Sending money to Poland in 1880s #poland #usa #general


Roberta Berman
 

How did an immigrant in New York send money to bring family over from Poland, about 1887?

Roberta Berman
Searching LAZNICHI, WAPNIEWICZ from Lomza.


Bruce Drake
 

This is not a "from Point A to Point B" explanation but if it is of any help, here's an example from the the Yizkor book of Svencionys, Lithuania titled "“Fayvl the Mailman.” I've seen other accounts that said the money was sent to the town's rabbi.:

"The great immigration at the end of the nineteenth century scattered thousands of Jewish children across the wide world. In America and in Canada, in Africa and in France, Jewish immigrants were to be found everywhere, but they never forgot where they came from and whom they had left behind in Europe. They sent money home for their parents and for their brothers and sisters, but collecting the money from the post office was very complicated.
When one received the notice from the post office, one had to go to the notary to have one's signature confirmed. Since not everyone could write Russian, they had to go to a 'writer,' and that could cost money. It was a difficult and lengthy process."

Bruce Drake
Silver Spring MD
Jews looked for ways around such problems, and it was decided that it would be best if relatives sent the money directly to Reb Fayvl's address. As a civil servant working in the post office, he was indeed given the money with no problem."


Albert Braunstein
 

When you say that Jews sent money home through the post do you know if they sent cash, or was the money sent in other forms such as Western Union? Today sending cash through the post is discouraged because it can easily go missing.
 
Albert Braunstein
Melbourne, Australia


Diane Katz. SURNAMES/TOWNS: Laske/Ladyzhin;,Steinberg Kiev; Grunberg Rheinhorn/Iasi; Milston/Slutzk; Bicz/Mogilev; Glas/Varniai; Moskowitz/Nagy-Saros Klein/Eperjes; Hefliech/Hungary; Marks/Machester/Suwalki; Shedrofski/Suwalki
 

I  believe the postal service kept records of money orders sent overseas.  I am also trying to track down one of these money orders as it was mentioned in a 1922 newspaper article that my great grandfather received a letter from Russia with stamps worth 10,000 rubles from his brother in law.  The brother in law thanks him for sending him money and reporting that circumstances were terrible back in Russia.  This was in the Bismarck Tribune.  My great grandfather lived in Bismarck, ND.

Does anyone know how best to track down these records?  I joined the National Archives but it's very confusing where to look.
Diane Katz
gdbkatz@...


Frank Schulaner
 

Hesia Diner (remembered her name right?) wrote much on the migration of various peoples in the 19th century. Somewhere in her many works there should be something of use. Good luck.

Frank Schulaner
POB 507
Kealakekua HI 96750 (USA)
fschulaner@...


Sarah L Meyer
 

A bit different time frame, but my Zeidi who immigrated to Chicago in 1913 sent money to his wife in the Warsaw ghetto via American Express.  She received the funds regularly until she, my uncle and mother were allowed to leave when the Germans lifted the siege of Warsaw in 1916.  They then came over on second class tickets (that were paid off over time).
--
Sarah L Meyer
Georgetown TX
ANK(I)ER, BIGOS, KARMELEK, PERLSTADT, STOKFISZ, SZPIL(T)BAUM, Poland
BIRGARDOVSKY, EDELBERG, HITE (CHAIT), PERCHIK Russia (southern Ukraine) and some Latvia or Lithuania
https://www.sarahsgenies.com


Lee Jaffe
 

Since you asked specifically about money for passage to the US, I think it more likely that you’re talking about the sophisticated system of immigrant banks and steamship agents. This allowed someone in the US to deposit funds on behalf of someone back home into a local account. When paid in full, the steamship agency in Europe would be authorized to deliver the tickets. No money crossed the Atlantic. There have been earlier discussions about this system with historical references which you might find interesting. Here’s one …

https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5325/pennhistory.81.2.0226

Lee David Jaffe
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Surnames / Towns:  Jaffe / Suchowola, Poland ; Stein (Sztejnsapir) / Bialystok and Rajgrod, Poland ; Joroff (Jaroff, Zarov) / Chernigov, Ukraine ; Schwartz (Schwarzman?, Schwarzstein?) / ? ;  Koshkin / Snovsk, Ukraine ; Rappoport / ? ; Braun / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland,  Ludwinowski / Wizajny, Suwalki, Poland