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Deportation from U.S. ports back to Eastern Europe #general


jdthcohen@yahoo.com
 

Deportation, also known as Return Migration, was often due to poor health or lack of money and other factors. Does anyone know how these folks fared once back in the "old country"? 
Any personal stories or other information would be most welcome.
 
Thank you,
Anne C.
 
 
 
 
Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


Yefim Kogan
 

Anne,  that was always an interesting question for me.

I should tell you that there were one more reason, Jews returned back and that is they did not like it here...

Here is an interest article on this topic by Doctor Jonathan Sarna we have it at our Bessarabia website  (with permission of Dr. Sarna):
"The Myth of No Return: Jewish Return Migration to Eastern Europe, 1881-1914"

https://www.jewishgen.org/bessarabia/files/JewishHistory/MythofNoReturnFromSarna.pdf

On a personal note, my great grandfather  Shloyme was one who did not like, because he had to work here in a shoe factory on Shabbat.  Returned back  and died from hunger during WWII.

Yefim Kogan


Marshall Lerner
 

Between 1903 and 1914 my paternal great grandfather traveled back and forth between Bessarabia and the US at least 3 times, each time in steerage. In 1903 my ggf (Schimen Baitel) landed in NY and made his way up to Chelsea, Massachusetts. In 1904 my grand uncle (Jankel Beitel) came over to join Simon Beitel in Chelsea where my ggf apparently settled. In 1907 my ggf transits to the US again (this time as Schimon Lerner) and lists my grand uncle's address in Chelsea as his final destination. (By this time my grand uncle was Jacob Lerner.)  In 1913 my grandfather (Zeidel Baitel) immigrates to the US and goes to Chelsea to join his stepbrother. Finally in 1914.my ggf makes his last trip to the US to stay with Jacob until his passing.In the meanwhile Zeidel becomes Morris Lerner and moves to Concord, New Hampshire.

My great grandmother (Chaje Lerner) and a grand aunt (my gf's natural sister) remained in Brichany (Briceni). So it would appear that at least one possible explanation for the return of immigrants was the family left behind. Why did my ggm elect to stay in Bessarabia? Family legend has it that my grand aunt (name unknown) who remained in Brichany was a commissar involved in the Russian revolution. .


Ellen
 

My grandfather went back to Russia around 1925, having emigrated to the U.S. in 1907.  Accompanying him was my grandmother, who he had married in 1922, and their infant son.  I can only imagine my grandmother's reaction to his decision; she had come to the U.S. only a few years earlier, delayed by WWI.   Apparently, my grandfather believed that conditions in Russia had improved after the Revolution.  It's possible that one of his brothers, a Bolshevik and government official, had written to him, though we do not have copies of any correspondence between them.    

In Russia, my grandmother enjoyed meeting her in-laws, but my grandfather must not have been happy with what he found, and he was not afraid to speak up.  Exactly what he said, I don't know.  Eventually, a neighbor warned my grandmother that there could be dire consequences if he continued to speak out.  Towards the end of 1926, the family boarded a ship in Rotterdam and headed back to New York.

Ellen  
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Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)


Judi Wagner
 

My great uncle, Miksa (Michael) HIRSCHFELD, son of Yosef, was turned back from Ellis Island 20 Jan 1922 because of a heart murmur and sent back to Hodod, now Romania.   He was in a labor battalion in Bucharest in Oct 1942.  He was able to get to Israel, I do not have any details of how or when, where he died 25 Apr 1976, buried Petach Tikvah, Segulah cemetery, Israel. 

He had two daughters by a first wife, unfortunately, no one is left that remembers their names.  They did come to visit and stayed with my grandparents when my mother and aunt were young, probably early 1930's.  I do have photographs of the girls with my mother and aunt in Astoria NYC and also at Rockaway Beach, NYC.  Would be awesome to somehow find out what happened to them.  

Judi KESSEL WAGNER

Florida and NYC

 

KISILEVSKIJ>KISSILEWSKY Nova Pryluka , BROIDE>BRODY Berdychiv

HIRSCHFELD, ZEIGER Hodod, Romania, VAYNSHTEIN>WEINSTEIN Khotyn

KLEIN Satoraljaujhely, Kis-Cigand,  GROSZMAN Satoraljaujhely, Ladmovce

RECHTER Bolekhov, Dolyna Ukraine, HALPERN Bolekhov, Cisow , WAGNER Warszawa, MILETSKY Shereshevo, Belarus

 


kdomeshek@...
 

My grandmother was coughing upon arrival at Ellis Island.  Authorities feared TB.  She was not allowed entry.  Her name was crossed out from the manifest.  The arrival vessel, SS Mt. Clay, showed two passengers on board during the return trip to Hamburg.  Those two passengers where my grandmother and my great uncle, who was accompanying my underage grandmother during the voyage back to the old country.  A few months later, my great uncle had obtained passage on another vessel, and he and my grandmother returned to the U.S.  Her cough had cleared.  She was admitted into the country.  And therefore, I exist.  Had she stayed in the old country, she probably would have perished in/near Nowogrudek.

Ken Domeshek

Damesek, Kartorzynski, Sinienski, Braverman.


Sherri Bobish
 


Judi,

Can you clarify some things about Miksa HIRSCHFELD's wife and two daughters?

Do you mean you do not know their first names, or that you do not know their surname because Miksa's wife re-married?

Did Miksa's wife and two daughters visit your family from abroad, or did they live in the U.S. at the time of their visit around 1930?

