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Kalonymus

shapma4@...
 

If one's ancestor in Zagare, Lithuania born in mid 1800s had the forename Kalonymus (not the famous tea merchant, Wissotzky!), is it likely that the person was descended from the famous Kalonymus family - or was it a "common" Jewish name akin to Abraha, Moshe or Jacob and nothing special should be read into it?

Marcus S

Hank Mishkoff
 

The forename "Kalman" (Coleman) runs in my family (including my Dad), I'm told that's a common derivation of Kalonymus. My family is from northeastern Poland (Grajewo and Przerosl), near today's border with Lithuania.

David Shapiro
 

It was not a common name, and it was certainly chosen because an ancestor had that name, and so further back. So I would say that it is indeed likely that he descended from that famous family, but you would had to trace your line back close to a thousand years to prove it,which is almost impossible (unless somewhere along the way you found someone had a prepared family tree).

My gggrandfather was Kalman SHMULEVITZ from Panevezys, Lithuanai, and many relatives were named for him.

David Shapiro
Jerusalem

 

ab12cohen@...
 

My wife's greatgrandfather from Plock in Poland had the given name Groniem, a derivative of Heironymous or Kalonymus. It seems relatively common in that area at that time.

Alan Cohen

the_roits@...
 

My middle name is Kalman. My family’s last name was Rojtkopf. While they were from Poland for at least two generations, I believe my great grandfather Kalman, who was a followerer of the Gerer Rebbe, came from Lithuania or Ukraine and was sometimes called Kalonymus.  Does this sound familiar to anyone?

lehrer
 

Hello all,

In my family the name Kalman Kalonimus is not an infrequent name. Also my father was naùmed Kalman Kalonymus.

Here is some information:

According to Rabbi Shmuel Gorr z"l:

Kalonymus קלונימוס

Old Greek.

Kalon - "beautiful;" Nymus - "name". Possibly another attempt at translating the Hebrew name "Shem Tov". The use of this name by Jews is from the Second Temple period.

Kalman (Often used together after the original name form - Kalonymus.

Kalmenka (A branch of the ancient family Yoffe (Yaffe, Joffe, Jaffe, etc.) which means beautiful, had a progenitor called Kalman (beautiful name) Yoffe. They changed their name to Yoffe-Kalmenkes (beautiful, beautiful name). Kalminkes, alone, is also a family name.


According to Alexander Beider:

Kalonymos (Calinymos) was created by the Greek-speaking Jews from the (Judeo-) Greek expression meaning beautiful name. Calonimus is the latinized form. ItsGershon traditional Hebrew spelling is קלונימוס, and despite its non-Hebrew origin it was still considered to be a shem ha-qodesh (Zunz 1876:25). In the Middle Ages, it was a popular name in Italy (cf. for example, the occurrences in the index for Immanuel de Rome 1957, and also in Adler 1907:10, Colorni 1983:70). According to a legend, a family whose head was a bearer of this name migrated from Lucca (northern Italy) to the Rhineland, most likely during the 10th century. Their descendants called Kalonymides were of great importance to the cultural life of the medieval Jewish Rhineland. Numerous religious scholars and poets, primarily from Mainz and Speyer, belonged to that family. Due to the fame of Kalonymides, the given name became popular in Germany. Migrants brought it from the Rhineland to southern Germany. In some cases, it could also be brought to various German-speaking provinces from medieval southern France where it was also found (Gross 2897:709, Seror 1989:57-58, Adler 1907:3) due to earlier migrations of Jews from Italy to that area.
In Germany, the full form never appears in Christian sources after the 11th century. On the other hand, since the early 13th century there are numerous references to derived forms of Caleman (Kaleman) and Calman (Kalman). Jews used them as the vernacular equivalents(kinnuim) for Kalonimos. The use of the phonetic variants of Kalonimos seems to have been completely reduced to religious life, being absent from the vernacular. Zunz (1876:26) suggested that the association between Kal(e)man and Kalonimos was purely phonetic. That idea is unattractive - a genetic association between the two names is much more plausible. Several hypotheses were suggested to explain the derivation of Kal(e)man from Kalonimos/Kalonimus. Fischer (1938:159) stated that it resulted from the confusion between the two nasals, /n/ and /m/. Despite the fact that such phonetic phenomenon actually took place at that period, this hypothesis is not satisfactory since it does not provide any explanation for the transposition of the two consonants. Gold (1977:99) proposed metathesis - the concept in linguistics to designate the permutation between two phonemes that take place in a specific context. However, he never explained the uniqueness of that particular phonetic context. Moreover, both the above hypotheses do not explain the transformation of the vowel present between these two nasals to /a/. Most likely, Kal(e)man was obtained by the addition of the element -man to the truncated stem of Kalonimos (Wexler 1992:91).
Jewish migrants from Germany brought the forms Kalman and Kalmen to the Slavic countries. During the 15th - 16th centuries, Christian sources regularly mention Jewish bearers of the appellation Colman or Kolman. Since these occurrences are numerous, it is likely Jews used the form Kolman among themselves. That variant of Kalman could have been influenced by the existence of the Germanic name Coloman used by German Christians since the 9th century (Förstemann 1900:1088, Necrologia Germaniae 1:40, 75).



