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Require help in understanding items on the attached New York marriage certificate #records


lmandlawitz@...
 

I would appreciate help reading the attached 2-part marriage certificate.  The bride's given name appears on both pages, the 2nd signed presumably by her.  She was my 2nd great aunt known as Emma in America.  Can anyone suggest what the two versions on the record might be?  Also, why does an address appear for the Number of Groom's Marriage and what does the Number of Bride's Marriage say?  I am also hoping to find any descendants of Emma (c 1880 - 1954) and her husband Jacob Wagner (c 1873 - 1934).  Both are buried at Baron Hirsch Cemetery in Staten Island. Emma's parents were Salomon Feuerman and Marjem Waldman.  She was born in Zabrid/Zabrougy, Galicia, near Lviv. Their children, all born in NYC, were Mae (1901), Anna (1904), Herman (1906), Martha (1913), and Louis (1916-1999 Los Angeles).

Many thanks for any suggestions.

Lynda Mandlawitz
NYC


Susan&David
 

There are three instances where the bride's name appears. I see it as Scheine twice on the first page, and Szeny on the second page.  If you can get to see the stone in the cemetery you might see Shayna in its original Hebrew.
The name in the bride's marriage number slot appears to be her mother's maiden name, Turopp.
Why is the marriage number slot  filled in with something else?  As details were being entered the slot was thought to be needed to complete  information from above and, in haste, the label on the slot was ignored.

David Rosen
Boston, MA

 

On 9/23/2020 12:04 AM, lmandlawitz via groups.jewishgen.org wrote:
I would appreciate help reading the attached 2-part marriage certificate.  The bride's given name appears on both pages, the 2nd signed presumably by her.  She was my 2nd great aunt known as Emma in America.  Can anyone suggest what the two versions on the record might be?  Also, why does an address appear for the Number of Groom's Marriage and what does the Number of Bride's Marriage say?  I am also hoping to find any descendants of Emma (c 1880 - 1954) and her husband Jacob Wagner (c 1873 - 1934).  Both are buried at Baron Hirsch Cemetery in Staten Island. Emma's parents were Salomon Feuerman and Marjem Waldman.  She was born in Zabrid/Zabrougy, Galicia, near Lviv. Their children, all born in NYC, were Mae (1901), Anna (1904), Herman (1906), Martha (1913), and Louis (1916-1999 Los Angeles).

Many thanks for any suggestions.

Lynda Mandlawitz
NYC


Sally Bruckheimer
 

"The bride's given name appears on both pages, the 2nd signed presumably by her. "

The back was not signed by her, as both signatures are by the same hand.  The front was filled out, by him probably, in a very different hand.
He didn't read English well, and put an address where it asks for number of marriage. 

This isn't rocket science, you could figure it out.  

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Alan Shuchat
 

It's possible that the line next to "Number of Bride's Marriage" is Juropp or even Yuropp, based on the handwriting in the groom's first name (Jacob/Jakob). This comes right below the bride's parents' names. Since there are other lines for residences and birthplaces, perhaps the person writing this meant the parents lived in or came from Europe. 
--
Alan Shuchat
Newton, MA



Kate Dresdner
 

For the bride’s two given names, the given name on the record was likely spoken to the registrar or officiant and is spelled phonetically. The spelling of the given name on the bride’s signatory line was likely to have been written by Emma herself. For further research I would search using the two given names and the American name. This extra work is annoying of course but being through may lead to more records that include more information. 

For the information entered in place of the number of marriages, the recorder was being through. NYC would have had thousands of people that had the exact same names as someone else living in NYC and their parents names would be similar or the same as someone else as well. The groom’s name, Jacob Wagner, is incredibly common. The address of the groom’s parents would aid in separating one Jacob Wagner from another, when the need inevitably arose. The recorder took the extra space to write the addresses of the parents. There is no need to list zero marriages, since they were both listed as single, rather than widowed or divorced. 

Kate Dresdner