Topics

Stillborns #usa #general #names

Corey Brand
 

Hello,

I found that my third great uncle Louis Miller and his wife Mollie Edith Goodman, did have one child, a male stillborn on 21 May 1914 in Los Angeles. The child was not given a name on the birth and death certificates. The child also seems to be buried in a non-Jewish cemetery in Los Angeles. 

In the religion, are Stillborns given names and proper funerals? I was shocked to find out the cemetery wasn’t a Jewish one. Maybe it’s a mistake? 

I haven’t been able to find Louis’ passenger manifests. Seems like the date and/or ship on his Massachusetts naturalization papers weren’t too accurate (1 or 15 Mar 1903, from Hamburg to NYC, on a ship called Deutschland). Something along the lines of Meller was the true last name. I assume he was Leib(a), after his paternal grandfather (he had many cousins named Louis). His grave doesn’t say a Hebrew name, and the Louis and Mollie are buried in a Jewish Cemetery. 

Any incite is appreciated. Thanks,
Corey Brand
Fort Lauderdale, FL

MELLER, MILLER, and many other spelling variations
Family hailed from Krekenava, in modern Lithuania and settled in Boston, Pittsburgh, and Los Angeles. 
Other names in the MILLER family: WEINER, from Kovno (unsure if from city or gubernia); LIBMAN/LIEBMAN, from Panevezys; GOLDBERG from Krakes; SHER from Krekenava. 

Shelley Mitchell
 

The overwhelming amount of stillborns on my tree were given a name. With the exception of stillborns on the ship, many have a grave. But I have to admit, I never had a need to search out their burial sites. In my living US family, again they’ve had a name and a grave.

That’s only my experience. In some circumstances, where the family was very poor, I can envision alternatives. Often the general rule has many exceptions. In NY, there has always been the opportunity to use a Hebrew Society for those burials.
--
Shelley Mitchell 
NYC
searching KONIGSBERG/KINIGSBERG, TERNER, MOLDAUER, SCHONFELD - Kolomyya PLATZ - DELATYN. All Galicia.

William Sklar
 

Coreyabrand@...  asked about names and burials of stillborn children "in the religion"

Under halachic law [jewish law] a baby is named at his bris if he is a boy, or in shul when her father has an Aliyah.  With a still born there is no name.  The child is often buried at the edge of the cemetery without a headstone and the records would only show “Baby Cohen”.    The family may have had a name in mind but that is not the still born’s Jewish name.
 

William L. Sklar .

Steve Stein
 

This is not always strictly the case. The Chevra Kadisha will generally circumcize the deceased baby boy prior to burial (not a bris ceremony). I know of at least one case where a name was put on the death certificate, the name chosen by the family. This will vary from place to place. My case was in postwar Germany.

Steve Stein <steinsteve0608@...>

David Lewin
 

At 02:21 14/05/2020, Steve Stein wrote:
This is not always strictly the case. The Chevra Kadisha will generally circumcize the deceased baby boy prior to burial (not a bris ceremony). I know of at least one case where a name was put on the death certificate, the name chosen by the family. This will vary from place to place. My case was in postwar Germany.

Steve Stein <steinsteve0608@...>

I am working on the late Florence MARMOR 35,000 records of burials in Mokkom Sholom.  Hope to have that done before too long

The data has very many still births.  Where no name had been chosen it is recorded as child of X and Y

David Lewin
London

Barbara Algaze
 

My Mother-in-law had three stillborn sons and one that lived one day.  None of them had names.  The one day old baby is buried in the New York Potters Field.  The others are not.

Nicole Heymans
 

I have combed and indexed a number of records from Posen region, Prussia and stillbirths or deaths within minutes or hours of birth were registered as such, usually without given name; although I have seen given names for stillbirths.

Forget rules, be creative.

Happy hunting,

Nicole Heymans, near Brussels, Belgium

jbonline1111@...
 

FWIW, my aunt, the first child of my maternal grandparents, was stillborn in NYC in 1916 and was not given a name.  As my grandmother was Orthodox, if it had been customary to give a name, I'm sure she would have been given one.  

Another possible Hebrew name for Louis is Eliezer, which was my paternal great-uncle's original name.  He adopted the name Louis after emigrating to this country around 1900 or so. He died in 1916. My father, born in 1917, was named for him and also had the name Louis, Hebrew name Eliezer. 

Barbara Sloan,  Conway, SC    <jbonline1111@...>