Romania Research Division Update #romania #JewishGenUpdates #announcements #records


Michael Moritz
 

JEWISHGEN ROMANIA UPDATE

Hello from JewishGen’s Romania Research Division! I am writing with several important updates, which I’m excited to share with you all. Please see the attached document (at this link), which covers the following:
  1. Change of Leadership

  2. Significant Correction to Online Records Database - Thousands of “New” Records

  3. The New “Romanian Vital Records Collection”

  4. New and Upcoming Data Uploads

  5. Next Projects

  6. New Website

  7. Get Involved/Donate

  8. Romanian Archives Begins Project to Digitize All Historical Vital Records
  9. Iasi Archives Places Entire List of Births Online (1865 to 1913)


Best,
Michael Moritz (NY)
mmoritz@...
Director, Romania Research Division


Awesome Properties
 

Hi! I am extremely excited to this new update! 
I need advice and assistance regarding a record from Velente Cemetery in Oradea Romania. Where can I find can additional info - last name etc. for the attached record? Or who can I contact for assistance? Thinking this might be my gggfather.  Alexander Zisha FriedmanAny info might lead me past a huge brick wall.
Velente Cemetery serial# 932zone #L stone # 39
Thank you ,
Rachel Malik


Vivian Kahn
 

More information for people buried in the Velente Cemetery or any other cemetery included in JOWBR may be found by searching the Hungary database. Burial records often identify deceased by their Yiddish or Torah names (e.g. Zisha) rather than the Hungarian secular names that may appear in the database. When searching Hungarian records remember that there are often alternate versions of given names. Alexander  could be Aleksander, Sandor, or Sanyi. Moreover, burial records included in JOWBR identify cemeteries by their current location and many towns in Hungary often had German as well as Hungarian names (e.g. Nagyvarad, Grosswardin or Pozsony, Pressburg, Bratislava). Many of those listed in burial records may have been born before the end of World War I, when Hungary lost about two-thirds of its land area so the record is listed under one of the former names. It is also a  good idea to search by entering the Hungarian county or district where the cemetery was located in Any Field.
Vivian Kahn, Santa Rosa, California
JewishGen Hungarian Research Director