Jena in Ritschenwalde - Re: Compound last names from Detmold, Lippe Germany #germany


Corinna Woehrl (nee Goslar)
 

Hello Lew and Listreaders,
 
You probably won't find the surname Jena in Ritschenwalde before 1840, since in Posen the obligatory adoption of surnames for Jews was only introduced in 1833.
 
It is very unlikely, that the bearers of the name in Detmold/Westphalia should be related to those in Ritschenwalde. In almost every larger Jewish community, there will have been people with the name Jena, just as the surnames Berlin/er, Hamburg/er, Frankfurt/er, or others are common (e.g., also my maiden name Goslar). Simply because former places of origin were chosen as family names when the name was adopted.
 
For further research, I would first search the Polish Archival platform:
https://www.szukajwarchiwach.gov.pl/en/wyszukiwarka?p_p_id=Result&p_p_lifecycle=0&p_p_state=normal&p_p_mode=view&_Result_delta=20&_Result_resetCur=false&_Result_cur=2
 
If the link fails to work, try:
https://www.szukajwarchiwach.gov.pl/en/strona_glowna 
and enter 'Ryczywól' as the search term and select 'scans only'.
 
If in doubt, I would write to the regional polish archive to see if they have any specific records. There are only fractions of archival records online in Poland and Germany, others will have to be searched locally.
 
It is essential first to orientate yourself on the facts and the known regions, otherwise, the search will very quickly lead you astray.
 
On the following German website of the non-profit association 'compgen.de' the name Jena in Ritschenwalde can be found
https://ofb.genealogy.net/namelist.php?ofb=juden_nw&ort=Ritschenwalde&e=geburt&sort_by=name&lang=de
 
Here is (in German - perhaps read with google-translate) information about the Jewish community in Ritschenwalde
https://www.xn--jdische-gemeinden-22b.de/index.php/gemeinden/p-r/2254-ritschenwalde-posen
 
Incidentally, it was very common after the name adoption that the previous patronymic naming was retained for the first names, i.e. the patronymic became the middle name. 
It also became customary over time to choose a more "German" first name for the children and a second more traditionally Jewish one, which was perhaps only noted in the lists of the Jewish community.
 
I sincerely hope that one of the tips is helpful.
Good luck with your further search
 
Corinna (Wöhrl, née Goslar) from Hoisdorf, near Hamburg, Germany