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Equivalent Hebrew Name for Clara #names


Saba-isio
 

Hi, Can anyone give me the Equivqlent Hebrew Given Name for Clara?
Thank you in advance, all the best, stay safe , well and healthy and may we all enjoy this coming New Year 5781 in very good health and may the pandemic be eradicated. Aizic Sechter from the Lone Magen David Star State of Israel


Susan&David
 

This kind of request comes up regularly. There are no rules when it comes to selecting a secular name for a person who has a Hebrew name, or, in reverse, finding a probable Hebrew name for someone when a secular name is known.   I suggest searching the JewishGen Memorial Plaque Database for the name, and tabulate the results.
I did that for the first 108 matches for secular name Clara, in one random  section of the database, in  the USA.
Chaya 45
Keila 18
Chava 9
Klara/Clara 9
Chaika 6
Chana 4
Ester 2
Shayna 2
Gitel 2
One each:  Yenta, Tzipah, Chasya, Perel, Devorah, Sarah, Keysa. Kala, Krindel, Dinah, Kressla

David Rosen
Boston, Ma


On 9/11/2020 4:14 PM, Saba-isio via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Hi, Can anyone give me the Equivqlent Hebrew Given Name for Clara?
Thank you in advance, all the best, stay safe , well and healthy and may we all enjoy this coming New Year 5781 in very good health and may the pandemic be eradicated. Aizic Sechter from the Lone Magen David Star State of Israel


Oded
 

Shalom.
 
All the names suggested on the previous list are irrelevant.  
 
Clara - fem. personal name, from Latin Clara, fem. of clarus "bright, shining, clear" .
Other Derivatives : Claire, Clarisse, Clarice, Clarabel, Claribel.
 
In Hebrew:  Behira בהירה [uncommon].
Less accurate:  Levana לבנה [uncommon]. Means : white [fem.], also another name of the moon.
 
Oded Freilich


Sally Bruckheimer
 

"All the names suggested on the previous list are irrelevant."

Our ancestors didn't translate names to or from Hebrew. They didn't know the Latin origin of Clara. They used 'sounds like' names. Shayna became Jennie; Fayga became Fannie, and so on. The Hebrew translations of Clara are totally irrelevent, as women didn't use those names.

Of course, some used something completely different, because they liked it. My grandmother became Gertrude; my uncle's sister-in-law became Hortence. Neither worried about the Latin meaning of the name.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Glenda Rubin
 

I can relate to the statement "that our ancestors didn't translate names," but I think there were probably a myriad of ways how our family members got their US/English names. As my story illustrates, one needs to consider who was giving the name. It wasn't necessarily the person him/herself.
 
My maternal grandmother and her four siblings arrived in the US between 1909-1923.  Four of them had daughters born in the US and all were named (Jewish name) Mechle, after their mother.  My mother, being the oldest of her generation, was asked by her aunts and uncles to choose English names for her cousins, who became Mona, Mildred, and Muriel.  My mother at different stages of her life was Mae, Mayme, and even Mary! (given to her by a school secretary. You can be sure my grandparents wouldn't have given her that name). 
 
Glenda Rubin

On Sat, Sep 12, 2020 at 11:09 AM Sally Bruckheimer via groups.jewishgen.org <sallybruc=yahoo.com@...> wrote:
"All the names suggested on the previous list are irrelevant."

Our ancestors didn't translate names to or from Hebrew. They didn't know the Latin origin of Clara. They used 'sounds like' names. Shayna became Jennie; Fayga became Fannie, and so on. The Hebrew translations of Clara are totally irrelevent, as women didn't use those names.

Of course, some used something completely different, because they liked it. My grandmother became Gertrude; my uncle's sister-in-law became Hortence. Neither worried about the Latin meaning of the name.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

 

 


--
=========================================
Glenda Rubin
San Francisco Bay Area
Researching: STRYZEWSKI, STRAUSS, JANOFSKY, JANOFF, OBODOV, WERNICK, GREENBERG, KROCHAK. Shtetls: Lipovets, Ilintsy, Pliskov, Starokonstantinov, Krasilov


Jane Foss
 

My pgm had 3 names, Chanah, Chara & in the US Jennie, and I m named for her
 
--
jane Foss


kassells@...
 

The grand mother of my father in law was named Clara and her Jewish name was Keila, which has 18 hits in David Rosen's list.
Oded Freilich's suggested methodology is certainly not the way our ancestors looked at the question  

My wife was named Claire after her great grandmother. However her Hebrew name is Sarah, being born on Shabbat "Chayei Sarah". In her youth though she looked for a Hebrew equivalent as Oded did. She found Bruria, which a special name from a Talmudic heroine. 
Best regards   
Laurent Kassel 
Moreshet  Israel 


Oded
 

Jane Foss,
None of the names you have mentioned is Clara.
What Sara or Chana has to do with Clara? 
 
To all.
Why such a long discussion about such a simple question: What is the equivalent Hebrew name for Clara? 
 
Oded Freilich


Marcia Segal
 

The long discussion is because this is how threads unspool in a discussion. Nobody got injured, and people want to share.

One of my great-grandmothers was Chaia on the passenger list, and Clara in the US Federal censuses. Her daughter Chana became Annie. What I haven't figured out is what another great-grandmother's name may have been. On her grave marker it's Machli, but that's the masculine for of Machla. The only thing I can think of is that the final "ee" sound was a nickname of sorts, the way Loretta (as in Loretta Lynn) became Loretty to her family, and as above Chana became Annie but may have been Anna at some point.

Marcia Segal


btkerman@...
 

I believe this comes down to a miscommunication about the original question.
If the intention is to identify the Hebrew/Yiddish name that was most likely given to an ancestor who's secular name is known then Oded's method is likely not going to be helpful. However if the intention is to understand the most accurate translation/equivalent of a secular name (for instance in order to give a child a modern Hebrew/Yiddish name in memory of someone who's secular name is known) then Oded is correct that most of the historically common names had little to do with the secular names they  were paired with besides often sharing a first sound.
Future questions like this would be clearer if the purpose of the inquiry is stated.
Binyamin Kerman
Baltimore MD


Oded
 

Was the subject:  The way our ancestors looked at the question [of names] ? - NO.
 
Someone asked for the equivalent Hebrew name for Clara. Other aspects are irrelevant to the question.
 
Bruria means 'chosen by God'' as if to say that God picked up that person.
 
Oded Freilich. 


Diane Jacobs
 

You might try Mollie, Malka, Mali, etc.
Different names I have come across on my family tree.

Diane Jacobs



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Marcia Segal <joule@...>
Date: 9/13/20 9:19 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Equivalent Hebrew Name for Clara #names

The long discussion is because this is how threads unspool in a discussion. Nobody got injured, and people want to share.

One of my great-grandmothers was Chaia on the passenger list, and Clara in the US Federal censuses. Her daughter Chana became Annie. What I haven't figured out is what another great-grandmother's name may have been. On her grave marker it's Machli, but that's the masculine for of Machla. The only thing I can think of is that the final "ee" sound was a nickname of sorts, the way Loretta (as in Loretta Lynn) became Loretty to her family, and as above Chana became Annie but may have been Anna at some point.

Marcia Segal
--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Elynn Boss
 

My Grandmother was Chai Devora Brucha with a nickname of Chaika.  Her English name was Clara.

Elynn Boss