Topics

Records for Ellis Island deportations #records


Mary Henderson
 

Hi, all!

Are there resources to find information regarding the detention and
deportation of people trying to immigrate through Ellis Island in the
early 1900s?

There is a passenger list for sisters Ettel and Riwke Rand, arriving
in New York, Ellis Island, on Dec. 9, 1907 on the SS Ryndam from
Rotterdam. To the left of their names on the passenger list is
stamped "deported". I'm hoping to find out more about their
deportation. On the second page of the document is a handwritten note
that appears to say "Dr holds" so they may have been ill, but I'd like
to find out any details.

Mary Henderson


Susan&David
 

The Board of Special Inquiry (BSI) page , Ancestry.com image 164 of 165 shows the sisters held for Doctors Certificate on Dec 11, 1907,  with the hold withdrawn on Dec 17, but reinstated, and the deportation order executed on Jan 8 of 1908   The went back aboard the Statendam.  Only a few  BSI hearing records survived.    https://www.uscis.gov/records/genealogy/genealogy-notebook/researching-deportation-records

There is a Holland America Line website  https://stadsarchief.rotterdam.nl/zoek-en-ontdek/passagierslijsten/zoeken-op-passagiers/?mizig=231
that includes both incoming and outgoing passenger lists.   At the bottom of the page you can find a translate button to enable reading  it in English.
You may be able to find them on the return voyage.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

On 11/15/2020 4:49 PM, Mary Henderson wrote:
Hi, all!

Are there resources to find information regarding the detention and
deportation of people trying to immigrate through Ellis Island in the
early 1900s?

There is a passenger list for sisters Ettel and Riwke Rand, arriving
in New York, Ellis Island, on Dec. 9, 1907 on the SS Ryndam from
Rotterdam. To the left of their names on the passenger list is
stamped "deported". I'm hoping to find out more about their
deportation. On the second page of the document is a handwritten note
that appears to say "Dr holds" so they may have been ill, but I'd like
to find out any details.

Mary Henderson


Diane Jacobs
 

Mary,

You need to scroll through these manifest
pages and look at the beginning and the end to see if there are the Detained Manifest and Special Inquiry pages .
Then you can look for the names and possibly see what happened. By using
stevemorse.org and going to the Ships
Lists database  in the first batch of the NY PASSENGER MANIFEST section, this will allow you to scroll thru the pages for your specific arrival by date and ship.

Diane Jacobs 



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Mary Henderson <gengenres@...>
Date: 11/15/20 4:49 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Records for Ellis Island deportations #records

Hi, all!

Are there resources to find information regarding the detention and
deportation of people trying to immigrate through Ellis Island in the
early 1900s?

There is a passenger list for sisters Ettel and Riwke Rand, arriving
in New York, Ellis Island, on Dec. 9, 1907 on the SS Ryndam from
Rotterdam. To the left of their names on the passenger list is
stamped "deported". I'm hoping to find out more about their
deportation. On the second page of the document is a handwritten note
that appears to say "Dr holds" so they may have been ill, but I'd like
to find out any details.

Mary Henderson
--
Diane Jacobs, Somerset, New Jersey


ahcbfc@...
 

My great-grandfather was detained at Ellis Island for 24 hours for medical reasons. That information was found on the ship manifest, not on the general Ellis Island records.
Barbara Cohen


Wendy Griswold
 

Years ago I wrote to Homeland Security (was it INS then?) asking if they had anything on my mother's uncle, who was rejected at Ellis Island in 1906. They referred me to the US archives, and told me exactly what file to ask for, and its location. What I got was a miracle: the record of the hearing on his appeal of deportation. A treasure trove of information. I am told that very few of them survived.

Kind regards,
Wendy Griswold
Jupiter FL.

Seeking: Zurawno: Blitz, Pfeiffer / Feifer

Nowy Sacz area: Einhorn, Wenzelberg, Shifuldrem

Ekaterinoslaw / Dniepro: Dwass


susan.randlakritz@...
 

I don't have any information about searching for those records but my family is RAND/ROND from Lithuania.  I had 2 great-aunts with those names but one emigrated in 1890 and the other was born in Philadelphia in 1902.  Where are these RANDs from originally?

Susan Rand-Lakritz
Kfar Vradim, Israel (originally from Philadelphia, PA)


Mary Henderson
 

Hi, Susan!

This Rand family is from Dabrowa Tarnowska, Austria, now part of
Poland. The earliest I've traced the line to is a Szulim Rand born
about 1860 who married Basche Roth.

