My Hebrew Name #names


willa07079@...
 

Both my parents are deceased. How can I research my Hebrew name?
Willa Lewis


Shlomo Katz
 

Here are some possibilities:
1. If your parents belonged to a synagogue, it may have records--not necessarily a record of your birth, but even membership records may list names of children.
2. If you are named after a deceased relative, try to locate that person's tombstone.
3. If you have living older relatives, perhaps they remember.
PLEASE NOTE: Even if you find an answer through this or other methods, if you are seeking this information for a religious purpose such as getting married or divorced, you must inform the officiating rabbi that you are not certain what your name is and tell him how you came to the conclusion that you came to. He will then decide whether to rely on your research for the religious purpose.
Good luck,

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring MD


Feige Stern
 

Willa,
Do you know who you are named for?  That may provide a clue.
Here are a couple of ideas for you:
If you live in the US and your parents, grandparents or great grandparents immigrated here, try looking for their passenger arrival record.  It's possible they used their Hebrew name when they immigrated. 
I don't know where you are on your genealogical journey, but you may need to construct a family tree that includes birth and death dates.  Jewish people name after the dead, so you need to look for people who died before your birth.
There are no rules, but commonly people choose a Hebrew name that begins with the same letter or sound in Hebrew.
Try checking the Jewishgen given names information.    https://www.jewishgen.org/InfoFiles/GivenNames/
There is a lot of great information there!
Other ideas:
If your family was affiliated with a local synagogue, check there.
Gravestones are a great source of Jewish names.  
If you have death records for people in your family, there should be a funeral home listed.  If you get lucky, the home might be in existence and have records.
Your local historical society may keep records from local synagogues or funeral homes.

Best of luck in your search,

Feige Kauvar Stern
Cleveland, OH


David Harrison
 

Shlomo
Surely you remember the name which was used to call you up for your Bar Mitzva?  Nearly as important, remember that that many Rabbis are female, mine is and has been for nearly 30 years; I know many others.   Just ask your Rabbi without any he, him nor he or she, just your Rabbi.
David Harrison,#
Birmingham, England


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of Shlomo Katz <shlomodkatz@...>
Sent: 06 October 2021 11:45
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] My Hebrew Name #names
 
Here are some possibilities:
1. If your parents belonged to a synagogue, it may have records--not necessarily a record of your birth, but even membership records may list names of children.
2. If you are named after a deceased relative, try to locate that person's tombstone.
3. If you have living older relatives, perhaps they remember.
PLEASE NOTE: Even if you find an answer through this or other methods, if you are seeking this information for a religious purpose such as getting married or divorced, you must inform the officiating rabbi that you are not certain what your name is and tell him how you came to the conclusion that you came to. He will then decide whether to rely on your research for the religious purpose.
Good luck,

Shlomo Katz
Silver Spring MD


willa07079@...
 

To The JewishGen Discussion Group,
Thank you all so very much for your help and guidance in this matter. I was able to find my Hebrew name and my Father's Hebrew name.
I've been asked to do an aliyah at a Bat Mitzvah and now I can give the Rabbi the information I have found thanks to this AWESOME JewishGen Group!!!
With my deep appreciation.
Willa Lewis