Employment in the old country? #belarus #general #romania #ukraine


brianna.knoppow@...
 

Hello, I am interested in learning about the types of employment opportunities available for Jews in the Pale of Settlement. I know that in some areas Jews were not permitted to serve as civil servants with the government. I don't think these restriction were homogeneous throughout the Pale of Settlement. I thought there are merchants and tavern keepers in some places as well. Is there a Wiki on Jewish employment opportunities by city? I know that I have relatives who were tailors and carpenters. I also had relatives who were Rabbis. I'm interested in mid-late 1800s and 1900 - WWII

For now I am looking at the following,

Mogilev-na-Dniepr, Belarus
Minsk
Kozelets, Ukraine
Yasi, Romania
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Brianna Knoppow
Washington DC (from Michigan)

Searching for BRIKER/BRICKER, MOGILL, HIRSCH, LIFSHITS


Joel weiner
 

Many City Directories are online at genealogyindexer.org. Although they don’t indicate an individual’s religion, you could use first and/or last names to make a logical guess, then see their occupation.
Joel Weiner


Bruce Drake
 

Many Yizkor books have chapters on this very subject. Unfortunately, for those towns you named that have books, I did not see one.

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD


Bruce Drake
 

Here are two examples from Yizkor books that describe occupations

https://www.jewishgen.org/yizkor/sopotskin/sop024.html
 


Molly Staub
 

Hi Brianna,

My father Oscar/Usher Harast was born in 1902 in Dumbraveni, Soroki, Bessarabia/Russia/Romania, now Moldova. He had said that they owned an inn which had been in the family for several generations. My grandmother MIntza -- who later lived with us in Phila., PA -- had said she had done all the cooking for the inn (listed on official records as "tavern and inn keepers"). My father said he used to swim in the Dneister River and that the family vacationed at the Black Sea. He and his brother and sister had worked in the town library, so apparently they were literate. My father, his mother, and his two siblings emigrated to Philadelphia in 1920 (his father was deceased). The inn was then listed as belonging to his cousin, Pesach/Paul Harast, who died in 1932. HIS sons had already emigrated to Philadelphia. That's the end of my paper trail. Please see my Ancestry Public Tree titled "ArostStaub_2019".

Please contact me if I can be of any further help.

Molly Arost Staub
M. A. in Journalism

561-571-6699
Boca Raton, FL

SEARCHING IN MOLDOVA:
kHAREST, HARAST
SHTOFFMAN


Michele Lock
 

I have been able to find what professions were common in the early 1900s in the Siauliai district of Lithuania, based on the Jewish bank records that are for the town. The 1910-1913 bank records are mixed in with the tax list records, but they can be sorted out by adding 'bank' for a term searched for. For those years, I got the following: tradesman, shop assistant, photographer, teacher, dentist, musician, engineer, hotel keeper, barber, shopkeeperess (so archaic), shoemaker, tailor, painter, mason, Talmudic scholar, inspector at insurance office, melamed, merchant, pharmacist, wheelwright, doctor, baker, furniture seller, needleworker, capmaker, accountant, waitress, roof maker, household duties, typographer, carpenter, shop assistant at drugstore, baker, bread seller, milk seller, cantor, forestry business, cutter, slaughterer, clerk, and banker.

 

I suspect that in larger towns, that similar occupations would be common, at least in places not too distant from Lithuania. I have also seen in smaller towns occupations of wool processor, wood worker, and timber merchant, as well as farmer. 

Sometimes earlier tax records also have the occupation of the person. 

And in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania 1784 census, there are many entries for tavern keeper, which was acceptable during the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. But under Russian authorities after 1800, tavern keeping was discouraged, though apparently it did not die out completely.

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Michele Lock

Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock and Kalon/Kolon in Zagare/Joniskis/Gruzdziai, Lithuania
Lak/Lok/Liak/Lock in Plunge/Telsiai in Lithuania
Trisinsky/Trushinsky/Sturisky and Leybman in Dotnuva, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine/Lev/Lew in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Vilna gub., Belarus


brianna.knoppow@...
 

Thank you! Very interesting! Where do you look for bank records?
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Brianna Knoppow
Washington DC (from Michigan)

Searching for BRIKER/BRICKER, MOGILL, HIRSCH, LIFSHITS