Topics

DNA tests for genealogy in Israel #dna


Reuven Mohr
 

Hello,
 
I'm living in Israel, and trying to order a DNA test kit on Myheritage, or Ancestry results in a note like "not available in your country". Israel seems to have a law not allowing this.
Now I came across FamilyTreeDNA, and the possibility to order a kit for a mitochondrial DNA test to Israel seems to be unblocked. (I was just curious and did not enter a credit card to make the deal) 
 
Is anyone familiar with mitochondrial tests in Israel? What are the options? 
 
I have no knowledge on this branch of genealogy till now.
Thanks for your suggestions.
 
Reuven Mohr
Jerusalem area, Israel


Alex Fuchs
 

I had a similar question recently and called FTDNA.
They told me that they do sell to Israel all their DNA tests.
Why are you looking at mtDNA?  Unless you are interested in a very specific maternal line question, most people start with autosomal DNA (atDNA or Family Finder).
I was told that FTDNA sale is coming in August.
Alternatively, you can order Ancestry DNA from Amazon and ship it back yourself.
Then you can upload to FTDNA, MyHeritage, and GEDmatch.
 


Herbert Lazerow
 

If you are ordering an autosomal test like Family tree DNA's Family Finder, it is better to order it from either Family Tree DNA or MyHeritage than from Ancestry because Ancestry provides minimal information compared to the other two, and after you get your results, you can download your genome from one and post it on the other at no charge, thereby gaining access to another database of possible matches.
Bert
--
Herbert Lazerow
Professor of Law, University of San Diego
5998 Alcala Park, San Diego CA 92110
lazer@...
Author: Mastering Art Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2d ed. 2020)


David Brostoff
 

On Jul 27, 2020, at 11:25 AM, Herbert Lazerow <lazer@...> wrote:

If you are ordering an autosomal test like Family tree DNA's Family Finder, it is better to order it from either Family Tree DNA or MyHeritage than from Ancestry because Ancestry provides minimal information compared to the other two, and after you get your results, you can download your genome from one and post it on the other at no charge, thereby gaining access to another database of possible matches.
It's actually the opposite.

FTDNA and MyHeritage accept data from Ancestry, but unfortunately Ancestry does not accept data from other testing services.

<https://support.ancestry.com/s/article/Downloading-AncestryDNA-Raw-Data>

David


Alex Fuchs
 

I agree with David,
For best results, you need the most matches, and Ancestry has the biggest database by a mile.

You can always upload Ancestry results to others, but not vise versa.
I have more discoveries from Ancestry matches than from others combined.
Alex Fuchs


Dahn Cukier
 

Access: MyHeritage did not permit access to the DNA section when my cousin
was visiting (Israel) from the US.

She had no problem accessing other databases.

Data: The data from Ancestry is probably larger, but not better. If a cousin
tests with one company and does not share the data with the one
you have accesses, they will not show up.

Autosomal testing is quit confusing. I have relatives
my sister, mother and father's brother do not. Many of the entries
are the fine, but there are a few dozen unique too each
of us, the same for another sister/sister test I know of. Yes,
I am listed as my mothers child and uncle/nephew of my uncle,
and sibling of my sister.

Downloading matches. MyHeratage has/had a way to download all your matches
as a spreadsheet file. Ancestry has no way to download data and since they
updated the way to review data, is very poor considering I have
a few hundred new matches every month and well over 5000 "4th cousins and
closer" and full access to 9 tests.

Dani

On Monday, July 27, 2020, 11:56:14 PM GMT+3, Alex Fuchs <xxa@...> wrote:


I agree with David,
For best results, you need the most matches, and Ancestry has the biggest database by a mile.

You can always upload Ancestry results to others, but not vise versa.
I have more discoveries from Ancestry matches than from others combined.
Alex Fuchs


Reuven Mohr
 

I am specifically interested in my mother's mother's .... line, as I am more curious where this leads, than the other lines, where I feel I know enough living relatives, who don't really care for family history.


Reuven Mohr
 

ok, thank you all for your suggestions.
In any case I'll wait till August and see if there are more sales - maybe a reduced fare for both, autosomal and mitochondrial test. 


Eric Mack
 

MyHeritage DNA users need to use a VPN, or equivalent, in order to access that portion of the MH website while in Israel.


On Tuesday, July 28, 2020, 04:28:31 PM GMT+3, Dahn Cukier via groups.jewishgen.org <photograve99=yahoo.com@...> wrote:


Access: MyHeritage did not permit access to the DNA section when my cousin
was visiting (Israel) from the US.

She had no problem accessing other databases.

Data: The data from Ancestry is probably larger, but not better. If a cousin
tests with one company and does not share the data with the one
you have accesses, they will not show up.

Autosomal testing is quit confusing. I have relatives
my sister, mother and father's brother do not. Many of the entries
are the fine, but there are a few dozen unique too each
of us, the same for another sister/sister test I know of. Yes,
I am listed as my mothers child and uncle/nephew of my uncle,
and sibling of my sister.

