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Retrieving German Citizenship

Rochelle Gershenow
 

I am writing for a friend, Rebecca, who is trying to recover the German citizenship that was stripped from her Grandmother by the Nazi citizenship laws.  Rebecca is of Jewish descent on her mother's side.

 

Rebecca has visited Germany and has gotten most of the basic documents. Her Grandmother, Ida Seigheim, was born 6/28/1887 in Georgenheim bei Tamowitz Oberschleisen, Germany to Bertha Berliner (b. 1841 Oppeln Oberschleisen, Germany – now Opole,, Poland) and Eugen Seigheim (b. 1840 Oppeln).  Ida  married Dr Ernst Freudenburg on May 23, 1910 in Munich.  Ernst was the Director of the pediatric hospital In Marburg.  A 1933 law said that any Aryan married to a Non-Aryan could no longer serve as a state employee.  Being  forced to leave his position, the family left Germany in 1938 for Basel after paying the Jewish departure tax. 

 

In 2017, Germany passed a law authorizing the descendants of Germans who were deprived of their citizenship because of religion to apply to have that citizenship reinstated.  Rebecca has been working to prove that her grandmother was in fact a German citizen and that she was Jewish.  Ida’s birth certificate proves that she was a German citizen but does not mention her religion.  Her marriage certificate states her religion as "..braischer".  Apparently the first two letters" He" were cropped in making the copy and the German authorities say that is not enough.  Her grandmother’s parents were both Jewish and were members of the Neue Synagogue in Opplen Germany, now Opole Poland.

 

Any suggestions on how Rebecca can prove that her grandmother was Jewish or on how she can get copies of German documents from Poland.

 

Rochelle Gershenow

Connecticut

 

Michael Sharp
 

Try searching on jri-poland



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Rochelle Gershenow <rpgersh@...>
Date: 19/02/2020 15:59 (GMT+00:00)
To: main@...
Subject: [JewishGen.org] Retrieving German Citizenship

I am writing for a friend, Rebecca, who is trying to recover the German citizenship that was stripped from her Grandmother by the Nazi citizenship laws.  Rebecca is of Jewish descent on her mother's side.

 

Rebecca has visited Germany and has gotten most of the basic documents. Her Grandmother, Ida Seigheim, was born 6/28/1887 in Georgenheim bei Tamowitz Oberschleisen, Germany to Bertha Berliner (b. 1841 Oppeln Oberschleisen, Germany – now Opole,, Poland) and Eugen Seigheim (b. 1840 Oppeln).  Ida  married Dr Ernst Freudenburg on May 23, 1910 in Munich.  Ernst was the Director of the pediatric hospital In Marburg.  A 1933 law said that any Aryan married to a Non-Aryan could no longer serve as a state employee.  Being  forced to leave his position, the family left Germany in 1938 for Basel after paying the Jewish departure tax. 

 

In 2017, Germany passed a law authorizing the descendants of Germans who were deprived of their citizenship because of religion to apply to have that citizenship reinstated.  Rebecca has been working to prove that her grandmother was in fact a German citizen and that she was Jewish.  Ida’s birth certificate proves that she was a German citizen but does not mention her religion.  Her marriage certificate states her religion as "..braischer".  Apparently the first two letters" He" were cropped in making the copy and the German authorities say that is not enough.  Her grandmother’s parents were both Jewish and were members of the Neue Synagogue in Opplen Germany, now Opole Poland.

 

Any suggestions on how Rebecca can prove that her grandmother was Jewish or on how she can get copies of German documents from Poland.

 

Rochelle Gershenow

Connecticut

 

JimG
 

Rochelle,

Members of this UK-based organization have expertise in the practical aspects of German citizenship restoration:

I suggest that Rebecca contact them.
Best of luck,
Jim Gelbort 

Renee Steinig
 

A marriage record on Ancestry shows that Eugen Freudenburg and Ida "Siegheim" married on 31 Juli 1910 in a church in Weinheim (https://tinyurl.com/Siegheim-Freudenburg). Birth dates and parents' names match. If Ida converted before that ceremony, eligibility for restored citizenship might be impacted.

Suggestion: Send your inquiry to the GerSIG discussion group, whose subscribers include some expert researchers -- some based in Germany -- who are not on this list.

Renee

Renee Stern Steinig
Dix Hills NY
genmaven@...

Rochelle Gershenow <rpgersh@...> wrote:

I am writing for a friend, Rebecca, who is trying to recover the German citizenship that was stripped from her Grandmother by the Nazi citizenship laws.  Rebecca is of Jewish descent on her mother's side.

 

Rebecca has visited Germany and has gotten most of the basic documents. Her Grandmother, Ida Seigheim, was born 6/28/1887 in Georgenheim bei Tamowitz Oberschleisen, Germany to Bertha Berliner (b. 1841 Oppeln Oberschleisen, Germany – now Opole, Poland) and Eugen Seigheim (b. 1840 Oppeln). Ida  married Dr Ernst Freudenburg on May 23, 1910 in Munich....