And in Hebrew:

From Machzor Hamefurash on Yom Kippur:

רבינו משולם בן רבינו קלונימוס - מגדולי חכמי אשכנז בשנת ד"א תש"ן לערך. אביו רבינו קלונימוס היה מגדולי חכמי אשכנז (על תולדותיו ראה להלן). רש"י בזבחים דף מ"ה אף מזכיר הערה שאמר בעת מתתו, ומכנהו בשם רבי משולם גאון ב"ר קלונימוס. (אך יש לציין שבתוספות זבחים דף קט כתבו דבר זה בשם רבי קלונימוס אביו). תשובות ממנו בעניני הלכה מפוזרים הרבה בספרי התשובות שמגאוני דורו. רבינו גרשום בהיתרו לאמירת הפיוטים באמצע התפלה (שבלי הלקט סימן כח) מסתמך עליו ועל אביו, וכה הוא כותב: "וגם יש לנו ללמוד מן הפייטנים הראשונים, שהיו חכמים גדולים... וגם רבינו קלונימוס זצ"ל שחכם גדול היה... ורבי משולם בנו ידענו שחכם גדול היה, ופייט קרובה לצום כיפור, ובתוך הברכה אמר ענינים הרבה, ובסוף סמוך לחתימה הזכיר מעין הברכה".
בספר חסידים סימן תר"ז מביא שבמקום אחד הורגלו לומר את פיוטו של רבי משולם, ואחד אמר קרוב"ץ אחד ומת בתוך ל' יום. מכל הדברים הללו למדים אנו על גדולתו של רבינו משולם. הפיוטים שלפנינו הם הפיוטים על כל שחרית והם המוזכרים לעיל בתשובתו של רבינו גרשם.


רבינו קלונימוס ב"ר משה - מגדולי חכמי אשכנז, בשנות ד"א ת"ש לערך. יחוסו מוזכר בש"ס מהרש"ל (סימן כט): "וכל החסידים הקדושים הללו ( - רבי יהודה החסיד ומשפחתו) יצאו מזרעו של רבי משולם הגדול בן רבינו קלונימוס בן רבי משה הזקן... ורבינו משה הזקן הוא אשר יסד את אימת נוראותיך". משפחת קלונימוס זו האירה את עיניהם ולבם של ישראל כגדולי הדור, וכן כתבו התוספות (מנחות קט, ב בד"ה "בתחילה") על רבי קלונימוס זה: "ורבינו קלונימוס אביו של רבי משולם הגיה כלשון שני בשעת פטירתו... ושלשה דברים הגיה כמפי נבואה בשעת פטירתו זאת ועוד אחרת"... גם רבינו גרשם מאור הגולה בשעה שהוא רוצה להביא ראיה על ההיתר להפסיק בפיוטים באמצע התפלה הריהו כותב: "וגם יש לנו ללמוד מן הפייטים הראשונים שהיו חכמים גדולים... וגם רבי קלונימוס זצ"ל שחכם גדול היה ופייט קרובות לכל הרגלים והזכיר בם אגדה וענינים הרבה" (שבלי הלקט סימן כח). פיוטיו שלפנינו הם ה"רהיטין" לאחר קדושה של שחרית. ומיוסדים על הפסוק "מי לא יראך מלך הגוים וגו'". על שייכותו של פיוט זה לרבינו קלונימוס אנו למדים מתוך דברי הרא"ש בפירושו למסכת מדות פ"א מ"ג, אשר מביא גם פירוש לפיוטו זה של רבי קלונימוס: "טדי לשון גובה.. וזהו שיסד רבנא קלונימוס בפיוט: טפסרי טוהר בטעם יטידוך". (ועיי"ש בפיוט מה שהבאנו מגדולי המפרשים).


רבינו שמואל החסיד ב"ר קלונימוס - נולד בערך בשנת ד"א תתע"ה. היה מופלג מאוד בקדושה וטהרה עד כדי כי גדולי דורו כתבו עליו: "החסיד הקדוש והנביא" (שו"ת מהרש"ל סימן כ"ט), חיבר פירושים רבים על סידור התפילה, על הש"ס, וכן חיבר גם כן פיוטים, אך רוב דבריו נשאר בתב יד. אחד מתלמידיו היה הראבי"ה אשר מביא שמועות משמו (ראה מטה משה סימן תת"א: "שמעתי ממורינו רבי שמואל החסיד אשר תיבות אבינו מלכנו הינה כמנין עקיבה יסדה"). חיבר כפי הנראה את חלקו הגדול של שיר היחוד כפי המובא בספר "הנצחון" לר' ליפמאן מילהויזן (סימן של"ג) "ובשיר השירים שחיבר רבינו שמואל". וכן נקט הרו"ה על פי חתימתו בשיר ליום רביעי: "שדי מאורי מלכי ואלי".
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Cheers,

Gershon S. Lehrer
gershon.lehrer@...
www.gershon-lehrer.be
Antwerp, Belgium
 
Searching: DORF, FISZLOWICZ, GERSTNER, KALLECH, TIMBERG (and ETSIONI),
LEHRER, PA(C)KTER, PAKTOR, S(Y)(I)LBERBERG.

btkerman@...
 

