Topics

Name Tocherre #yiddish #names


Marsha Paiste
 


Hello all--

When my great grandmother from Kornitsa brought her children to America in 1895 they came on a ship from Hamburg.  The passenger list employs Yiddish names with unusual, perhaps German, spellings.  For instance Tsiedel became Zeitel. Similar forms of the names also appear on the list of arrivals in NY.

One of the names is hard to read but looks like Therue or Tocherre  which I believe is my great aunt Jennie.  Is Tocherre  a name?  Is it possible that my ggmother said "daughter" or "tochter" and the name on the list  arises from that?  Are there names for Jennie that seem like either of these?

Marsha Starr Paiste
New Hampshire


Minnie Schreck
 

hello, is there a way to find a list of ship names/manifests for arrivals of Yiddish speakers from Russia? My husband's great-grandfather, Israel Divac arrived in 1882 and the 1920 census for Philadelphia listed his spoken language as Yiddish and his origins from Russia. Minnie Schreck


On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 2:58 PM Marsha Paiste <marsha.paiste@...> wrote:

Hello all--

When my great grandmother from Kornitsa brought her children to America in 1895 they came on a ship from Hamburg.  The passenger list employs Yiddish names with unusual, perhaps German, spellings.  For instance Tsiedel became Zeitel. Similar forms of the names also appear on the list of arrivals in NY.

One of the names is hard to read but looks like Therue or Tocherre  which I believe is my great aunt Jennie.  Is Tocherre  a name?  Is it possible that my ggmother said "daughter" or "tochter" and the name on the list  arises from that?  Are there names for Jennie that seem like either of these?

Marsha Starr Paiste
New Hampshire


Sherri Bobish
 


Minnie,

There are databases on-line of incoming passenger manifests for many U.S. ports.

A manifest from 1882 will likely have no other info than a person's name and name of country of origin.  Although, it did vary by shipping line.

Later manifests contain much broader info, as manifest data was mandated by the U.S.

Here are some sites to try searching:

https://stevemorse.org/
A great site with many helpful databases.

www.familysearch.org
A site with a large number of genealogical databases, including passenger manifests.

Regards,

Sherri Bobish
Princeton, NJ


Diane Jacobs
 

Check the 6 volume set Migration from the Russian Empire edited by Ira Glazier.
It lists all passengers by date of arrival,  ship and then lists passengers by name, age and occupation.  I believe it includes
1882 as Vol. 4 is 1888.

I found my great grandparents and grandfather original surname there in 1888 because I knew all their first names and the month of their arrival. 

Hope this helps.

Diane Jacobs
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Minnie Schreck <mmsandfriends@...>
Date: 7/29/20 4:50 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Name Tocherre #names #yiddish

hello, is there a way to find a list of ship names/manifests for arrivals of Yiddish speakers from Russia? My husband's great-grandfather, Israel Divac arrived in 1882 and the 1920 census for Philadelphia listed his spoken language as Yiddish and his origins from Russia. Minnie Schreck

On Wed, Jul 29, 2020 at 2:58 PM Marsha Paiste <marsha.paiste@...> wrote:

Hello all--

When my great grandmother from Kornitsa brought her children to America in 1895 they came on a ship from Hamburg.  The passenger list employs Yiddish names with unusual, perhaps German, spellings.  For instance Tsiedel became Zeitel. Similar forms of the names also appear on the list of arrivals in NY.

One of the names is hard to read but looks like Therue or Tocherre  which I believe is my great aunt Jennie.  Is Tocherre  a name?  Is it possible that my ggmother said "daughter" or "tochter" and the name on the list  arises from that?  Are there names for Jennie that seem like either of these?

Marsha Starr Paiste
New Hampshire


--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey