finding record of name changes #names #records


Sheryl Stahl
 

Hi,
I know that my family's name did not get changed at  Ellis Island. But how do I find a record of a name change in the United States (either New York City or New Haven Connecticut)

thanks

Sheryl


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Sheryl Stahl (Los Angeles)

Suwalki (RAKOVSKI, OKRAGLINSKI,) Wizajni (RAKOVSKI) Kalvarja
(FRIEDMAN, SUWALSKI),
Odessa (STESSEL) Pervomaysk (STESSEL)  Grzymalow (LANDAU) Kolomyya (STAHL,
SCHMERTZLER, KRAIMER) Chernivtsi (STAHL)

 


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Sheryl Stahl (Los Angeles)

Suwalki (RAKOVSKI, OKRAGLINSKI,) Wizajni (RAKOVSKI) Kalvarja
(FRIEDMAN, SUWALSKI),
Odessa (STESSEL) Pervomaysk (STESSEL)  Grzymalow (LANDAU) Kolomyya (STAHL,
SCHMERTZLER, KRAIMER) Chernivtsi (STAHL)

 


Paul Silverstone
 

My grandfather changed his name in 1908.   When he applied for a passport in 1927 he had to show a
court order changing his name, and that shows on his application.   This was in New York but his next
child born in 1909 showed the new name on his birth certificate.
 
Paul Silverstone
West Vancouver, BC


Robert Hanna
 

It may never have been changed through the courts.  My grandfather's name changed almost every time he (or someone for him) filled out a new document.  I changed my name in 1979 without going through the court system.  I have two social security cards with different names but the same SS number.  My passport and driver's license are under my new name.  It may be a bit harder to do that with all the current security issues, but it was not that difficult in the 20th century or earlier.

Robert Hanna
NYC

Chanan/Hanan/Hanne/Gane (Warsaw); Blumenblat (Sarnaki); Karasik, Thomashow, Cohen (Babruysk); Rubinstein, Bunderoff, Pastilnik, Nemoyten, Diskin (Minsk).


Sherri Bobish
 

Hi Sheryl,

Most people just started using a different name, whether it be first name and/or surname, and there is no legal paperwork.

Some people did use the naturalization process to change their name, and that would be noted on their nat papers, if they did so.

Some people did go to court and get their name legally changed.

It seems you are saying that you believe the surname the family used in The U.S. is not the surname they used before coming here? 

Are you trying to figure out the original surname?  If so, there are methods to attempt to do this, even if they didn't legally change the name.

Do you know what town they came from originally?

Good luck in your search,

Sherri Bobish


jbonline1111@...
 

The spelling of my mother's surname changed after she was born, as did that of her first name.  The new spelling was standardized, one might say, when my grandfather was naturalized in the 1930s and is used to this day.

My father and his brothers changed their last name without going through the courts in the 1940s.  Because Dad did not report the change to Social Security, he had to get an affidavit from someone who knew him with both names before he could draw on his Social Security retirement, a minor issue.  But his new name was used in all his US Army documents dating back to 1941. 

There is no requirement to have a name "legally" changed as long as it is not used to defraud.  
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Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC