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Re: David and Ida.ITZIK from Kalarash #bessarabia

Yefim Kogan
 

Hello Rick,

 

I want to reply to your message, but also give a few advice to everybody who is researching their families.

 

Rick, you right, the Last name is very important in searchers,  but the spelling of the last name you are used to.

In your case you searched for HAROL last name, and did find exact match.  That is very understandable.

There is NO letter in Russian alphabet, which are transcribed into “H”.  There is no sound similar to sound of “H”.

Probably in Russian that surname was  ХАРАЛ or  ХАРОЛ, and that would be transcribed into KHARAL / KHAROL.

 

I would suggest never search for an exact surname.

 

I did a simple search for KHARAL in Bessarabia and got a lot of hits.  One was really interesting and probably related to you.

 

Here is a marriage record for a person who according to the record had 2 surnames NISIMOV  and KHARAL,  but  also the first name is David and his father’s name is Itsko.  One more thing… the rabbi who married the couple was from Tuzor, which is another name for Kalarash!

 

Kishinev /
Kishinev /
Bessarabia


16/12/1910
8 Tevet 

NISIMOV / KHARAL, Duvid / David 


LEKAKHMAKHER, Enya-Khaya / Enya-Chaya 

Itsko / Yitschok
 
Kishinev



 
Nesvizh 

53 


44 

Groom was widower, Kishinev townsman, per Tuzor rabbi report of December 10, 1910, #200. Bride was a widow, Nesvizh townswoman. Ketubah: 24 rubles in silver paid. 

 


Meyer-Srul / Meir-Yisrael AYDENSHTEYN 


I. DEKHTERMAN 

Kishinev 


1910 

Marriage 


327 

2292612 



00872 


117 


NARM 211/11/408 

 

Do you know anything about Enya-Khaya, wife of David KHARAL? Maybe it is a second wife?  It says in the record that Groom was widower.

 

Here is a copy of original record in Russian and Hebrew:

 

 

There are many other records, which I would suggest to look at.

 

Here is one more finding:

Bessarabia Duma Voters List

Searching for Surname (phonetically like) : KHARAL AND
Any Field (contains) : TUZOR
2 matching records found.

Run on Tue, 19 May 2020 12:53:07 -0600

 

Item

Name

Patronym

Qualification
Reason

Town - Russian Name


Town - ModernName

Uyezd


Country

Year

15-31 

KHOROL, Duvid

Itskov 

d. 200 

Tuzora 


Tuzara / Calarasi 

Orgieev 


Mold. 

1906 

17-56 

KHOROL, Duvid

Itskov 

d. 200 

Tuzora 


Tuzara / Calarasi 

Orgieev 


Mold. 

1907 

 

 

Here is one more thing I would suggest.  When you are trying to get help from this group, please put information you already know, we do not want to repeat your findings.

Also if you have a postcard, photo with the names written in any languages – that would be important to know and to see.

 

Yefim Kogan    <yefimk@...>

 

Rickharold@...
 

Thank you Yefim for your research efforts.  


Here are the only facts I am certain of: My grandfather Itzik Harol arrived in NY in 1907. That was his name on the ship manifest. Later Americanized to Isador Harold.  His WW I draft registration has a birthdate April 22, 1892, originally from Kalarash. Although our family remembers him stating he was from Odessa.  


I am searching for Itzik’s birth records confirming his parents were David and Ida who he listed on his transcribed marriage certificate in the US in 1917.  If David and Ida are his parents I would like to find out as much information as possible about them and their ancestors.  Perhaps David’s father was Itsko born around 1818? 

What is the significance of having two surnames Nisimov/Kharal? Is that common and should I be searching for Nisimov as well?  It appears that David remarried in 1910 at age 53.  I did not know this.  Is Nesvizh his second wife’s surname? Who are the names Aydenshteyn and Dekhterman appearing in the marriage record?  

I would like to move forward With a comprehensive search and retrieval of original records. Is this something you have the time to help me with? Again, thank you very much for your time and help.

Regards, 

Rick Harold
rickharold@...

Rickharold@...
 

Hi Yefim,

at your convenience please look at my last email, May 21 below.  

Thank you,

Rick Harold