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Handwritten notations on Ship Manifests #general #records


Gail H. Marcus
 

I found a 1920 ship manifest for a relative that handwritten notations for almost every family group on the page.  I've looked at several articles about such notations and can't find anything that explains this particular format.  The entries are of the form #-######  ##/##/##.  In most cases, the first digit is 2.  The 6 digit number (in one case, it is 7 digits) vary all over the place.  The final numbers look like a date, but the puzzle is that most of the dates, if they are dates, are in the 40s, but this manifest is from 1920.  I would have guessed these might be passport dates or something, but the fact that they are in the 40s, and almost every family group shows such an entry has me puzzled.  I've attached the page for review.  Can anyone explain these notations. 

Thanks for any help on this, and a safe and Happy New Year to all!

Gail Marcus


Susan&David
 

Your question has come up on this forum before. See the explanation of manifest markings here:
https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/Manifests/

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 12/30/2020 10:19 AM, Gail H. Marcus via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I found a 1920 ship manifest for a relative that handwritten notations for almost every family group on the page.  I've looked at several articles about such notations and can't find anything that explains this particular format.  The entries are of the form #-######  ##/##/##.  In most cases, the first digit is 2.  The 6 digit number (in one case, it is 7 digits) vary all over the place.  The final numbers look like a date, but the puzzle is that most of the dates, if they are dates, are in the 40s, but this manifest is from 1920.  I would have guessed these might be passport dates or something, but the fact that they are in the 40s, and almost every family group shows such an entry has me puzzled.  I've attached the page for review.  Can anyone explain these notations. 

Thanks for any help on this, and a safe and Happy New Year to all!

Gail Marcus

Attachments:



dbpdallas@...
 

Hi Gail,

The numbers to which you refer are likely dates/file numbers for petitions to naturalization. Petition reviewers referred to the original manifest to assure when the applicant entered the country.

David Passman
Dallas, TX


Marian
 

Gail,

David P. is correct the annotations relate to applications for naturalization, but the numbers are NOT the petition numbers (they are application for a certificate of arrival numbers).  These annotations have three pieces of information, two of which can help you.  The three data points are the prefix number, the application number, and the date.  

The first (prefix) number indicates the US naturalization district where the application was filed.  Above, David Rosen posted the link to a site where one can find a table where you can translate the number into a geographic district (as of the date in the annotation).

The date annotated is the date the manifest record was checked, telling you (approximately) when their application was processed.  The actual date of naturalization can be weeks, months, or even years later.

Thus annotations such as you describe and are seen on the example you shared can help one reach conclusions like "this immigrant was living in the St Louis District and trying to naturalize in 1935" or "that immigrant lived in the Boston District and was trying to naturalize in 1941."  

If you do later find the naturalization petition, it should include a blank for "Certificate of Arrival No. ____ filed" and that certificate of arrival (c/a) number should match the application number annotated on the manifest.  Matching those numbers tells you the US Gov't believed the person listed on the manifest and the person named on the naturalization petition were one and the same person.  

Marian Smith