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Newbie looking for a Jewish ancestor in a non Jewish family #unitedkingdom


young4ev@...
 

Hi everyone,

My name is Tanya and I come from a pretty standard non Jewish lineage in London, and S E England, UK.

Recently I spoke with a cousin of my Mum’s, Carol. My Mum was born 1944 and Carol in 1945 so they were very close. Sadly Mum died in 2001 so Carol is the last in my Mum’s paternal family to speak to. 

Carol told me that my G G grandad’s wife was Jewish. I haven’t been able to find anything to prove this. They were married in an Anglican Church in London in 1880. So I’m guessing she converted to Christianity. Would this have meant she was cut her off from her family? The marriage certificate gave her father’s name but I  haven’t been able to find either of them in any searches, including on JewishGen. 

If anyone has any ideas of where I could possibly find any further information on them I would be very grateful as I am now beginning to doubt that she was Jewish at all.

Thank you in advance
Tanya Young 😊 


Jill Whitehead
 

Hi Tanya

What was your ancestor's first and last name before marriage and what was her father's name? Were they born in the UK? Have you tried looking at the UK censuses and BMD records for them?

Jill Whitehead


Jeffrey Herrmann
 

If you have a Jewish 2nd great grandmother and if you have (or have had) your autosomal DNA tested, you would likely find many DNA matches with other people of full or partial Jewish ancestry.  This could provide clues to the identity of your 2nd great grandmother.
Jeffrey Herrmann
London


The Becker's Email
 

Definitely look at UK censuses and birth, marriage death records..  Find her on the 1871 census w/ her parents and siblings.  That will give you where they were born and  keep working back.  If you provide names, ages and place of marriage/residence, someone may take a look for you.
Johanna Becker
Newport, Rhode Island, USA


sjgwed@...
 

If you haven't been to the Jewish Museum of London, it's worth a visit or (nowadays) a look at the website. Over the years, I've been there several times, and have found that most staff members are quite helpful. Good luck!

Susan J. Gordon
New York
ZBARAZ
SKALAT
SICILY 


Eva Lawrence
 

You ask whether you Jewish ancestor would have had to cut all ties with her own family on marrying her Christian ancestor in Church. I have a male ancestor who did this, and while I don't know how many of his Jewish   relatives he remained in contact with, he was a trustee of his Jewish brother's will, and I have no evidence of any formal converson either.  In  19th century England, civil marriages were the exception rather than the rule, and I don't believe that clergymen always asked too many questions of the couple.  You should have the name of your ancestor's father and his occupation on her marriage certificate.  If you only have the indexed version, you can buy a copy of the original record direct from the  Registry Office for about £11 once you can give them the exact details, from the index.
It's  free to register on their website and to fill in their form- don't go via any other genealogy site.     

https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/Login.asp

From her maiden name it may be easier to find out her family's religion.
 
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.


Diane Jacobs
 

My great aunt married a German evangelical in NYC in 1895 in church.
She was always part of the family and I remember meeting her as a young child.
Her husband died in 1917 and she never remarried.  

Diane Jacobs



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Eva Lawrence <eva.lawrence@...>
Date: 11/25/20 4:29 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Newbie looking for a Jewish ancestor in a non Jewish family #unitedkingdom

You ask whether you Jewish ancestor would have had to cut all ties with her own family on marrying her Christian ancestor in Church. I have a male ancestor who did this, and while I don't know how many of his Jewish   relatives he remained in contact with, he was a trustee of his Jewish brother's will, and I have no evidence of any formal converson either.  In  19th century England, civil marriages were the exception rather than the rule, and I don't believe that clergymen always asked too many questions of the couple.  You should have the name of your ancestor's father and his occupation on her marriage certificate.  If you only have the indexed version, you can buy a copy of the original record direct from the  Registry Office for about £11 once you can give them the exact details, from the index.
It's  free to register on their website and to fill in their form- don't go via any other genealogy site.     

https://www.gro.gov.uk/gro/content/certificates/Login.asp

From her maiden name it may be easier to find out her family's religion.
 
--
Eva Lawrence
St Albans, UK.
--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


Jill Whitehead
 

My great grandparents cut off their elder son when he married out - he had to move from Liverpool to Birmingham to start a new life on his own. Bearing in mind their daughter had died in her 20s, this was quire a drastic thing to do. It meant the only child left was the younger son (my grandfather). I know this had lasting impact, as the grandson of the elder son who was cut off feels it to this day. 

Jill Whitehead, Surrey