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Ukrainian birthplace for one great uncle from Northern Lithuania #lithuania #ukraine

Michele Lock
 

I have been researching the history of the Lak/Lock family of Gruzd/Zagare, Lithuania, near the Latvian border area. All nine siblings in the family, born circa 1885-1905, list Gruzd or nearby towns as their birthplace on various documents, except for one younger brother, born in 1902 and who emigrated in 1923. This brother lists 'Slaviansk' as his birthplace, both on his ship passenger list in 1923, and on his 1942 US draft card.

Could Slaviansk, in the southern Ukraine, be the place where the family was exiled to during WW I? I know that the Jews were forced to leave Lithuania and were deported into inner parts of the Russian empire during this time. I also noticed on the ship manifest that he lists his nationality as Russian, and not Lithuanian. I suspect that he had difficulty getting Lithuanian citizenship, and may have been forced to declare himself a Russian citizen, and then made to declare a Russian birthplace.

Thanks for any input on this.     Michele Lock,  Alexandria, VA

List the surnames/towns that you are researching in the JewishGen Family Finder.
Go to https://www.jewishgen.org/jgff and click on ENTER/MODIFY.

Researching Lak/Lack/Lock from Gruzd/Joniskis/Zagare Lithuania
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Researching Leybman/Lipman/Leapman from Dotnuva Lithuania
Researching Olitsky from Alytus, Lithuania     

Sally Bruckheimer
 

"Could Slaviansk, in the southern Ukraine, be the place where the family was exiled to during WW I?"
 
Anything is possible - my usual reply for most genealogy questions. 
 
I had a cousin Jankel, who came to the US from the hometown, Augustow, now Poland, then Russia, in 1890.  When I got his naturalization papers - the last ones in Niagara County Hall - he was born in Marseilles.
 
Southern France is about as far from NE Poland (today) as you can get. But apparently the parents and other kids went to Marseilles in the rebellion / cholera epidemic / famine of the 1860s. But they also went back to Russia, because he came to the US from there.
 
Sally Bruckheimer
Princeton, NJ

Todd Warnick
 

Funny you mention this. My great-great grandfather was from Odessa - or so we thought - and I just found his US citizenship declaration document from 1913 where he declares that he was born in Kovno (in 1855). No one has ever heard that the family was from Kovno. As Sally wrote, "anything is possible" - and it's also possible that for some unknown reason he was also lying on his declaration!
Todd Warnick
Jerusalem


"Could Slaviansk, in the southern Ukraine, be the place where the family was exiled to during WW I?"
 
Anything is possible - my usual reply for most genealogy questions. 
 
I had a cousin Jankel, who came to the US from the hometown, Augustow, now Poland, then Russia, in 1890.  When I got his naturalization papers - the last ones in Niagara County Hall - he was born in Marseilles.
 
Southern France is about as far from NE Poland (today) as you can get. But apparently the parents and other kids went to Marseilles in the rebellion / cholera epidemic / famine of the 1860s. But they also went back to Russia, because he came to the US from there."
 
Sally Bruckheimer

Michele Lock
 

I should have added some more information. The older siblings and one younger sibling (born in 1905) list their birthplaces at or near Zagare, Lithuania. It doesn't make much sense to me that the son born in 1902 would have been born 700 miles away in southern Ukraine. 

There is an article on JewishGen about the exile of Jews from Lithuania into Russia in 1915, and one of the areas of exile mentioned is the Yekaterinoslav Gubernia in southern Ukraine, where Slaviansk is located.  

In 1920, when the Jews were allowed back into the newly independent Lithuania, this son and two of his brothers (the ones who had not yet left for the US), applied for their internal passports to the Lithuanian government (from records on JewishGen). Once the Lithuanian Archives are open again, I plan on getting copies of these applications, and I imagine there will be more info about where they had spent the preceding 5 years.