Topics

"His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names


MARC M COHEN
 

Shel,
 
Thanks for those two great name change chronologies (Bercovici & Goldstein).
 
I have a couple of similar surname mutation sequences — all self-administered, we believe — although without your level of detail:
 
Iacovici >> Janucci >> Jacobson (from Frumasica, Romania)
 
Haimovici >> Haimowitz (from Iase, Romania).
 
Cheers,
 
Marc

--
Marc M. Cohen, Los Gatos, California, USA

BARAK/CANTORCZY: Khotin, Bessarabia; Strorozhinets, Bukovina, Ukraine
CHOMITZ/HAMETZ: Ionina (Janina), Greece; Ignatovka, Ukraine; Kiev Gubernia, Ukraine
COHEN: Dinovitsi (Dunayevtsy) Ukraine; Roman/Tirgu Frumos, Romania
KORNITZKY: Kiev Gubernia, Stepnitz/Stepantsy, Ukraine
RÎBNER: Storozhinetz, Costesti (Costyntsi), Drachinets, Cabesti, Bukovina, Ukraine
ROSENBERG: Tirgu Frumos, Roman, Romania; ISRAEL
WEININGER: Cabesti, Costesti, Drachinets, Czernowitz, Bukovina, Ukraine


polly.goldberg@...
 

Yes, ignorance of American law is exactly why my great-grandfather believed that he was stuck with "Berg" when his name was "Bershadsky." By the time he was made aware of the fact that he could have kept his Russian surname, he figured it would be too much of a headache to go back to it. I'm still trying to find sth with his original name on it (that would be relevant), but what I have of his papers is inadequate. So far.


susiekrumholz@...
 

My grandfather's last name was "Yellen" but his family that came at different times were named "Levin"!  Think we might be related????


tom
 

your arguments are wonderful, but like the little old lady said in the fast food ad, "show me the beef".
 
please provide us with just one single properly documented case, out of all the millions of immigrants who landed at ellis island, where an american official changed the immigrant's name.  it shouldn't be difficult.
 
 
....... tom klein, toronto
 
 

At 3:07 -0700 19/7/20, main@... wrote:
8a.
Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island" #names
From: YaleZuss@...
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2020 23:56:48 EDT
Karen Silver and Philip Trauring, who writes the blog where Avivah Pinski found another claim against involuntary name changes (https://bloodandfrogs.com/2011/05/name-changes-at-ellis-island.html),
 
[snip!]
 
your ancestors, you don't discard anything they tell you unless and until you have actual proof that what they told you is wrong. NINC appears to have originated to motivate the wholesale discarding of family narratives, which would destroy whatever data they include; it's conceptually not that different from burning down an archive.
 
Yale Zussman


Jules Levin
 

Tom, I think the Ellis Island meme now is recognized as false for how it
is usually understood--a US official caused the name change.  Before I
started my research in my own family, all my older cousins explained our
change as "Ellis Island", even though all the family was in the US by
1891--before Ellis Island was up and running.  By this they
meant--involuntary change by the government.  What else could they have
been thinking.  But now those trying to save the honor of their
grandparents are reinterpreting the meme as any kind of change--advice
by a fellow immigrant, a slip of the pen, any port of entry in any
year--as the deep meaning of "Ellis Island".  Basically, it means we
have won the argument--no changes were made at Ellis Island by the
government!

Jules Levin


On 7/27/2020 8:19 AM, tom wrote:
your arguments are wonderful, but like the little old lady said in the
fast food ad, "show me the beef".
please provide us with just one single properly documented case, out
of all the millions of immigrants who landed at ellis island, where an
american official changed the immigrant's name.  it shouldn't be
difficult.
....... tom klein, toronto
At 3:07 -0700 19/7/20, main@... wrote:

8a.

*Re: "His name was changed at Ellis Island"* #names
From: YaleZuss@...
<mailto:YaleZuss@...?subject=Re:%20%22His%20name%20was%20changed%20at%20Ellis%20Island%22>
Date: Sat, 18 Jul 2020 23:56:48 EDT

Karen Silver and Philip Trauring, who writes the blog where Avivah
Pinski found another claim against involuntary name changes
(https://bloodandfrogs.com/2011/05/name-changes-at-ellis-island.html),

[snip!]

your ancestors, you don't discard anything they tell you unless
and until you have actual proof that what they told you is wrong.
NINC appears to have originated to motivate the wholesale
discarding of family narratives, which would destroy whatever data
they include; it's conceptually not that different from burning
down an archive.

Yale Zussman


YaleZuss@...
 

Tom, 

If your comment was addressed to me, please be advised that the absence of any legislation addressing this issue, pro or con, guarantees that there won't be any written documentary evidence of the kind you appear to want.  Any claim that this result must be interpreted to mean that no such involuntary changes took place is the result of a logical error known as an "argument from ignorance;" you may be familiar with this kind of error in the form "The absence of evidence is evidence of absence." 
 
Before the absence of a certain kind of evidence can be meaningful, there must be a reason why it should exist if the phenomenon it documents took place.  The absence of legislation requiring such documentation means there is no reason to expect to find any, regardless of whether the phenomenon exists, so the mere absence of the documents you want proves nothing whatsoever.
 
In the absence of any actual case establishing why involuntary name-changes could not have happened, the best evidence on this are the various family narratives asserting that it did.  The "No involuntary name-changes" meme has undoubtedly already caused large numbers of these narratives to be abandoned, taking with them whatever genealogical information they contained, some of it quite possibly not available anywhere else.
 
In this context, your little old lady would be holding an ice-cream cone, and her "Where's the beef?" would be incomprehensible.  
 
Yale Zussman


bobmalakoff@...
 

The name change idea was perpetuated in the Godfather movie.  Vito says to the immigration agent "I am Vito Andolini from Corleone" and the agent writes down Vito Corleone.  Many families changed their name on the own.  My maternal great grandfather came over as Morris Shimishelovitz.  Within his lifetime the name became Similovitz and then they said the heck with it, it's Simmons.
Bob Malakoff