Travelling from Bessarabia to Argentina #bessarabia


bubala8@...
 

I am trying to find some ancestry information via shipping lists.  However, I do not know where to start.  All I know is that my grandfather’s niece and her husband moved from Bessarabia, then Romania (now Moldova) to Buenos Aires, Argentina.  I presume this was some time after World War I or perhaps just before.  I know the name of her husband (Mordechai Vays) but nothing else.

 

My question is, when leaving Bessarabia to get to Buenos Aires, how would they have travelled, e.g. from which European port?  Would it be from a Spanish port such as Barcelona or Cadiz or could it be from Naples or Marseilles or would they have gone from a location nearer to Bessarabia?

 

I have inherited a family postcard from my grandfather.  On one side is writing which I have tried to get translated with minimal success regarding family details.  On the other side is a photo of the niece, her husband and their daughter.  This appears to have been taken professionally in Buenos Aires in the 1920s, from the clothing that the family are wearing, plus there is a postmark with the words “Buenos Aires” on it.

 

Any information about shipping lines that the family might have taken to reach Argentina at that time would be most appreciated. Thank you.

 

 

Sandra Wasserman

 


kosfiszer8@...
 

The prevalent route would have been through the Black Sea and then the ports on the Mediterranean to South America (Marseille in France, Barcelona in Spain and Genoa in Italy). Having said that I am attaching the immigration to Argentina from a Vays family from the Ukraine that came through Hamburg on the Baltic sea in 1923.

--

Angel Kosfiszer

Richardson, Texas


laura.posternak@...
 

Hello, most of the people who came from this areas depart from the ports of Cherburgo, Hamburg, Amsterdam.
I Searched  Vays In Cemla search engine, but i didn't  find anyone call  Mordejai, but  the way to write de surname can be different in many possibilities  ( WAISS, WEISS,VAIS)
You  can  try in Cemla search engine writing the surname in different ways.
Laura Posternak
Buenos Aires Argentina


rv Kaplan
 

My mother's cousin emigrated from Kamenets-Podolsk, Ukraine, in late 1906 to Argentina via Rotterdam.

Harvey Kaplan

Glasgow, Scotland



On Sun, 7 Aug 2022 at 16:23, <kosfiszer8@...> wrote:
The prevalent route would have been through the Black Sea and then the ports on the Mediterranean to South America (Marseille in France, Barcelona in Spain and Genoa in Italy). Having said that I am attaching the immigration to Argentina from a Vays family from the Ukraine that came through Hamburg on the Baltic sea in 1923.

--

Angel Kosfiszer

Richardson, Texas


John Hoenig
 

There is a website cemla.com that lists the immigrants to Argentina with their age, profession, port of departure, name of ship, and date of arrival. Searching for the surname VAYS gives 7 hits. A Ukrainian family of six that arrived August 15, 1923, from Hamburg and a single individual of nationality Argentina who arrived in 1955. You might want to search that database with alternative spellings of Vays.

John Hoenig
Williamsburg, VA


Yefim Kogan
 

Sandra,  here are some information:

- a good article about  Jewish Immigration to Argentina
https://library.brown.edu/create/modernlatinamerica/chapters/chapter-9-argentina/moments-in-argentine-history/jewish-immigration-to-argentina/

- there are a lot of records online about Jewish Immigration to Argentina, for example: at FamilySearch https://www.familysearch.org/en/wiki/Argentina_Emigration_and_Immigration    or maybe this one will help List of ships arrived to Argentinahttps://www.hebrewsurnames.com/ships
and many others... when search google for "list of ships arrived to buenos aires"

- as far as how Jews in Bessarabia could come to a major ports, like Hamburg in Germany or others, there were several ways, and it all depends on the family abilities.  First of all Kishinev (capital of Bessarabia) was connected with Railways with Europe from end of 19 century, and that probably was the cheapest way to travel.  Also port Odessa was not far (about 100 miles) from Kishinev, and from Odessa ships went to many ports in Europe.

All the best,
Yefim Kogan
Bessarabia SIG Leader and Coordinator



bubala8@...
 

Thank you so much Yefim for the information.  You answered exactly what I was thinking!  I was wondering how the infrastructure in Bessarabia was at the end of the WW1 and the early 1920s to get to a port and/or across Europe.

Sadly I do not know where my grandfather's family came from in Bessarabia or anything else, other than on my grandfather's wedding certificate is the name of his father and the father's occupation (Tailor) so I am groping in the dark.  The only other clue I have is about his neice and nephew-in-law and their postcard from Argentina..

Now at least I have some links, and I thank you for that.

Kind regards,

Sandra Wasserman


ab12cohen@...
 

Unfortunately cemla.com does not seem very comprehensive. I could not find my grandfather's brother who emigrated from Bessarabia to Argentina in about 1906 nor his future wife's family who must have left earlier. They married in Rosario in 1908. Most of the immigrants listed were in the late 1920s.

Alan Cohen


xan madera
 

hi sandra, did you check/ask the argentinian archives of amia ?
https://www.amia.org.ar/ 
or   
www.itangadol.com

i know some Wasserman from Israel and Berlin -:)

saludos
Jan Braunholz-Frankfurt/M


Alan Levitt
 

It seems that a number of families from Bessarabia left for Argentina.
Although my grandfather left for Montreal, at least one of his
relatives also went to Argentina. I am interested in learning why
people from Bessarabia selected Argentina as a destination circa 1906.
Thanks,
Alan Levitt
Chevy Chase, Maryland


mpipik
 

Start with these three links:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Jews_in_Argentina#Historic_Jewish_colonies_in_Argentina
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_de_Hirsch

https://www.timesofisrael.com/how-a-small-pogrom-in-russia-changed-the-course-of-history/

In a nutshell:
The Jews, many from Bessarbia/Moldova, which was/is agrarian, were already going to Argentina by the end of the 19th century as Argentina was looking for people with farming-related skills. As a result Argentina received a large influx of these Jews and Italians who had been displaced from their agricultural lands.

Jessica Schein
NYC


fdbaran@...
 

My great-grandfather left Bessarabia for Brazil (circa 1920) through the port of Genoa. After leaving the port of Rio de Janeiro, the ship continued its voyage to Argentina, as many ships did at that time.

The brazilian National Archives has the passengers lists from almos all of those ships and you can browse them online, but they show only the passengers who disembarked in Rio or São Paulo. 

Flavio Baran
Brasília, Brazil


bubala8@...
 

Thank you for the links Jessica.  I doubt if my ancestors were agricultural people. My great grandfather and my grandfather were both Tailors.  Would have throught they would have come from a town in Bessarabia.  My grandfather's newphew-in-law and his wife moved to Argentina, I would think in the 1920s from the photo I have of them.  Perhaps after WWI, they were looking for a new life in a town, but I could be wrong.


Sandra Wasserman
London, England