Topics

Jewish refugees in Tashkent during WWII - Moroz

Ellen
 

Below is a copy of a registration card I found on the website of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum awhile back.  It is from a collection called "Registration cards of Jewish refugees in Tashkent, Uzbekistan during WWII."  The translation indicates that the card was issued to Aleksandr Semenovich Moroz, who I believe was my great-uncle.



I'm not familiar with Tashkent and its role during WWII, and I haven't found any subsequent records for my relative.  What happened to these refugees after the war?  Where could I find more information?  There doesn't seem to be anything else available at the USHMM or Yad Vashem.

Thanks.     
--
Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)

Anastasiia Petrovskaia-Kaminskaia
 

Hi!
As far as I know, a lot of Jewish refugees were evacuated to Tashkent during WWII. Also, I've seen lists of evacuated Jews to this area, maybe there you'll found more information about your relative 

Rose Feldman
 

Many Jews managed to flee from the Ukraine as the Nazis advanced. My cousins reached Tashkent. After the war they went to other places. I don't know if they went back to their original homes or to other places. I know one cousin gave birth to her second son in Moscow a number of years after the war.

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Help us index more records at http://igra.csindexing.com

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl


--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

solkeys@thejnet.com
 

Hi,

Where can I see this list?

Solomon

 

 

On 02/23/20 10:01 AM, Anastasiia Petrovskaia-Kaminskaia wrote:

Hi!
As far as I know, a lot of Jewish refugees were evacuated to Tashkent during WWII. Also, I've seen lists of evacuated Jews to this area, maybe there you'll found more information about your relative 

mvayser@...
 

Tashkent was often a transition point, not a final destination.  In this case the "current address" field (lower left) has Tashkent oblast, Ordzhenikidze rayon, village Troitskoe, Lagernaya st 59.  Pre-evacuation address is Moscow (center of the screen). Current job is listed as a tailor at the Chirchik (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chirchiq) military supplies store.  Here is a link to Google Maps to show Troitskoe (now Troitsk ?) between Tashkent and Chirchik - https://goo.gl/maps/SyCYdy4fD9HyX5UX6
Typically, the lists of refugees were created in each evacuation locality in 1943.  I am not aware of other lists - refugees returning back to their home towns (with the exception of Polish citizens returning home after the war).  Some people returned home at first opportunity as their towns were cleared out of German, Romanian army units, while others waited until the end of war, in other cases people stayed for a few years after the war or permanently.  It just depends if they had anything/anyone to come back to.

Mike

JudiZimmer
 

I also have a card for a woman I assume is a relative by marriage--same small hometown in Russia, same surname, but I have yet to connect her. Her name was Etka Rotshteyn (Rothstein) from Smiela/Smela Russia (now Ukraine).

Ellen
 

Mike,

Yes, apparently he was (at some point) a tailor in Moscow.  I'm trying to figure out where he was for most of his adult life, before and after WWII.  

Thanks for the translation and link.

Ellen
--
Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)

beckyanderson53@...
 

My relatives, who lived in Odessa, were also evacuated to Tashkent and other points East during the war.  They all returned to Odessa after the war, although my great-grandmother died before they returned.  (My grandparents always said she could not recover from the stress of being displaced.)

Beth Galleto
 

An interesting book about this topic is "To the Tashkent Station, Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War" by Rebecca Manley. The book, published in 2009, is described as "the first in-depth study of this crucial but neglected episode in the history of twentieth-century population displacement, World War II, and the Soviet Union."
I have no affiliation with this author or book and am simply suggesting it as an important resource for those whose relatives lived through the evacuation experience, as did some of mine.

Dave Lichtenstein
 

Hello Everyone - this is an extremely interesting and personal story for me.  As I understand that my late mother then Felicia Heringman ended up there in transit during WWII.  Sadly she went to her grave in 2004 with many secrets - but what I can ascertain is that when Poland was invaded by the Nazis she escaped eastwards only to fall into Soviet hands.  (The Russian invasion of Poland as a result of the Ribbentrop-Stalin pact).  After being arrested she ended up in Siberia and the Stan States including Uzbekistan and then Persia (now Iran).  If there is any information on her during those harrowing years I would appreciate even only her registration in Tashkent, Uzbekistan.  However, I understand, as a matter of survival she changed her persona, age including religion so once again tracing records may prove difficult but I would be happy for some one to prove me wrong.

With best wishes
Dave Lichtenstein
Sydney, Australia

Searching on my mother's side HERING, HERINGMAN, STEIN and the towns of Brzesc-Kujawski, Wloclawek, Pinczow, Kielce, and Warsaw in Poland.

Ellen
 

That's quite a story, Dave!  I hope you are able to find out more about your mother's life and family.

Ellen
--
Researching WEISSMAN/VAYSMAN (Ostropol, Ukraine); MOROZ and ESTRIN/ESTERKIN (Shklov & Bykhov, Belarus); LESSER/LESZEROVITZ, MAIMAN, and BARNETT/BEINHART/BERNHART (Lithuania/Latvia); and ROSENSWEIG/ROSENZWEIG, KIRSCHEN, and SCHWARTZ (Botosani, Romania)

galvin07@...
 

I've been unable to find out what happened to my great-uncle, Shimon Vaisbord (Vaisberg), son of Yehudah Leib Vaisbord, and born in/near Volozhin. I found the attached Tashkent card and wonder if it's him, though the father's name on the card may not be a match. Can anyone tell me any significant information on the card that might indicate if it's my great-uncle?
Thanks.
Irene

Beth Sensue
 

My name is Michael Weinstein. A sister of my maternal grandmother and some members of her family had lived in Ostrog in the Volyn region of Ukraine (formerly Russia and Poland) until June 1941. The Nazis attacked the village and the family escaped by train to Eastern Russia. They survived and after WWIi migrated to Palestine, later Israel. However, I have no information on the whereabouts during the 3-4 years in Eastern Russia. The main two surnames were Guzman (Guz) and Weinshelboim. Does anyone have suggestions on where to find records or information of where Jewish refugees were detained by the Russians during WWII? Thank you?

Michael Weinstein

Dave Lichtenstein
 

Hello Ellen

To a dispassionate out-sider the story may seem interesting.  To my mother (and hence our family) it was critical - a matter of human survival.

With best wishes

Dave
Sydney, Australia

Searching on my mother's side HERING, HERINGMAN, STEIN and the towns of Brzesc-Kujawski, Wloclawek, Pinczow, Kielce, and Warsaw in Poland

Rose Feldman
 

That fact that trains were available to take them away from the invading army was definitely a question of survival. I heard from my father's uncle, who heard from this siblings, that the parents told them to get on the train and get out and that the parents (they were probably grandparents then) were too old to make the trip and would stay behind.

Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy

Help us index more records at http://igra.csindexing.com

Keep up to date on archives, databases and genealogy in general and Jewish and Israeli roots in particular with http://twitter.com/JewDataGenGirl


--
Rose Feldman
Israel Genealogy Research Association
Winner of 2017 IAJGS Award for Volunteer of the Year  
http://genealogy.org.il
http:/facebook.com/israelgenealogy