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Name change records NYC #austria-czech #galicia #names #records


T R
 

My grandfather changed the family name when they arrived in NYC post Anschluss, 1939.
I contacted the archives in NYC but they weren't helpful. Has anyone successfully found these records,
and if so what was to path to them?
Many thanks in advance.

Tanya Roland

Searching ROSENBERG, ROTHENBERG, SPERLING, ROTH, STEINMANN, Vienna, Przemysł and beyond


Susan&David
 

On 11/2/2020 9:40 AM, T R via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
My grandfather changed the family name when they arrived in NYC post Anschluss, 1939.
I contacted the archives in NYC but they weren't helpful. Has anyone successfully found these records,
and if so what was to path to them?
Many thanks in advance.

Tanya Roland

Searching ROSENBERG, ROTHENBERG, SPERLING, ROTH, STEINMANN, Vienna, Przemysł and beyond


A. E. Jordan
 




-----Original Message-----
From: T R via groups.jewishgen.org 

My grandfather changed the family name when they arrived in NYC post Anschluss, 1939.
I contacted the archives in NYC but they weren't helpful. Has anyone successfully found these records,
and if so what was to path to them?



Most of the immigrants did not bother to go through the legal process of name changes or did it as part of the naturalization. although this one is a little later in timeframe so he might have done a legal name change.

He could have filed with the City and that bureau still functions in Manhattan.  Problem is they have it organized by ledger books by date so you need those clues and the before and after names to really find people, especially if either or both were more frequently used names.

They could also have filed with the court and that is a separate record.

If they were doing a legal name change that required a notice in the newspaper as a paid advertisement.  A lot of those however were placed in the legal newspaper making it harder to find them today.  If you find the name change file there should be a copy of the newspaper notice since the courts required proof it had been done, ie that they were not hiding some debts, etc. You can try a newspaper search just in case they filed with one of the papers that has been digitized.

I would say start with their naturalization file because they might have documented their name change there.

Allan Jordan
New York

_._,_._,_


Charles Sachs
 

I have found an official name change documented on a subsequent passport application


Charles Sachs
Staten Island, NY


Sherri Bobish
 


Tanya,

Did he naturalize?  If so, he may have done the name change during the naturalization process.  Both FamilySearch and Ancestry have good databases of naturalization indices and documents. 

FamilySearch is a free site:  www.familysearch.org  Ancestry is a subscription site, but many public libraries offer free access on their computers, and since Covid, many libraries offer free access to their library card holders on their home computers.

Try searching www.fultonhistory.com which is a free site of old digitized newspapers.  It started with NY papers, but has expanded to other states.  I have found notices of name changes by searching newspapers at that site.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish


ewkent@...
 

Tanya,

As I have said in another thread some time ago, I found evidence of my father's father's name change when looking at his birth certificate at the New York City Municipal Archives (he was born an American citizen in the Brownsville neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York -- so his birth certificate was a New York City certificate) -- information added after the name change  (I believe added using 1 or more hand stamps) was visible in the image of the Certificate.

As I said in that other post, I also found (via Newspapers.com) a legal notice from the Brooklyn Eagle newspaper (my grandfather was still living in Brooklyn at that time) announcing the official name change (although my grandfather seems to have used his original name for at least about 8 years after he got the name change legally approved [Shrug]).

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I agree that if the person in question became a naturalized US citizen, the original name upon arrival should be findable in the naturalization documentation (and in the passenger manifest upon arrival in the US -- if you can find that).

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Good Luck.

Ethan Kent (in New York City)
ewkent@... .


Michael Herzlich
 

For Naturalizations, if you find a Naturalization Petition on Ancestry view the image then look at the immediately preceding images by selecting the left arrow on the left side of the image.  You may have to go back a few images, but sometimes there is a Certificate of Arrival that gives the name the person used when entering the country.
--
Michael Herzlich
Delray Beach, Florida USA

Belarus - EPSTEIN, HELFAND, POLLACK
Galicia (Poland, Ukraine) - HERZLICH, TREIBER


jbonline1111@...
 

My father and his brothers changed their last name to make it easier for business purposes and perhaps to sound more American.  They did not use the courts to do so.  They were all born in the USA, so there were no naturalization papers. It's perfectly legal to do this as long as it is not for fraudulent purposes.  It can cause problems though. Dad had to have his brother's wife swear that she knew him under both names when he applied for Social Security.  
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC