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Hebrew Translation of Gravestone - ROSENBERG, NATHAN (NISEL) #translation


Deborah
 

My great-grandfather, Nisel Rozenberg (Nathan Rosenberg), came to the US in 1902 and is buried at Washington Cemetery NY. The inscription on his grave is very long and descriptive and I have not been able to get a translation. I know he died because of an accident - his death certificate says something about a head injury. I would appreciate it if someone could translate this for me. Thank you.

Deborah Miller, Annandale, VA


fredelfruhman
 

Here lies

 

“For these do I weep; my eye, my eye, is dripping water” upon the passing

 

of my husband and our father, the dear and holy one, who was killed in the 65th

 

year of his life, and the crown of our heads was taken from us; his glorious name was

 

[an abbreviation*], NISAN, son of [the rabbi?*] Michael, may he rest in peace, Rosenberg.

 

He was called to Heaven, in the Garden of Eden, on the 29th day of the month of Kislev of the year 5679.

 

May his soul be bound up in the bond of life.

 

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The phrase on the first line comes from the Book of Lamentations.

 

* There are abbreviations in front of both his name and his father’s name that MIGHT indicate that one, or both, of them were rabbis.  The first abbreviation is a slight variation of one that usually translates to “our teacher, the rabbi”.  The problem with such abbreviations is that they can theoretically represent a number of interpretations.  I would not conclude that either of them were rabbis, without verification from an additional source.  (By the way, by “rabbi” I do not mean that they necessarily had a pulpit, only that they had completed rabbinical school and received ordination.)

 

The 29th of Kislev, 5679, began at sunset on December 2nd, 1918, and ended at sunset on the 3rd.

 

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In case you are not aware:  jewishgen includes a wonderful “ViewMate” feature where you can post images, including gravestones, and receive translations and interpretations from multiple helpers.  I recommend it.


--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


fredelfruhman
 

I did not look at the English part of the stone earlier, so I now want to point out that there is a discrepancy of 2-3 days between the Hebrew and the secular dates.

If the 5th of December is correct, then the equivalent Hebrew dates are the 2nd of Tevet (if he died before sunset) and the 3rd of Tevet (if he died after sunset).
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


David Barrett
 

I do not understand this response as it is written quite clearly that he died in the month of KISLEV

David Barrett


yitschok@...
 

Note the title "holy" which is used either for an actual holy person like a holy Rabbi etc., or for a martyr who was killed for being a Jew.

As it clearly states that he was killed, I assume the latter is the reason for the title.

However, in the case of a martyr, the name is usually followed by "may God revenge his blood", which does not appear on this tombstone. 

---
Yitschok Margareten 


Deborah
 

FREDEL, THANK YOU AGAIN FOR YOUR HELP.

I pulled my great grandfather's death certificate and found out that the date of death reflected on the tombstone is incorrect. According to the death certificate, he died December 3
1918 at 10:05 am. The death certificate also indicates that he died of a fractured skull, intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic shock noting "accidental." He died at St. Marks Hospital.

I am still clueless where I would find any articles./obituaries where I could find out more detail. Yiddush Newspaper? local newspaper? Any suggestions.

Thank you. Have an easy fast.  Deborah Miller


fredelfruhman
 

Reply to David Barrett,

Yes, the stone does "clearly" say that he died in Kislev.  In the English text, it says just as "clearly" that he died on the 5th of December, which would put the date in Tevet.

I was merely pointing out this discrepancy.

The original poster has now pointed out that the secular date was the one in error, so Kislev it is.

Have a Gmar Chatimah Tovah.

--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA


fredelfruhman
 

Ms. Miller,

You are very welcome.

I'm afraid that I don't have any good suggestions (other than:  google like mad) for learning more.  I'm sure that others here will have more concrete ideas.

Have an easy and meaningful fast.

Fredel Fruhman
--
Fredel Fruhman
Brooklyn, New York, USA