Topics

Need a translation of word in Hebrew letters in the last will of Salomon SCHLOSS, Mömlingen #germany #yiddish #translation

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

The notarial will of Solomon Schloß, Mömlingen, is accompanied by a sheet in which he addresses himself directly to his children. The text sometimes is understandable only with knowledge of the dialect.

Right at the beginning he uses a word in Hebrew. What is it and what does it mean?

I'm sorry, but I'm not able to upload the file to VieMate - it doesn't accept my email.
Ernst-Peter Winter, Münster, Hessen

The text:
Beilage zu meinem Testament
Da mein irdisches Dasein nicht mehr lange dauert, so befehle ich weider wan ich nicht mehr bei euch bin, habt .... miteinander, das ist der
Grund von allem.
Supplement to my will
Since my earthly existence does not take much longer, I continue to command, when I'm no longer with you, have .... together, that's the reason of everything.

Reply to Ernst-Peter Winter <e.p.winter@...> by private Email or click "reply to sender"

btkerman@...
 

It may be supposed to say "shalom" peace. The spelling is a bit confused though,it  seems  to read שולם instead of שלום. 

asafeig@...
 

I think the word is "Shalom" = Peace (שלום). Only it's written as it heard in a Yiddishe dialect שולם = "Sholem".

Ernst-Peter Winter
 

Thank you to all who have replied to me. I am sure that
Salomon Schloß meant "shalom", in the deeper meaning of the
word. Since often words in the German text are written in
the way they are pronounced in the Franconian dialect of the
Lower Main, some words are not immediately apparent to
German readers too - only speaking loudly leads to
understanding.

I should perhaps have added that the text was written on 12
July 1868. He died the same day. Salomon Schloß left behind
a fortune of over 23,000 guilders. Salomon was married
twice. After his death, the children of the second marriage
acted as the principal heirs, as the father had wished. The
siblings from the first marriage, or, as two were already
dead, their children, received more than they would have
been legally entitled to. One brother, Nathan Schloß, had
died in Richmond, Virginia (unfortunately no further data
available).

Ernst-Peter (Winter), Münster, Hesse