Mary Henderson


Marian
 

Mary,
 
I’ve been thinking about your question for a long time, wondering how to answer in a simple way.  This is my long-winded attempt:
 
Several of the replies below have good information that helps.  For example, David stressed the importance of examining the List of Aliens Held for Special Inquiry to look for clues, and includes the caveat that “only a few BSI hearing records survive.”  That is true.  Only cases where the decision of the Board of Special Inquiry was appealed survive.
 
But when I went to look at the BSI List for your Ettel and Riwke Rand, I saw a big clue—a stamp (upside down) saying “HOLD ON APPEAL.”  So there was an appeal in their case.  If that file survives it should be at the National Archives in Washington, DC.  But it cannot be requested without a file number.
 
Another reply came from Wendy, who was able to obtain just such a file from NARA after obtaining information from USCIS.  My guess is USCIS searched their internal index upon Wendy’s request and replied by providing her the file number needed for NARA to locate the file.  But can we find Ettel Rand’s file number without asking USCIS?  In many cases, yes.
 
First, I searched the INS Subject Correspondence index 1906-1957 (T458), now searchable by name on Ancestry.com here.  I searched by name (Rand, R*nd, etc.) and found nothing.  I was unable to search on the cause of exclusion (health condition) because we didn’t know what ailed her/them.  I searched the ship name (RYNDAM, RJINDAM, etc.) and learned the first card for that ship is dated May 1908.  So your Rand case seems to be too early for the INS Subject Index/T458.
 
So second, I searched the INS Name Index ca. 1893-1932, which actually dates ca. 1898-1903 with some as late as 1911.  This index is made of two parts (two indexes, really) and ONE part is digitized and searchable in the NARA online catalog here.  But again, I could not find any reference to Ettel or Riwke Rand.  [The other half/other index is digitized and being indexed by NARA staff, who are working hard.  Perhaps those cards cover the time period you need?  Time will tell.]
 
Not giving up, I went back to the December 1907 RYNDAM passenger list, specifically to the BSI lists at the end, and looked for other passengers who were deported or might have had an appeal.  Usually, if I can find a few other cases from the same ship I can find at least one of those names in the INS Subject Index or the Name Index (both discussed above).  The reason I do so is because all the appeal cases from New York (or any other port) were forwarded in batches (or bunches) to Washington, DC.  In Washington, INS typically assigned all the files in a batch with consecutive numbers.  Thus if I can find another case from that day I can identify a file number very close to the one I seek.  Usually.
 
In this case I could not find any of the names of deported passengers from the RYNDAM.  So I searched for ships before and after, first from the same day, then a day before and day after.  Still no luck.  What I learned is there is a gap in the indices from late 1907 to early 1908.  I do not know why.  I assume the files are there but are not indexed by anything publicly available.
 
There is a good chance USCIS could find the reference in their Master Index and provide you the needed number.  Sadly that means a USCIS Genealogy Program Index Search Request ($65).  If you submit a request to USCIS, include a note or comment that you especially want them to look for “an archives card.”
 
Marian Smith
 
p.s.  I did have one other idea, but it would not provide the needed appeal file number.  Correspondence FROM Ellis Island from 1903 to 1912 survives (tissue copies) at NARA in Washington, DC, catalog record here.  It is filed chronologically with many letters outgoing each day, including the cover letters transmitting appeals to Washington.  The first hearing in Ettel’s case was Dec 11th, something was withdrawn Dec. 17th, and deportation took place Jan 7th.  Searching these would require starting at December 11, 1907 and reading forward (for maybe a week?) looking for the letter naming Ettel Rand.  The letter itself would be boilerplate and, as I said, would not provide the file number needed.  But it would give a good idea of the date when the file was opened in Washington (1 or 2 days after the date of the Ellis Island letter).
 


Susan&David
 

There was good news for Ethel Rand. Upon her return to Rotterdam on the Statendam she quickly re-booked passage to New York on the same ship. She arrived at Ellis Island as Ittel Rand on Feb 6, 1908  The manifest shows her as having been in NY in December, 1907. This time she faced the BSI for LPC.  She was admitted at 1:45 on the same day.

David Rosen
Boston, MA


On 11/20/2020 2:30 PM, Marian via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
Mary,
 
I’ve been thinking about your question for a long time, wondering how to answer in a simple way.  This is my long-winded attempt:
 
Several of the replies below have good information that helps.  For example, David stressed the importance of examining the List of Aliens Held for Special Inquiry to look for clues, and includes the caveat that “only a few BSI hearing records survive.”  That is true.  Only cases where the decision of the Board of Special Inquiry was appealed survive.
 
