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more information needed Re: Hessen Jews prior 1700 #germany

Corinna Woehrl
 

Hello Peter,

first of all we need to know where you located the family and what sources you have already evaluated. Which literature (also German?) have you analysed?
Have you located the family with online resources or also archival documents? Have you consulted local historical groups?
With this information fellow researchers may work on possible further research strategies.

But please note: In German genealogy (not only for families of Jewish faith) the 'Thirty Years' War' (Dreissigjaehriger Krieg 1618 - 1648) leads to a brick wall for many branches of family-trees as not many documents survived this time.

Regards from Germany

Corinna

ירוחם צבי קינסטליך
 


-
HELLO CORINA.WHRE WE CAN SEE THE FAMILIES FROM HESSEN 

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

As Corinna said, it is very difficult to find sources before
1700, even for German fmilies.

In addition, the Hessian region before 1800 is a patchwork
of many individual independent territories. For the time
before 1700 it must be determined who had which rights in
the individual places. Only then there is a chance to find
an archive where documents may be found. Then the search
starts, where this archive has remained and whether it
survived the Second World War unscathed.

In Hesse there is an institution called "Kommission für die
Geschichte der Juden in Hessen", which researches the
history and has issued some publications:
<https://kgj-hessen.de/home-en.html>

Ernst-Peter Winter, Münster (Hessen)

Peter Heilbrunn
 

Dear Herr Winter,

Thank you for your advice. I will follow up with the KGJ. My Heilbrunn family's ancestral village is Frickhofen where I can trace them back to 1780. Before that an ancestor may have lived in Emerichenhain though for how long I don't know.

Peter Heilbrunn

Corinna Woehrl
 

Hello,

you won't be just able to see families. If you know the region or even better a specific town, a good start is searching the documents of Jewish communities in Hessen via the following link of the Hesse State Archives, quite a few documents are accessible online:
https://arcinsys.hessen.de/arcinsys/start.action?oldNodeid=

Another helpful source is the compilation of name-adoption-lists which can be accessed via
https://www.a-h-b.de/en/projects/genealogy/name-adoption-lists

And throughout Germany research via FamilySearch is a good start. Jewish birth-marriage-death-records are often to be found with the search-term "Matrikel" combined with the name of the city or village. But you will mostly need to be able to read German Script (at least basics) and persistence to be succesful.

Good luck, Corinna