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Judy Salomon
 

Finding names of his two daughters.
 
Have you tried looking on Passenger arrival records for their visit to USA.
There were fewer immigrants in the 1930's and you might get lucky.
 
Judy Salomon
New Jersey
 

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Judith Salomon
VP of Membership, JGS of North Jersey
FREUND Pruchnik, FELDMAUS Lezajnsk
SULTAN, Husiatyn, GOLDBERG Mostiska
SALOMON, HIRSCH, THAL Neumagen, Germany


avivahpinski@verizon.net
 

This is a long shot, but some of the boat records include the name and address of where the person was going.   You would have to look
through a lot of records, but you might find your family name and address listed in the destination column of the boat manifest. 

Good luck!

Avivah Pinski
near Philadelphia
 

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Avivah R. Z. Pinski ,  near Philadelphia, USA


Aaron Slotnik
 

A distinctive feature of the MyHeritage index to Ellis Island passenger manifests is that they indexed the destination column. I've found some relatives that way that I would have never found otherwise.

Regards,

Aaron Slotnik

Chicago, IL


Judi Wagner
 

Sherri,

I do not know the name of the first wife, or the daughters of Miksa.  His second wife was Pepi.
They lived abroad, and the girls came to the US in the 1930s.  I am guessing they still lived in Hungary/Romania then, because Miksa was in a labor battalion in 1942, and must have gotten to Israel with his second wife and the children later.  

It is possible that the children went to live with other relatives of their mother.
I still have an elderly relative, a nephew of my grandfather and Miksa, that is a holocaust survivor living in Brooklyn.  He would dearly love to find out about these women or their families.  I have been searching for years, and this relative is very unwell, and not as mentally functioning as in years past.  

Judi


Judi Wagner
 

OMG, I think I found them!!!
Eliane 11 and Vilet 10 arriving on the USS Manhattan from Genoa  6 Apr 1940
going to uncle, A HIRSCHFELD ( my grandfather was Alexander) at 3055 33rd St in Astoria,
 they lived in Astoria, not at that address that I know, but they also moved a few times in Astoria, I can check if they ever lived at that address, but that would be too coincidental not to be them!
It says they were born in Paris France, which we totally had no idea, and came from a grandmother, R Roth in Budapest.  
Thank you so very much for the suggestions to check out passenger manifests.
Aren't jewish genners the best?
Thank you, I will call my relative tomorrow
Judi


Sherri Bobish
 


Judi,

I see they landed on April 6, 1940.  The 1940 U.S. census was April 1st.  If they had arrived a few days earlier than you might find them on the census. 

I'm glad that these two girls were able to make it to safety.

I see an Alex HIRSCHFELD on the 1940 census at 3055 33rd.  Wife Ethel, children Vivian and Pearl.  Is this the right family?  If so, than the girls you found arriving on April 6th are the ones you have been searching for.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Judi Wagner
 

Sherri,
Yes this is absolutely my family!  My mother was Pearl.  I also checked the census and saw it was the exact same address.  I have called and left messages for my elderly holocaust survivor relative to pass on these names.  And of course, sent out emails to my cousins, etc.  I really am so happy to put a name to the photos, and now I will have to see if I can find them and their descendants.  I took a quick look for marriages in NY but didn't see anything yet.  It is possible they were sent to Israel by relatives of their mother.  I am also going to research their birth records in Paris, that was another new fact.  And, see if I can get copies of their passports that were issued in Budapest.  Lots of additional work to do :-)
Judi


Sherri Bobish
 


Judi,

There is no notation on the girls' passenger manifest indicating that either of them ever applied for naturalization. 

Did their mother or father come to the U.S. before they turned 18?  I am not sure if they could have naturalized under a parent's papers at that time?

Something to think about.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Judi Wagner
 

Sherri,
No, their mother was dead, and the father could not come to US, was already sent back in 1923 before they were born for a heart murmur.  I am hoping to find a marriage record, then maybe I can trace them.  I did a quick check on that and nothing turned up, but I will keep at it.

Judi


bethglaser52@...
 

My father in law came to New York as a stow away. He went to work for his brother but was turned in by the person whose job he took. He was sent back to Roumania. His future wife was sent to marry him, get pregnant and then he arrived about 1938 back in NY. Where would I find his deportation records for around 1935-37? Menacum Mendel (Max) Glazer or Glaser b. abt 1907.
Thank you
Beth Glaser
He stowed away with his friend Irving Hans who was also returned but from what I could find on him he was sent to Canada where he reentered with papers. Max chose to go
home as his mother was very sick. Free ticket I guess.


RDeutsch@...
 

I  found a record of my ggf Nachman Deutsch coming to the United States from Dolhinov (Belarus, Lithuania, Russia) along with one of his young children Chaim Deutsch.  Then no additional records at all until 1904 when my grandfather Abraham Deutsch came to the United States and the young child my ggf came with shows up coming again.   No records of leaving the US and no records of living here and no records of my ggf????   They must have returned but what a brick wall.


mindyoc
 

What do readers believe is the best data base for early 1900 passenger records?


Sherri Bobish
 

mindyoc
   
asked:  "What do readers believe is the best data base for early 1900 passenger records?"

Passenger records for which country?  If you can be more specific, than more precise answers can be given.

In general, I suggest www.familysearch.org which is a free site, and has a good selection of passenger manifest databases for The U.S.

Of course, www.stevemorse.org is a wonderful resource.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