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given name Chashele #latvia #names


rv Kaplan
 

Can anyone tell me about the given name Chashele - for someone who was born in 19th century Lithuania.  Is it Yiddish, corresponding to a Hebrew name?  Seems to refer in my family to my grandfather's sister Ray. I don't know if she was maybe Rochel Chashele?
 
thanks
 
Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland
 
 KAPLAN, FAYN, FEIN, FINE, BARSD, GRADMAN

- Ariogala, Josvainiai, Kedainiai, Krakes, Seta, Veliuona, Grinkiskis, Lithuania


lydgateaction@...
 

Is it not perhaps Chavala -- .חבלה Although the Hebrew meaning of the name Chavala is "life", in Yiddish it sometimes also meant "a little bird" I think. 
 
I'm no expert but I can see possible confusion in the lettering and transliteration /sin/ vs /shin/ and /bet vs /vet/
 
In Fiddler on the roof, Tevya sings a song ``Little bird, little Chavala'' (about his daughter Chavala). 
 
"Little Bird, Little Chavala
I don't understand what's happening today
everything is all a blur
Gentle and kind and affectionate
The sweet little bird you were
Chavala, Chavala
Little Bird, Little Chavala....

Aubrey Blumsohn
Sheffield, UK


Marcel Apsel
 

Harvey,

 

It might be a diminutive of Chasya

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium

 

If you don’t remember me, I think we had together Friday night dinner in 2018 at the Warsaw Seminar together with Bill Gladstone.

 

Marcel


Jules Feldman
 

There is a Hebrew name Chasha which exists among the ultra-Orthodox in
Jerusalem

Chashele is a diminutive form of the name.

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


rv Kaplan
 

Thanks - but don't think so.  I'm wondering if it is a diminutive of Channa - which still wouldn't fit in with the family names - who knows?

Harvey Kaplan

On Sat, 31 Oct 2020 at 22:59, lydgateaction via groups.jewishgen.org <lydgateaction=btinternet.com@...> wrote:
Is it not perhaps Chavala -- .חבלה Although the Hebrew meaning of the name Chavala is "life", in Yiddish it sometimes also meant "a little bird" I think. 
 
I'm no expert but I can see possible confusion in the lettering and transliteration /sin/ vs /shin/ and /bet vs /vet/
 
In Fiddler on the roof, Tevya sings a song ``Little bird, little Chavala'' (about his daughter Chavala). 
 
"Little Bird, Little Chavala
I don't understand what's happening today
everything is all a blur
Gentle and kind and affectionate
The sweet little bird you were
Chavala, Chavala
Little Bird, Little Chavala....

Aubrey Blumsohn
Sheffield, UK


Sally Bruckheimer
 

My first thought was that Chashele was Haskiel, a man's name.  But you want it to be a woman's name. Women often did not have a Hebrew name, but only Yiddish and / or secular names. One of my 2g grandmothers had 20 children in a tiny town, and her name is different on each birth record; My ggrandmother, her daughter was mostly Rachel in records in the US - this was also one of her mother's names; on her marriage record in NYC, she was Regina. She had a sister born Regina, and this was another of their mother's names. So go figure.

Are you sure Chashele isn't Rachele? Where did you find Chashele?

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

"Can anyone tell me about the given name Chashele"


Jay Paul
 

Harvey, 
You asked about the given name Chashele for someone born in 19th century Lithuania. According to Alexander Beider’s A Dictionary of Ashkenazic Given Names, Khasele is a Yiddish variant of the name Khane (or Chane), apparently a diminutive form of the derivation Khase. Perhaps that is the origin of your relative's name. 
Sincerely,
Jay

Jay Paul
San Francisco, CA 94117
 
Researching: SUMBERG (Pilvishok/Pilviskiai, Lithuania), LANGERT (Pilviskiai & elsewhere in Suwalki gubernia); KAHN (Ranstadt, Germany), GOTTLIEB (Grebenau, Germany), PAVLOVSKIY / PAVLOVSKY (Mala Antonivka, Bila Tserkiv, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia, Ukraine), LEVITSKIY / LEVITZSKY (Yasnohorodka, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia), KOTLER (Vistytis, Suwalki gubernia, Lithuania; Traby, Belarus), LEIBSON (Lithuania), WOLF, SCHWARZ and STERN (presumed from Austro-Hungary).

--
Jay Paul, PhD
San Francisco CA 94117
Researching: SUMBERG (Pilvishok/Pilviskiai, Lithuania), LANGERT (Pilviskiai & elsewhere in Suwalki gubernia); KAHN (Ranstadt, Germany), GOTTLIEB (Grebenau, Germany), PAVLOVSKIY / PAVLOVSKY (Mala Antonivka, Bila Tserkiv, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia, Ukraine), LEVITSKIY / LEVITZSKY (Yasnohorodka, Vasyl’kiv, Kyiv gubernia), KOTLER (Vistytis, Suwalki gubernia), WOLF (Austro-Hungary).


sharon yampell
 

My great great grandfather’s sister in law was named Chashe; looks like a diminutive of that…

 

Sharon F. Yampell

Voorhees, NJ  USA

GenealogicalGenie@...

 

From: Sally Bruckheimer via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Saturday, October 31, 2020 8:42 PM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] given name Chashele #latvia #names

 

My first thought was that Chashele was Haskiel, a man's name.  But you want it to be a woman's name. Women often did not have a Hebrew name, but only Yiddish and / or secular names. One of my 2g grandmothers had 20 children in a tiny town, and her name is different on each birth record; My ggrandmother, her daughter was mostly Rachel in records in the US - this was also one of her mother's names; on her marriage record in NYC, she was Regina. She had a sister born Regina, and this was another of their mother's names. So go figure.

