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progrom warning #russia


Jane Foss
 

My ggf had a cloth store in Novo georgiusk..shortly before Pesach a customer warned him of a pogrom planned by locals..he emptied out the potato cellar under the house, posted a child as a lookout and when the pogromists were spotted the family fled down the cellar & pulled the trap door shut...the pogromists drank the wine, ate the food, set fire to the house & left..my family sold whatever they had and fled to the US in 1905 jane lowenkron Foss


jbonline1111@...
 

My grandfather reportedly saw his sister raped and murdered during a pogrom when he was a small child.  They lived in Mogilev.  HIs mother did not want to leave home, but she allowed or sent him to emigrate to the USA in 1905 when he was about 12 years old.  His exact age was never known, partly because he lied about his age in order to gain entrance into the country.  I have a 12 year old grandson right now. I cannot imagine sending him across the world never to be seen or spoken with again. I conclude that her love for her son was greater than her self-interest.
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Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


Sally Bruckheimer
 

"I cannot imagine sending him across the world never to be seen or spoken with again. I conclude that her love for her son was greater than her self-interest."

Childhood, it has been said, is a product of 20th century USA. Our ancestors, as young people, were expected to do chores, work jobs, and take care of themselves. One of my ggrandmothers came to the US alone, at age 11, after her mother died and her father remarried. She was marked as '8 and under' on the passenger list, probably a lower price for kids.

And the story of the pogrom repeats. The first of my Russian family to emigrate killed a Cossack who was raping his sister, according to cousins of mine. It was 1867, right around the time of the rebellion / cholera epidemic / famine in Russian Poland.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


jbonline1111@...
 

"Childhood, it has been said, is a product of 20th century USA. Our ancestors, as young people, were expected to do chores, work jobs, and take care of themselves. One of my ggrandmothers came to the US alone, at age 11, after her mother died and her father remarried. She was marked as '8 and under' on the passenger list, probably a lower price for kids." Sally Bruckheimer

Sally misses the point.  My own children were expected to work and do chores from age 2, appropriate to their ages, of course. It's one thing to expect children to work and quite another to send them thousands of miles away knowing they will never be seen again. In the nineteenth century, most extended families still lived near each other and depended on each other. 

While I didn't mention it earlier, it's very obvious to me that my grandfather's behavior as an adult was shaped in part by this early separation from his family.  It is not necessary to go into details.
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Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


@murfisto
 

My mother, who was born and brought up to the age of 16 in the western edge of what is now Belarus, along the Pripit River, told us about watching Cossacks riding through their village on horseback and wielding sabres and chasing down especially women and children to kill with their swords. She even told of seeing one Cossack on a white horse holding his sword high with an infant impaled on it! Her family was saved by their neighbor Orthodox priest who hid her, her mother and 6 siblings in the cellar of his church where they stayed until the priest told them the Cossacks had left town on their way to another village. The priest told her family that the Cossacks bragged that the Tsar had instigated the pogrom!
Murray Stollman
St Pete Beach, FL


Elynn Boss
 

According to my grandmother, in her village of Kublich, all the men were rounded up (including her father) and forced to dig their own graves before being shot to death.  My grandmother and her mother were hidden by a 'goy' (her words), and then snuck out to the village of my grandfather (they were not yet married) of Sobiliefka.  That village was also destroyed by a pogrom.

My grandmother was also chased by Russian soldiers intent on raping her.  She ran faster than them and escaped into the woods.  My grandmother never trusted non-Jews.

Elynn Boss