimel Geler, married a Bunika/Bunia Zetler bat Khonon in 1898 in Vilna.  Khonon's wife may have been named Khaia.  Do any of these names sound familiar to you?

Thank you,
Danielle Weiner

PS - with this new JG forum format, I did not know how to email you properly so I just tagged on to one of your previous posts!