Are you sure Chashele isn't Rachele? Where did you find Chashele?

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

"Can anyone tell me about the given name Chashele"

 


David Barrett
 

Whilst the question implies that Chashele is a Lithuanian  derivative there is a Dutch name I believe Hashele  which means 'little egg'

Could there be any connection?

Regards

David Barrett


Marcel Apsel
 

A diminutive of Channa should be Cahnele.

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium


Marcel Apsel
 

Don’t forget that Jewish children from the 19th century onwards had gentile names for civilian authorities and Jewish names for internal Jewish communal use and for boys especially a necessary name needed to be called for a Thora blessing.

Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe who did not have specific gentile names start to use them when immigrating to the US.  Examples who are not always the same:  Mordechai can become Max, Gittel can become Gussie, Rivka can become Rebecca, Rose,  Schmiel became Sam and the classical Sean Ferguson was originating from Russia with a family name something like Forgatson (don’t catch me if this name is a little bit different), but the ‘Shoyn fergessen’ – (I forgot) was a classical Jewish joke in the 1930s.

On the other hand it often happens that people had two different first names and we see this in the files of JRI-Poland where once a mother is called Malka, a second time Channa and another time Channa Malka.   And all 3 versions of those first names were used.  So I won’t wonder if that person would use the name Annie for Channa and Regina for Malka for different purposes in the US.

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium


Marcel Apsel
 

I don’t agree that Chasele is a diminutive of Chana; it should be Chanele or we should have somebody who has problems to pronounce an n; another very doubtful explanation might be that there were two girls named Channa and to differentiate both of them, one might be called Chanele and the other one Chasele.  But basically Chasele (little Chasya) is not a diminutive for Chana, but well for Chasya, a first name mainly used in very religious circles.   My neighbor’s daughter is called Chassie, another diminutive of Chasya.

 

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium


rv Kaplan
 

Thanks

Makes me think that my great aunt Ray/Rachel may have had Chasha as a middle name in Hebrew and been called that as a child. No one around now to ask.

Harvey Kaplan

On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 at 00:40, Jules Feldman <jfeldman@...> wrote:
There is a Hebrew name Chasha which exists among the ultra-Orthodox in
Jerusalem

Chashele is a diminutive form of the name.

Jules Feldman
Kibbutz Yizreel


rv Kaplan
 

Thanks, but nothing to suggest any Dutch connection - just coincidence.
 
Harvey Kaplan

On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 at 07:57, David Barrett <david@...> wrote:

Whilst the question implies that Chashele is a Lithuanian  derivative there is a Dutch name I believe Hashele  which means 'little egg'

Could there be any connection?

Regards

David Barrett

 

 


Marcel Apsel
 

Never heard that name before  and I am Dutch speaking.   But in the Netherlands you find sometimes names based on very local traditions.  I can learn every day.

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium

 

 


rv Kaplan
 

Thanks Marcel - could be - and yes, I remember you from Warsaw!
 
Harvey Kaplan

On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 at 00:40, Marcel Apsel <marcap@...> wrote:

Harvey,

 

It might be a diminutive of Chasya

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium

 

If you don’t remember me, I think we had together Friday night dinner in 2018 at the Warsaw Seminar together with Bill Gladstone.

 

Marcel

 

 


ryabinkym@...
 

It most possible is a Hashe (Khashe).  In Russian language they used so called "Diminutive" form: Hashele, Moishele, Sorele, most for a little baby or saying with love.

Michael Ryabinky


rv Kaplan
 

I know about immigrants having a number of first names, potentially.  My great great grandfather from Josvainiai, Lithuania was Tzvi ben Yisroel Fayn.  In the 1874 Revision List for Josvainiai, he is listed as Girsh, which is really Hirsch (diminutive is Herschel).  In Scotland, he became Harry.

Writing in a letter, he is speaking about his granddaughter in Glasgow - and at that time he only had 2 local granddaughters, Ray and Dora - both born in Glasgow.  Chana is not a name I have seen in this family, but it's possible Ray or Dora had Chana or Chasha as a middle name and that's what he called her.  What's strange is that no one else has ever mentioned that name and no document I have seen mentions a middle name.

Harvey Kaplan
Glasgow, Scotland

On Sun, 1 Nov 2020 at 11:34, Marcel Apsel <marcap@...> wrote:

I don’t agree that Chasele is a diminutive of Chana; it should be Chanele or we should have somebody who has problems to pronounce an n; another very doubtful explanation might be that there were two girls named Channa and to differentiate both of them, one might be called Chanele and the other one Chasele.  But basically Chasele (little Chasya) is not a diminutive for Chana, but well for Chasya, a first name mainly used in very religious circles.   My neighbor’s daughter is called Chassie, another diminutive of Chasya.

 

 

Marcel Apsel

Antwerpen, Belgium


Cheryl Lynn Blum
 

My great-aunt, (by marriage to my great-uncle - and what a thrill it was to find them after thinking they had died in the Shoah) was named Chasye. The diminutive would have been Chaseleh. 
 
They came from Bystritsa in Vilna (Lithuania/Belarus). 
 
Cheryl Lynn Blum 
New York. 

 


Leya Aronson
 

Hi, Chasha is a Yiddish name. The addition of le at the end is a a diminutive of little---and this often seems to stick even with age. We have several
named Chasha in our family.
Leya Aronson, 
Toronto, Canada