does anyone know this Yiddish expression? #yiddish


Aline Petzold
 

I recently had a letter translated into English. The following expression was used by  my grandmother, the writer: "a Tateh can care for ten children but ten children can not care for one Tateh”.
I have an idea what it means, but i am wondering if anyone in this group has heard the expression and can tell me if there is an English equivalent. Thanks much.
Aline Petzold St. Paul MN USA


Barbara Kenzer
 

Tater means father. A father can take care of his ten children, but 10 children can not take care of one father.
I hope that helps.
Barbara Kenzer 
SUBURB OF CHICAGO,  IL


On Tue, May 11, 2021, 9:59 AM Aline Petzold <linypetzold@...> wrote:

I recently had a letter translated into English. The following expression was used by  my grandmother, the writer: "a Tateh can care for ten children but ten children can not care for one Tateh”.
I have an idea what it means, but i am wondering if anyone in this group has heard the expression and can tell me if there is an English equivalent. Thanks much.
Aline Petzold St. Paul MN USA


Barbara Kenzer
 

It is Tetah. I mispelled the word. 


On Tue, May 11, 2021, 10:11 AM Barbara Kenzer via groups.jewishgen.org <bkenzer2290=gmail.com@...> wrote:
Tater means father. A father can take care of his ten children, but 10 children can not take care of one father.
I hope that helps.
Barbara Kenzer 
SUBURB OF CHICAGO,  IL

On Tue, May 11, 2021, 9:59 AM Aline Petzold <linypetzold@...> wrote:

I recently had a letter translated into English. The following expression was used by  my grandmother, the writer: "a Tateh can care for ten children but ten children can not care for one Tateh”.
I have an idea what it means, but i am wondering if anyone in this group has heard the expression and can tell me if there is an English equivalent. Thanks much.
Aline Petzold St. Paul MN USA


Judy Floam
 

And it’s about children not being willing to care for their aging parents.

 

Judy Floam

Baltimore, MD


Jx. Gx.
 

Aline,

The expression means exactly what it says.  My mother used to say it in Yiddish and then repeat it in English. She more correctly said, "A MOTHER can take care of 10 children, but 10 children cannot care for their mother."  Traditionally, mothers have always taken care of the household and made sure the children were well-fed, clothed, took care of them when they got sick, and comforted them when they scraped their knee while playing.  But when the years pass and the mother becomes weak or sick, often times her adult children can find no time to care for her. Heartbreaking.

Jeffrey Gee
Arizona    


Aline Petzold
 

Hello all:
 Thanks to everyone who took the time to reply to my question.  You are a great group!
Aline Petzold
St. Paul MN


yitschok@...
 

This phrase expresses the mercy and love of parents towards their children vs. the mercy and love of children towards their parents. 

This expression is from the work of Rabbi Yeshayahu [Isaiah] Horowitz (c. 1500 - 1630) known as the Shelah Hakaddosh, in his book Shenei Luchos Habris (Shaar HaOsiyos, Derech Eretz)
He writes there about parents supporting their children and giving them large amounts of money. He then mentiones this expression as a folks parable, "אמרו במשל הדיוט, אב אחד מפרנס עשרה בניו באהבה וברצון, ועשרה בנים לא מפרנסים באהבה וברצון אב אחד שלהם" [one father provides for his ten sons with love and will, and ten sons do not support with love and will for their one father]. 

This expression is apparently based on the words of the Talmud (tractate Sotah page 49A) "היינו דאמרי אינשי רחמי דאבא אבני, רחמי דבני אבני דהוי ליה" [the mercy of a father is for his sons, the mercy of the son is for the sons he will have]. 

This idea is also mentioned another place in Talmud (tractate Sanhedrin page 72A-B) in the discussion of home invasion in the Jewish law, that when a father invades his son's home, it's obvious that the father will not kill his son, but in the opposite case this is not certain. 

--
Yitschok Margareten


Neil Kominsky
 

I recall this expression in common usage in English in my grandparents' (b. 1895-1899) generation.


Neil Kominsky
Brookline, MA


Rafael.Manory@...
 

From: Rafael Manory, PhD

Thanks Yitschok Margaretn for the detailed explanation. I was going to write that it is a Hebrew proverb, not an Yiddish one, and I also was aware of its  Talmudic origin. I am not aware of an English equivalent other than the direct translation. In Israel the expression is commonly used and  is traced to Pirkei Avot, as indicated.

Rafael Manory, PhD