Downloading matches. MyHeratage has/had a way to download all your matches
as a spreadsheet file. Ancestry has no way to download data and since they
updated the way to review data, is very poor considering I have
a few hundred new matches every month and well over 5000 "4th cousins and
closer" and full access to 9 tests.

Dani
On Monday, July 27, 2020, 11:56:14 PM GMT+3, Alex Fuchs <xxa@...> wrote:


I agree with David,
For best results, you need the most matches, and Ancestry has the biggest database by a mile.

You can always upload Ancestry results to others, but not vise versa.
I have more discoveries from Ancestry matches than from others combined.
Alex Fuchs


manderlie@...
 

Family Tree DNA or FTDNA  has two offerings you will not find on Ancestry.  Both Y DNA direct  paternal line) and mitochondrial mt DNA (direct maternal line) are included in Family Tree DNA as optional testing results for a fee, with the sample you take and submit by doing a swab (the swab is easier to use for seniors who have trouble with saliva production). The Y and mt DNA profiles are not possible to achieve on the raw data transfer from Ancestry.  Family Tree DNA is the pioneer company who started genetic genealogy. People are confused because the company Ancestry jumped on board much later with specific interest in autosomal DNA.  Of course, they had a large public profile due to previous subscription programs for researching family history incorporating previous platforms like bulletin boards and Rootsweb initially and expanded ultimately incorporating autosomal DNA. Originally the interface was 1:1 comparison as Ancestry and 23 and Me and FTDNA all used the same chip.  A couple of years ago, Ancestry added medical analysis to their results. Because of this, the chip was changed to accommodate. So, there is some compromise in the number of SNPs that are transferred with raw data. If it were me, I would test with FTDNA and support the company who started it all and get the most SNPs I can. The cost has significantly dropped since I tested. I have tested with Ancestry too and think it is a good thing to do.  Ancestry will not accept transfer in raw data.  But a word of caution, those who think they are saving money should consider that when Ancestry changed their chip a couple of years ago to accommodate for medical information, they reduced their noon-medical SNP testing. The results are still valuable, but the transfer can miss information.  The Family Finder test uses the Illumina OmniExpress microarray chip. The chip includes about 696,800 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). 23andMe examines about 690,000 predetermined SNPs. That may sound like a lot, but it is only 0.01 percent of the 6 billion DNA letters in the human genome. An excellent blog I suggest those interested read is Louis Kessler’s Behold Blog at: https://www.beholdgenealogy.com/blog/?p=2700 . This article has excellent charts to simplify the numbers and comparison.  Look at SNPs in common between companies before relying on transferring. I would test with both FTDNA and Ancestry and transfer FTDNA results to MyHeritage who uses the same chip as FTDNA, so it is generally a 1:1 match with a SD within range.  Importantly: FTDNA stores your sample for 25 years and thus can-do new testing without mailing costs as science progresses in the field. You can bequest your results to a descendant. You can study the Y and mt lines when you test with this company and if you cannot afford it today, it is on file to look at it later.  If you die, your grandmother dies and science advances and you are operating those kits, you can still learn from that DNA. Other companies do not store the samples.  So, every test you do would be another fee.  Finally, FTNDA does not carry the weight load of subscription fees.  When you test, you own the results. You can always upload to Gedmatch as well and those who upload from other companies can be compared there. If you meet a cousin who tested at Ancestry and you did not and they do not want to transfer results to FTDNA, then you can ask them to transfer to Gedmatch and compare at a neutral site.  Ancestry has a large data base. They have resources to advertise and brand familiarity, so it is well worth testing there too.  Remember people often do one test and do not transfer so the person you seek may be on another platform.
Susan Diamond


Sarah L Meyer
 

Since he is in Israel, MyHeritage can not sell him a kit legally, nor can he upload his results there.  He could upload his results from FTDNA or Ancestry while on his vacation if his device did not show Israeli origination.  Thank the Chief Rabbinate for this.  They don't want people to find out that they are mamzers (the product of a religiously illegal marriage or adultery), because the religious laws against these people are so vile.  DNA is legal in Israel except for the "purpose of finding relatives".  However, I have ordered FTDNA kits that were shipped to Israel, and I have uploaded the results to MyHeritage, because I am in the US.
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


JPmiaou@...
 

23 and Me says it ships to Israel: https://customercare.23andme.com/hc/en-us/articles/360000145307-What-Countries-Do-You-Ship-To-

Like Ancestry, 23 and Me does not take uploads from other companies, but unlike Ancestry, they do report (basic) Y- and mitochondrial haplogroups. They also have a reasonably large portion of their customer base with Ashkenazi ancestry, and they have a complex algorithm for sorting such matches beyond the basic centimorgans or percentages (which can be misleading for endogamous populations).

Julia
./\ /\
.>*.*<


Angie Elfassi
 

Hi,
 
When I had friends visiting here in Israel from France and they had done tests via MyHeritage, they wanted to show me their results.
 
They tried to enter their MyHeritage results but to no avail.
 
We phoned MyHeritage in Or Yehuda and explained the situation with the telephone operator and she gave my friend a special code to access her results, here, from Israel.
 
Regards
Angie Elfassi
Israel