Different spellings of surnames #germany #names


Eva Lawrence
 

Some people care about spelling, some people don't. At least two of my father's direct ancestors  clearly cared a lot. One, David Gimbel, couldn't even write very well.  His daughter Amalie was so enchanted with the only (I assume) letter she received from him, that I still have it, passed down through  four generations. It was obviously written for him by a scribe, who had put the signature Dein Vater, David Gimpel, but besides signing it  David Jacob, his Jewish name, in wobbly Hebrew characters David has crossed out the p and written in a b. That's understandable, as Gimpel is the local word for simpleton.
The letter is addressed to Amalie's husband, Abraham Ney, but here David wasn't so particular, because the scribe has written Abraham Neu. Most of the officials who recorded the family vital events during the 1800s also used the spelling Neu.  It sounded the same in the Pfalz dialect, but my ancestor Joseph Ney of Niederkirchen was very particular about the y. The first person to use the surname, he aways  signed with an emphatic y , as did his son, Abraham. In 1901 Joseph took the trouble to enshrine the y in law, with an Amtsgericht asserting that he had been using it before the 1808 Napoleonic Edict.   
My mother's ancestors weren't so pedantic, and seem to have moved from Ungar to Unger for a reason I can't fathom, though it may just be the transcription that changed, as the two spellings are hard to distinguish in manuscript.
 
--
Eva Lawrence. 
St Albans, UK.


Sheldon Clare
 

My father was born in what is now Lithuania. His original surname was Klioraitas. When he came to the US, he was given the name Clare. The rest of his family went to Argentina. Their surnames were Klor and Klior.
 
Sheldon ClareTucson, AZ


michele shari
 

I think some of the variations in spelling is due to the script used at that time and some is due to the conversion of the spelling from Hebrew to the local language.
My paternal grandmother's last name was STAUBER, but all my Montreal, Canada cousins spell it STOBER, one branch of the family in the U.S. spells it STOUBER, the Montreal ancestor who came to NY spells it STAUBER, and Israeli cousins spell it SHTAUBER (due to the "shin" vs. "sin" in the Hebrew alphabet). In Romania some spellings had a J, as in STOJBER, some STOIBER (maybe that is the Yiddish accented name?) and yet someone from JG contacted me with yet another variation that does not pick up on Daitch-Soundex, STAMBER, and this spelling apparently was only confined to one town, Szurdoc. I think the "AU" and "OU" and "AM" variations, were definitely due to script interpretations, as when you connect the letters it can look like any of those depending on who is writing it and how curvy the letters appear. All families did use different spellings at some point or another. Unfortunately none of the DNA companies as yet have accounted for this on their programs so when searching I put in multiple names and have had success. 
BTW, in reference to the NEU/NEY mentioned above by Eva who started this thread, there is a Rabbi Ruvi New here in Florida, US who is a Chabad Rabbi. Maybe he is a "neu" cousin!
Michele Farkas
Boynton Beach, FL (formerly NY, like so many others!)
Researching Farkas, Stauber (and variations), Potashnik, Ptasnik, Ptashnik (another new spelling variation)


lydgateaction@...
 

Apart from conversion to local letter sounds, there is also the issue of meaning in a local language. For example
my Ney/Nai relatives who went to South Africa became Newman. The word Nai in Afrikaans means the act of sexual intercourse. 

https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Naai

It can have similar meaning in some other languages too

https://www.wordsense.eu/naida/

Aubrey Blumsohn

Sheffield, UK


Alan Greenberg
 

Cross-border names can be mysterious. My some of my HYMOVITCH
relatives in Montreal moved to New York. They immediately became
HYMOWITZ. I have another relative whose name was PEDVESOTZKY (or some
variation) which they shortened to PEDVIS. They then moved to Chicago
and went by the name SOTZKY.

I have never been able to figure out why!

Alan Greenberg
Montreal, Canada


At 2021-03-23 07:29 AM, micheleshari via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I think some of the variations in spelling is due to the script used
at that time and some is due to the conversion of the spelling from
Hebrew to the local language.
My paternal grandmother's last name was STAUBER, but all my
Montreal, Canada cousins spell it STOBER, one branch of the family
in the U.S. spells it STOUBER, the Montreal ancestor who came to NY
spells it STAUBER, ....

Michele Farkas


Stephen Weinstein
 

On Mon, Mar 22, 2021 at 08:47 AM, Eva Lawrence wrote:
In 1901 Joseph took the trouble to enshrine the y in law, with an Amtsgericht asserting that he had been using it before the 1808 Napoleonic Edict.   
I'd be skeptical of anyone in 1901 asserting he had been using any spelling before 1808 simply because it's unlikely someone old enough to write in 1808 would still be alive in 1901.

Maybe he meant his family, or his paternal line ancestor, had been using it, not him personally.
 
--
Stephen Weinstein
Camarillo, California, USA
stephenweinstein@...