Russian Passports #russia


June Genis
 

My grandparents Jacob Morris and Minnie Rivke Genis emigrated to the
US about 1891 according to their naturalization records. In 1901 they
apparently made a visit back to Ukraine (then still Poland I
believe). They must have been traveling on Russian/Polish passports
as my grandfather did not file a Declaration of Intent for US
citizenship until 1918. Is it possible to obtain copies of their
Russian passport or their application for a passport? I have not been
able to find any US arrival records for them in 1891. They emigrated
from Dubno just after marrying. Their Naturalization Petition
indicates that they arrived from Rotterdam, Holland.

June Genis, Hemet CA
--
June Genis, 650--851-5224
Hemet, CA
Researching: GENIS, OKUN, SUSMAN, ETTINGER, KESSLER/CHESLER (Russian/Polish Empires)


pathetiq1@...
 

Hi June, 

I don't think they had any passport. As you write , since they were not American citizens they could not get one. The fact is that  even American citizens were not obliged to have passport in order to travel overseas back then. 

More details about passport applications, 

https://www.archives.gov/research/passport

Moreover, Poland was not a state in the late 19th century so  obviously there are no Polish passports. In 1891, when your grandparents arrived, immigrants needed just a ticket in order to arrive in the US. Therefore I doubt that there is a Russian passport either. 

--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


Jorge Sexer
 

As far as I know, a passport was necessary to leave the Russian Empire. But it was difficult and/or expensive to get, so many chose to pass the frontier illegally.

Jorge Sexer
France


Laurie Sosna
 

My great grandfather Sosna arrived in the U.S. in 1907.
He filed a Declaration of Intention in 1910, but I don't believe he completed the process.
He traveled back to Russia in 1914 to bring two of his children to the U.S. They sailed from Antwerp to New York.
I found their arrival manifest, on page 2 the question "Ever been in the U.S. before?" his is marked yes, with a notation "1907."
I believe he just had to buy a ticket, no other paperwork was needed.

One of my most beloved documents is the Russian passport for my great grandmother Levin.
Fannie immigrated to Montreal in 1911 with her 3 sons and her sister. 
Their names are written in Russian, German and French. It's got all manner of official stamps and signatures.
I often have to remind myself that it was issued when Nicholas II was still in power.

It also reminds me that getting out is very different than going back.

Laurie Sosna
San Francisco, CA
SOSNA: Ivonivka (near Yampil), Mogilev
GOIKHMAN: Rascov, Mogilev
LEVIN: Vilna, Dnipro
KOBB: Ukmerge
FRIEDSON: Ukmerge


David Harrison
 


My understanding, which may be wrong is as follows.  In Czarist Russia the majority of people were serfs, under the sole control of their landlord/master.  They worked for no pay and the internal passport was proof that you were not an escaped serf to be returned to your master.  If you were in a Shtetl you were free of serfdom and needed this document to move about.

Passports have many different limitations; our UK passports until recently included our children and until about 1970 a wife could be included on the passport of a husband.   Until about 1920 a wife was part of a husband and was not mentioned on naturalisation papers although the children were AND if he died first, her nationality was only valid until a year after his death and then reverted, unless she had applied in her right.

Any rule in force at a particular time in a part of North America can easily be different from that elsewhere.

David Harrison
Birmingham, England


From: main@... <main@...> on behalf of pathetiq1@... <pathetiq1@...>
Sent: 24 August 2021 08:57
To: main@... <main@...>
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Russian Passports #russia
 
Hi June, 

I don't think they had any passport. As you write , since they were not American citizens they could not get one. The fact is that  even American citizens were not obliged to have passport in order to travel overseas back then. 

More details about passport applications, 

https://www.archives.gov/research/passport

Moreover, Poland was not a state in the late 19th century so  obviously there are no Polish passports. In 1891, when your grandparents arrived, immigrants needed just a ticket in order to arrive in the US. Therefore I doubt that there is a Russian passport either. 

--
Giannis Daropoulos 

Greece


jbonline1111@...
 

I have a copy of my great-grandfather's Russian passport, which was used about 1905 or so when he came to America with his three youngest children.  He had emigrated to America earlier, about 1897 or 1898, according to other records.  The children, who were relatively young at the time, under 18, are all listed on the passport, which is written in three languages, Russian, German and French, just as someone else mentioned.  While there is no date on the passport as far as I can see, I know they arrived in NYC in 1905. 
--
Barbara Sloan
Conway, SC


mvayser@...
 

Serfdom in Russia was abolished in 1861 for private serfs and 1866 for state serfs.  Both of these were subclasses within the peasant social class.  Vast majority of Jews were part of the meshchane (town dwellers) social class. The discussion here is about 1890's-1900's - 30-40 years after the end of serfdom, which didn't apply to the Jews.
As Giannis mentioned, Poland didn't exist as a state in the 19th century  Ukraine didn't exist as a state either.  Dubno was part of the Volynia governorate between the partition in late 18th century and 1917, when it became part of a short-lived Ukrainian republic.  It was part of Poland only between 1921 and 1939.

Mike Vayser


Barbara Hemmendinger
 

I, too, have an original Russian empire passport from 1905 that belonged to my maternal grandmother.  It is written in Russian, German, and French and was intended for exiting Russia (Riga, Latvia).  My grandmother’s younger sister was also included on this document, which they used on the immigration journey as teenagers to the US. 

Barbara Hemmendinger 
Williamsport, USA
researchibg LOWENSOHN, LOWENBERG, BAHSSIN, BASIN, BASSIN, KOZACHKOV, EHRLICH, ZIBULSKY, SHEFKOWITZ


June Genis
 

Several people have now mentioned that they have copies of Russian Empire passports but no one has said anything about how they might have been acquired. Surely even if they were just simple pieces of paper with lots of stamps on them, someone was in charge of that stamping and presumable had to keep records of their use. Why then do their not seem to be any records of who these people were and what you had to do to get those pieces of paper?
--
June Genis, 650--851-5224
Hemet, CA
Researching: GENIS, OKUN, SUSMAN, ETTINGER, KESSLER/CHESLER (Russian/Polish Empires)