But when I went to look at the BSI List for your Ettel and Riwke Rand, I saw a big clue—a stamp (upside down) saying “HOLD ON APPEAL.”  So there was an appeal in their case.  If that file survives it should be at the National Archives in Washington, DC.  But it cannot be requested without a file number.
 
Another reply came from Wendy, who was able to obtain just such a file from NARA after obtaining information from USCIS.  My guess is USCIS searched their internal index upon Wendy’s request and replied by providing her the file number needed for NARA to locate the file.  But can we find Ettel Rand’s file number without asking USCIS?  In many cases, yes.
 
First, I searched the INS Subject Correspondence index 1906-1957 (T458), now searchable by name on Ancestry.com here.  I searched by name (Rand, R*nd, etc.) and found nothing.  I was unable to search on the cause of exclusion (health condition) because we didn’t know what ailed her/them.  I searched the ship name (RYNDAM, RJINDAM, etc.) and learned the first card for that ship is dated May 1908.  So your Rand case seems to be too early for the INS Subject Index/T458.
 
So second, I searched the INS Name Index ca. 1893-1932, which actually dates ca. 1898-1903 with some as late as 1911.  This index is made of two parts (two indexes, really) and ONE part is digitized and searchable in the NARA online catalog here.  But again, I could not find any reference to Ettel or Riwke Rand.  [The other half/other index is digitized and being indexed by NARA staff, who are working hard.  Perhaps those cards cover the time period you need?  Time will tell.]
 
Not giving up, I went back to the December 1907 RYNDAM passenger list, specifically to the BSI lists at the end, and looked for other passengers who were deported or might have had an appeal.  Usually, if I can find a few other cases from the same ship I can find at least one of those names in the INS Subject Index or the Name Index (both discussed above).  The reason I do so is because all the appeal cases from New York (or any other port) were forwarded in batches (or bunches) to Washington, DC.  In Washington, INS typically assigned all the files in a batch with consecutive numbers.  Thus if I can find another case from that day I can identify a file number very close to the one I seek.  Usually.
 
In this case I could not find any of the names of deported passengers from the RYNDAM.  So I searched for ships before and after, first from the same day, then a day before and day after.  Still no luck.  What I learned is there is a gap in the indices from late 1907 to early 1908.  I do not know why.  I assume the files are there but are not indexed by anything publicly available.
 
There is a good chance USCIS could find the reference in their Master Index and provide you the needed number.  Sadly that means a USCIS Genealogy Program Index Search Request ($65).  If you submit a request to USCIS, include a note or comment that you especially want them to look for “an archives card.”
 
Marian Smith
 
p.s.  I did have one other idea, but it would not provide the needed appeal file number.  Correspondence FROM Ellis Island from 1903 to 1912 survives (tissue copies) at NARA in Washington, DC, catalog record here.  It is filed chronologically with many letters outgoing each day, including the cover letters transmitting appeals to Washington.  The first hearing in Ettel’s case was Dec 11th, something was withdrawn Dec. 17th, and deportation took place Jan 7th.  Searching these would require starting at December 11, 1907 and reading forward (for maybe a week?) looking for the letter naming Ettel Rand.  The letter itself would be boilerplate and, as I said, would not provide the file number needed.  But it would give a good idea of the date when the file was opened in Washington (1 or 2 days after the date of the Ellis Island letter).
 


Mary Henderson
 

Hi, Marian and group!

Marian - thank you so much for going to such effort, and detailing your efforts for us, regarding the deportation of Ettel and Riwke Rand!  I so appreciate your efforts and also letting the group know what your methodology is.  This has been a really interesting case to work on - I've learned a lot.  One interesting tidbit is that Ettel and Riwke were, of course, both deported, but Ettel Rand turned right around and hopped back on the same ship she was deported on, for it's next trip back to NYC, where she was admitted to the US through Ellis Island.

I was able to get the file numbers for Ettel and Riwke Rand and now have a request in to NARA to see if the records still exist.  I'll keep the group posted on what transpires from my request. 

But here's a golden nugget - I got the file numbers - at no cost! - by emailing the USCIS History Office and Library:

They were super helpful - they sent me the note card on the case with the file number and also told me the Records Group number, and Entry number that would allow NARA to find the records, if they exist.  The person that sent me this said they had had a "discussion" about this in their office, and that they would like me to let them know if I find anything further - so they really took an interest in this - and it really made my day.  So I think the  USCIS History Office and Library can be a really valuable resource, and might help us avoid the high costs of doing a USCIS search, at least perhaps in certain circumstances.  

Mary Henderson


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