Polish army soldier #poland #holocaust


Belinda Dishon
 

My great uncle Oysez(Sheye) Jacker/Katz was a soldier in the Polish cavalry during WW2. We have a photo of him in uniform. He was captured by the Nazis and imprisoned in a camp near Lublin. Family were told that he escaped but froze to death in the snow. My questions are: 1. Did the Polish cavalry actually ride horses? 2.Are there any accessible records that would have information about his conscription 3. In which What camp near Lublin would he have been imprisoned? For some reason my the word ‘stalag’ seems to come to mind? If so what number stalag? many suggestions would be most gratefully received. 

thank you
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Belinda Dishon
Melbourne Australia
bdishon1@...
PECZENIK JACKER PRAGER KATZ KURZER


Janet Furba
 

Ask the archives.
Janet Furba,
Germany


Kris Murawski
 

Here is information about the camp for Jewish-Polish POWs in Lublin, 1940-1943. Yes, there were cavalry units in the 1939 Polish-German war.
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Kris Murawski
Raleigh, North Carolina
krismurawski24@...


Kris Murawski
 

Sorry for a wrong link to the Lipowa 7 camp for the Polish-Jewish POWs in Lublin. The correct link is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lipowa_7_camp
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Kris Murawski
Raleigh, North Carolina
krismurawski24@...


Maciej Łopaciński
 


Krzysztof Witaszek
 

Did the Polish cavalry actually ride horses?
 
Of course yes.  But the tactic was that the horses served as the means of the transportation of the soldiers. Before the fighting one lancer was taking horses of two others  and  was moving away to safety.  This soldier  had to poses the capability of riding with three horses at the time. Some tried even with four horses but it was difficult.
Fighting on horses (cavalry charge) was rather  rare  in 1939, it happened couple of times, sometimes with succes.
Of course the picture of the Polish cavalry attacking German tanks with sabres was a myth created by the German propaganda.
Every lancer was armed with a standard rifle and a sabre. 
 
Cavalry was  liked very much by the public.  In the peace time it organized  parades that showed the skills of its men.
One of the stanzas of the popular song from that time went like this:
 
There is no such cottage, no such outhouse
where a lancer would not be loved by a Jewish women.
 
(Nie ma takiej chatki ani przybudówki
gdzie by nie kochały ułana Żydówki)
 
Of course I don't know if it was a true :)
 
On the uniform  maybe you can find the number of the regiment and  the lancer's rank.
 
I wonder if anyone on the Jewish side  remembers  Berek Joselewicz?
  
Krzysztof Witaszek
Lublin


Frank Szmulowicz
 

On Wed, Apr 28, 2021 at 06:01 PM, Krzysztof Witaszek wrote:
I would translate przybudówka as an outbuilding or an add-on, extension. It need not be an outhouse, which connotes a loo. It seems to have been added to the song in order to provide a rhyme for  Żydówki.
Frank Szmulowicz
FrankSzmulowicz@...