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Is there such a place as Palestine, Russia??? #galicia #russia


evagjuni@...
 

Hello all!

I recently found a US census document for an ancestor of mine which listed the birthplace of his father as Palestine Russia.  Google searches have come up with nothing. Any ideas for where this may have been referring to?  This ancestor would have later moved to Stanislau Austria (now Ivano Frankivsk, Ukraine) as that is where his son was born before coming to the US. 


Thank you for any help or advice you can provide,
Eva Stevenson


Mark Halpern
 

Hi Eva:

In Galicia, there is a town named Palesnica. Its Jewish vital records were registered in nearby Czchów - https://www.jewishgen.org/Communities/community.php?usbgn=-498188. These towns are now in Poland not that close to Stanislawow/Ivano Frankivsk. 

More interesting is the town of Palestyna 10 miles from Stanislawow, Poland, east of Warsaw. See attached map. 

Mark Halpern
JRI-Poland


 

On 2020-09-08 12:30 pm, evagjuni@... wrote:

Hello all!

I recently found a US census document for an ancestor of mine which listed the birthplace of his father as Palestine Russia.  Google searches have come up with nothing. Any ideas for where this may have been referring to?  This ancestor would have later moved to Stanislau Austria (now Ivano Frankivsk, Ukraine) as that is where his son was born before coming to the US. 


Thank you for any help or advice you can provide,
Eva Stevenson


Dr.Josef ASH
 

Eva,
I have found town Plastun on the map. It lays in the far-far East of Russia, on the Japan sea. 
from the linguistic point in may work: PaLeSTiN=PLaSTuN.
the problem is - it had got its name in 1926 and was (and still is) a fishmen village

Josef ASH, Israel


Kenneth Ryesky
 

I do not like to cite to Wikipedia, but my time is now pressed to do other projects.
 
Never mind the Arabs whose total life aspirations are to exterminate Jews, "Plastun" in Russian or Ukrainian refers to a Cossack military unit.
 
"The name derives from the word plast, "sheet" via an expression "to lay like a sheet", i.e., flat and low. The word "plastoon" also can refer to a member of a Ukrainian Scouting organization Plast, named after the original plastoons."
 
 
-- Ken Ryesky
Petach Tikva, ISRAEL
 

--
Ken Ryesky,  Petach Tikva, Israel     kenneth.ryesky@...


Alexander Sharon
 

1. Late 19th century "Słownik Geograficzny..." (The Geographical Dictionary of The Kingdom of Poland) lists four entries for villages named Palestyna located in Russian Poland in the following        regions: Łódź, Częstochowa, Węgrów and Kielce
    
2. Modern Poland, identifies nine places named Palestyna, as an integral parts of the following villages

·        Palestyna – część wsi Ruda-Huta w woj. lubelskim, w pow. chełmskim, w gminie Ruda-Huta

·        Palestyna – część wsi Pilaszków w woj. łódzkim, w pow. łowickim, w gminie Łowicz

·        Palestyna – część wsi Glinnik w woj. łódzkim, w pow. zgierskim, w gminie Zgierz

·        Palestyna – część wsi Rososz w woj. mazowieckim, w pow. grójeckim w gminie Chynów

·        Palestyna – kolonia wsi Bilminy w woj. podlaskim, w pow. sokólskim, w gminie Kuźnica

·        Palestyna – część wsi Mirachowo w woj. pomorskim, w pow. kartuskim, w gminie Kartuzy

·        Palestyna – część wsi Kołaczkowice w woj. świętokrzyskim, w pow. buskim, w gminie Busko-Zdrój

·        Palestyna – część wsi Gronowo w woj. warmińsko-mazurskim, w pow. mrągowskim w gminie Mrągowo

·        Palestyna, obecnie Karolina – wieś w województwie śląskim, w woj. śląskim, w pow. częstochowskim, w gminie Rędziny


3.  Palestyna In Wilno/Belarus

Part of the Jewish town Worniany (Wilno district), currently known as town Vornyany in Belarus identifies Palestyna

4.  Palestyna in a "proper" Russian lands

A locality listed in Rostov-na Donu Oblast' as Новая Палестина, apparently it had no Jewish residents

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor


Norbert Steiner
 

Under Czarist Russia and even under Stalin the Russian government was looking for a place for the Jews. They finally decided to allocate a large segment of Siberia - on the map it looks like near Irkutsk but is probably hundreds of miles away - and even renamed many towns with Yiddish names. Many Jews moved there voluntarily and many more were forcibly relocated. I don’t know what happened to the Jews but I know that many towns there still have Yiddish names. Searching for towns in Russia may be easier if you know this. 
--
May You Meet Your Responsibilities 
With Love, Insight, and Creativity 
Norbert Natan Steiner


Kalman Appel
 

The area you may be referring to is Birobijan, which was originally created to be an autonomous Jewish region within Russia. It still exists today and although there are few Jews left there, the official languages of this region are Russian and Yiddish to this day, and even the (majority) non-Jewish population speaks Yiddish.
 
An interesting sidebar note:  A popular folk singing group in the late ‘50’s and ‘60’s called The Limeliters, used to perform a song called Zhankoya. Of course they “Americanized” what I believe was originally a Russian folk ballad, but the song itself was about this Jewish enclave in Russia.  The song can be heard on YouTube.  One of the versions available there even has a pre-song explanatory intro (although it does not mention Birobijan by name).
--
Kalman Appel


boris
 

Zhankoya refers to the town of Dzhankoj in Northern Crimea. There were many Jewish agricultural colonies there in the 1930's. Nothing to do with Birobijan and the Jewish Autonomous Region.


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FAST Genealogy Service
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Alexander Sharon
 

Hi again, folks.

Palestyna is listed in JRI-P database 266 times, as birth place or residence.
It shows mainly in historical Galicia regions:
62 times in Lwow Province,
145 times in Stanislawow and 24 times in Tarnopol Provinces.

In addition, there are Palestyna listings in Bielsko-Biala post Holocaust AD 1945 (?) list and in the JDC Vilna refugees lists and JHI (Jewish Historical Institute) passport collection.
During the period of 1925 to 1948 residents of the Palestine Mandate were issued mandatory Palestine passports. Some folks have traveled to Poland, hence the vital documents such as marriage were issued. Hope this resolves Palestine issue.

Alexander Sharon
JGFF editor