Kalonimus is a first name that is paired with the slightly more common name Kalman. I don't know the origin of either name but  even if  they originally came about in connection with a certain family I don't think their use  is connected to any surname or family. I wouldn't read much into it in terms  of families.

Judi Gyory Missel
 

My 3x great grandfather was Kalonymous Tzvi. He was born in 1793 in what is now Slovakia. However when he lived in Galgocz,  it was part of Hungary in the early 1800's. The Hungarians seem to have regularly used multiple names depending on the purpose - civil, government, or religious. So my Kalonymous Tzvi was also known as Kalman and Salamon.
Judi

Karen Lukeman
 

The patriarch of my family, as far as I could go back, was Kalman Kalmamowitz in Lyubcha Russia (later Poland and now Belarus)...near minsj and Vilna. There have been several Kalman Kalmamowitz's since, one being my uncle who changed his name to Calvin Calmon prior to going to Dartmouth College, probably to anglicize his name. My tree is on Geni (but started it on My Heritage). I did the 23andme and FTDNA DNA tests, and uploaded my data to Gedmatch and MyHeritage. My sister Nadine did the Ancestry  DNA test. 

Karen Calmon Lukeman

lehrer
 

Hello,

I assume that your surname Kalmanowitz is thanks to the fact that another patriarch (higher up the tree), was also a Kalman. This could mean that Kalman Kalmanowitz was one of more (or many?) Kalmans in your family.

Gershon

Op wo 11 dec. 2019 om 17:39 schreef <Karen_Lukeman@...>:

The patriarch of my family, as far as I could go back, was Kalman Kalmamowitz in Lyubcha Russia (later Poland and now Belarus)...near minsj and Vilna. There have been several Kalman Kalmamowitz's since, one being my uncle who changed his name to Calvin Calmon prior to going to Dartmouth College, probably to anglicize his name. My tree is on Geni (but started it on My Heritage). I did the 23andme and FTDNA DNA tests, and uploaded my data to Gedmatch and MyHeritage. My sister Nadine did the Ancestry  DNA test. 

Karen Calmon Lukeman


--
Gershon S. Lehrer
E-mail: Gershon.Lehrer@...


CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email message and any accompanying data are confidential, and intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that the dissemination, distribution, and or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you receive this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), please notify the sender at the email address above, delete this email from your computer, and destroy any copies in any form immediately.

--
Gershon S. Lehrer
gershon.lehrer@...
www.gershon-lehrer.be
Antwerp, Belgium
 
Searching: DORF, FISZLOWICZ, GERSTNER, KALLECH, TIMBERG (and ETSIONI),
LEHRER, PA(C)KTER, PAKTOR, S(Y)(I)LBERBERG.

Karen Lukeman
 

Hi Gershon,

Thanks so much for your email....I was hoping that your would write. I don't have access to my computer but I think that I have this right. My great-great-grandfather born in 1790 was Kalmon Kalmamowitz. His grandson (my dad's uncle) was also Kalmon Kalmamowitz. In addition, my uncle was named Kalmon Kalmamowitz (and subsequently changed his name to Calvin Calmon.

We are somehow related to the famous Rabbi Abraham Kalmamowitz, but I haven't been able to figure it out yet.

There are also several sons named Samuel among my ancestors.

Where was your family from?

Best regards,

Karen Calmon Lukeman


From: Gershon S. Lehrer <gershon.lehrer@...>
Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2019 11:53:22 AM
To: Karen_Lukeman@... <Karen_Lukeman@...>
Cc: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Kalonymus
 
Hello,

I assume that your surname Kalmanowitz is thanks to the fact that another patriarch (higher up the tree), was also a Kalman. This could mean that Kalman Kalmanowitz was one of more (or many?) Kalmans in your family.

Gershon

Op wo 11 dec. 2019 om 17:39 schreef <Karen_Lukeman@...>:
The patriarch of my family, as far as I could go back, was Kalman Kalmamowitz in Lyubcha Russia (later Poland and now Belarus)...near minsj and Vilna. There have been several Kalman Kalmamowitz's since, one being my uncle who changed his name to Calvin Calmon prior to going to Dartmouth College, probably to anglicize his name. My tree is on Geni (but started it on My Heritage). I did the 23andme and FTDNA DNA tests, and uploaded my data to Gedmatch and MyHeritage. My sister Nadine did the Ancestry  DNA test. 

Karen Calmon Lukeman


--
Gershon S. Lehrer
E-mail: Gershon.Lehrer@...


CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE: This email message and any accompanying data are confidential, and intended only for the named recipient(s). If you are not the intended recipient(s), you are hereby notified that the dissemination, distribution, and or copying of this message is strictly prohibited. If you receive this message in error, or are not the named recipient(s), please notify the sender at the email address above, delete this email from your computer, and destroy any copies in any form immediately.