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The Given Name Sissel #germany #names


Ralph Baer
 

Al Lederer recently posted the link to the long-awaited Baiersdorf, Bavaria cemetery documentation. This cemetery contains the graves of a number of my ancestors and many other family members on at least four branches of my tree from Baiersdorf and Forchheim. One grave is for Sissel AUB, son of Me’ir. He was apparently a brother of my ancestor Abraham Meyer AUB and a half-brother of my ancestor Simon Meyer AUB, both also buried there.
 
This is the link to Sissel AUB’s stone https://www.juedische-geschichte-baiersdorf.de/public/763 . According to the documentation, he died on March 18, 1814. There was a census of the Jewish community of Baiersdorf in 1796. There is no Sissel AUB listed. However there were two men living with Abraham Meyer AUB who were designated as relatives or servants, Männlein (born about 1746) and Eißig (born about 1748).
 
My question is, could either the name Männlein or Eißig (Isaac) correspond to Sissel?
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Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


rebasolomon
 

When I look at your lInk, the transliteration says SISSEL but the Hebrew letters there would sound more like ZEESIL.  That might be an option to look for. 
Reba Harris Solomon
New York, USA


Reuven Mohr
 

if those are the options, Maennlein and Eissig, I would say Eissig.
I see examples where Sissel is connected to Israel or Elieser, Simon and Josef, and in other cases I would expect at least an 's' in the name. Isak, Seckel, Eissik comply with this rule. But I don't have a historic example for this.

I would connect Maennlein to Emanuel, Menachem, Manasse etc.
 


Ralph Baer
 

> When I look at your lInk, the transliteration says SISSEL but the Hebrew letters there would sound more like ZEESIL.  That might be an option to look for. 
> Reba Harris Solomon
> New York, USA

it is indeed a zayin. It is transliterated to Sissel because it is a German transliteration, not an English transliteration, and in such a situation a German S is pronounced like an English Z. 
--
Ralph N. Baer        RalphNBaer@...       Washington, DC


Sally Bruckheimer
 

I don't think anybody has mentioned that Sissel could also be Süssel, from Sussman, meaning sweet.

Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ


Myrna Waters
 

My ggmother from Galicia was named Suessel.  She had a brother called Sussie aka Salman or Salomon or Samuel.  His name varies on the various birth records of his children.