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DNA ethnicity

ntc52@...
 

Hi. Thank you for accepting my onto your site.
I'm trying to trace my maternal family. My mother was born in Lwow, Poland and brought up Roman catholic. I have very little information but I have possibly found my grandparents marriage in a Roman catholic church. my DNA results disclosed 50% Jewish ethnicity. This is on my maternal side and presumably means that if not my mother my grand parents were Jewish. One hypothesis is conversion another is adoption. Sticking with the conversion theory....I think that there may have been a process of converting and therefore documents. Might anyone know about this process and how I could access such documents. Many thanks.

assaf.patir@...
 

Other than looking for their names in JewishGen, I would also look at: genteam.eu
They have some records about conversions in Austro-Hungary.


On Sun, Jan 12, 2020 at 08:42 AM, <ntc52@...> wrote:
I'm trying to trace my maternal family. My mother was born in Lwow, Poland and brought up Roman catholic. I have very little information but I have possibly found my grandparents marriage in a Roman catholic church. my DNA results disclosed 50% Jewish ethnicity. This is on my maternal side and presumably means that if not my mother my grand parents were Jewish. One hypothesis is conversion another is adoption. Sticking with the conversion theory....I think that there may have been a process of converting and therefore documents. Might anyone know about this process and how I could access such documents. Many thanks.

boris
 

It will help others to help you if the message is less cryptic.

For instance, your grandparents’ names, dates of birth/death/marriage will place your inquiry in a proper historical context.  There may be a love story behind a mixed marriage that took place 120 years ago or last Sunday. But if your grandmother was born, e.g. 1939, one must consider a possibility of her being Jewish by birth, saved by the Catholics during WWII, and living her life as a Catholic afterwards.

I also would like to use this opportunity to call on “fellow genealogists” to list your full name and a contact info in the body of the message. In this case, it would be nice to know wether to address “ntc52" as Nancy or Nicolas. Also, if there is a need to write a direct message, a responder should not waste his time figuring out how to do it. There is no benefit in hiding. As someone whose personal data was stolen from US government databases at least once, and reports of Google amassing our personal medical information, I no longer believe in privacy of anything, as sad as it sounds. No system, including JewishGen, is immune to hacking, so we may as well make life a bit easier for each other.

Boris Feldblyum
boris@...

Sarah L Meyer
 

There are some great Jewish genealogy groups on Face book including one on DNA.  Also the regular DNA groups there have search angels and DNA Detectives who might be able to assist you in your search.  There is also a non-Jewish Polish genealogy group with I think records available on the internet. 

ntc52@...
 

Continued:
Mother- Maria Teresa /Theresa Szczepaska b.22 Mar 1925 in Lwow, Poland. Forced labour to Cologne May 1942. Married 12 Oct 1946. Arrived in England- Winter 1946.

Grandparents-
Michal Szczepanski  B. unknown.  Lived in -Lwow- Occupation- In banking. Arrested 1940  by Russians ? Siberia?
                       - Zofia  Mrozowaska (?) B. unknown.  Lived in Lwow.  Marriage abt. 1923  Arrested 1940 by Russians? Siberia?

ntc52@...
 

Thank you Sarah. I'm a member of some of these sites. You are right they can be very helpful.  I find myself doubling up as I'm exploring both the RC and Jewish routes for information.   

Ellen
 

Not to alarm you, but if your grandparents were arrested, they could have been exiled to Siberia, sentenced to a labor camp, or even executed.  

An uncle told me years ago that my grandfather's brother was arrested around that time, and it was assumed he was deported to Siberia.  But I later found my great-uncle's name on a website listing "victims of Stalin," indicating that he was executed (shot) in 1937.  I've since learned the complete story from his granddaughter. 

There are many books about Stalin's purges during this time.  The "Great Purge" occurred in the late 1930s, but there were thousands of other executions carried out under Stalin until his death in 1953.


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Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN (Shklov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)

ntc52@...
 

Hi Ellen,  Thank you for taking to trouble to reply. I've made a note of The "Great Purge" for my reading. 
My mother definitely believed that Siberia was the end for her parents and they were never heard of again. I hadn't realised myself until recently that some survived Siberia or escaped.

Isabel Cymerman
 

I agree with Boris.  I know a cousin who married a Catholic during the war and was saved but only if she converted.   The priest asked her to convert and she did.

Isabel  Cymerman
Southbury, CT