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Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna


Max Heffler
 

My mother-in-law’s cousin was married to the Jewish Lord Mayor of Dublin, Robert Briscoe.

 

Max Heffler

 

From: main@... [mailto:main@...] On Behalf Of Mashiach L. Bjorklund via groups.jewishgen.org
Sent: Friday, September 11, 2020 10:25 AM
To: main@...
Subject: Re: [JewishGen.org] Using DNA matches to find Jewish ancestors #dna

 

I wouldn't trust any DNA companies ethnicity estimates. I have tested with 3 different companies and guess what? I have 3 different ethnicity results. That said, your real answers will probably come from traditional genealogical research. Something to keep in mind, Jews have been living (and intermarrying) in Ireland as far back as at least 1079. That's the date of the earliest known written record of Jews in Ireland. But my guess is they go much further back. FYI, the second in command of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) during the Irish rebellion was a Jew. A Jewish lawyer defended the leaders of the rebellion in a British court. Jews have been protected and have had full legal status in Ireland for hundreds of years. One of the oldest continuously operating synagogues in Europe is a couple of blocks from Dublin Castle. Do you get where I am going with this? Having an Irish Jew as an ancestor is just, well, curious, but not completely out of the ordinary. So the next time your in a pub, lift up your pint of Guinness, but instead of saying " sláinte" just say "l'chaim".

Mashiach Bjorklund


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Web sites I manage - Personal home page, Greater Houston Jewish Genealogical Society, Woodside Civic Club, Skala, Ukraine KehilalLink, Joniskelis, Lithuania KehilaLink, and pet volunteer project - Yizkor book project: www.texsys.com/websites.html


Adam Cherson
 

On understanding ethnicity and admixture reports, please see my post Deciphering Ancient Jewish Origins Using Genography

Adam Cherson


ruthkraut@...
 

I am not very skilled at this, but I understand some people have been able to really narrow things down by using dnapainter.com. 

I would also suggest going back to your oldest relatives and asking if they knew about any Jews who had converted to Catholicism stories. 

And of course trying to get in touch with the closest DNA matches...


Judite Orensztajn
 

Some time ago I read a story (in Jewish Gen) about a mistake that occurred in an hospital in USA anda because of this a Jewish and an Irish baby were switched. The story was told by the daughter of the Jewish boy that was educated by the Irish family. Try to find this story.
Shana tovah and gmar chatima tova,
Judite Orensztajn, Givataiym, Israel


Susan&David
 

I did a search on the JewishGen Discussion Group Archives for "Switched at birth"  and found what you may be looking for:

https://strangepilgrimage.wordpress.com/2015/01/22/and-who-wouldve-thought-it-figures/

David Rosen
Boston, MA


On 9/21/2020 6:38 AM, Judite Orensztajn wrote:
Some time ago I read a story (in Jewish Gen) about a mistake that occurred in an hospital in USA anda because of this a Jewish and an Irish baby were switched. The story was told by the daughter of the Jewish boy that was educated by the Irish family. Try to find this story.
Shana tovah and gmar chatima tova,
Judite Orensztajn, Givataiym, Israel


Ellen Slotoroff Zyroff
 

The following article in the Washington Post is likely the story to which you're referring.  Two of the sisters of the five children of the Jewish father and Irish mother were in contact with various of us who are contact people for DNA accounts with DNA matches with their brother, and/or with the sisters.  The sisters, having realized through casual DNA testing of one of them that one of their birth parents was Jewish and realizing that it must have been their father, were trying to track down relatives of the birth family of her siblings and her. It was an amazing story and quite a detective pursuit and I enjoyed trying to help in their quest, by adding my two cents on what they might pursue next to figure out which Fordham hospital male baby born in a certain 10 day period might be their birth father, given that NYC hospital birth records were at the time still sealed for another few years.  


On Monday, September 21, 2020, 05:01:01 AM PDT, Judite Orensztajn <cjoren@...> wrote:


Some time ago I read a story (in Jewish Gen) about a mistake that occurred in an hospital in USA anda because of this a Jewish and an Irish baby were switched. The story was told by the daughter of the Jewish boy that was educated by the Irish family. Try to find this story.
Shana tovah and gmar chatima tova,
Judite Orensztajn, Givataiym, Israel

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ZOLOTOROV (Chernigov, Ukraine; Kiev, Ukraine);
SLOTOROFF (Kiev, Ukraine)
CHARKOVSKY or SHARKOVSKY(Ukraine);
LEVINE (Ukraine and Minsk, Belarus);
GLUSKIN (Ukraine)
LIMON (Berestechko, Volynia, Ukraine)
TESLER (Horochiv, Volynia, Ukraine)
ZYRO (Zabolativ, Ukraine) 
TAU (Zalolativ, Ukraine)
PISTERMAN (Ukraine)
ROTH / ROT (Ataki, Bessarabia, Moldova)
BLAUSTEIN (Chernigov, Ukraine or Minsk, Belarus)


Lin Herz
 

If you want to find the story that Judite mentions above, it was the daughter of the man who was raised Irish, but was really from a Jewish family was on Good Morning America not that long ago and the story was all over the media. Perhaps googling it with "Good Morning America" or something on there will help you find it.

Lin Herz
Palm Bay, Florida


sjgwed@...
 

Maybe 25 years ago, I met a bunch of Scots at a resort in the Caribbean, and they said they were Jews. Apparently, in the late 19th c. when their ancestors from eastern Europe left a European departure point for the US, their boat made a quick stop at a dock in Britain to pick up more passengers. Thinking they had arrived in the US, some Jews disembarked... and stayed!

Susan J Gordon
New York
ZBARAZ - Bialazurker
SKALAT - Schoenhaut, Lempert


jack nathanson
 

The mixing up of babies by institutions might not be all that rare. My mother had black hair and green eyes when I was born, and may have not looked particularly Jewish. In the same maternity ward, there was a Mrs. Johnson, was was not Jewish, but apparently looked more Jewish than my mother did. The Johnson baby and I were both temporarily removed from our mothers, and when the nurses returned us, I was given to Mrs. Johnson, whom the nurses though was Mrs. Nathanson, and the Johnson baby was given to my mother.  Fortunately, our mothers realized that that had the wrong babies from the names on the identification bracelets.

Jack Nathanson


rv Kaplan
 

There have been Jewish communities in Scotland for over 200 years, reaching a peak of around 20,000 in the 1930s-1950s.  Today, there are an estimated 5-6,000, with formal communities in Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and St Andrews/Tayside.

At the time of mass emigration from Europe to the USA in the late 19th/early 20th century, many thousands of Jews transmigrated through Britain.  There was a sophisticated system whereby agents in Eastern Europe sold tickets covering each leg of the journey. This included sailing from eg Libau to maybe Hull, Grimsby or Leith, then travelling by train across to the major ports of Liverpool or Glasgow.  From there, they would board a ship to the USA or wherever.  Many immigrants came to Britain - including Scotland - and stayed here for months or years, then decided to try their luck in the USA, South Africa, Canada, Australia etc.

There's a common immigrant story that unscrupulous crews told the passengers disembarking at the east coast ports in England/Scotland that they had already reached America - but this is now contested by academic research and is mostly an immigration myth.

Harvey Kaplan
Dirrector
Scottish Jewish Archives Centre

     

On Tue, 22 Sep 2020 at 15:11, sjgwed via groups.jewishgen.org <sjgwed=aol.com@...> wrote:
Maybe 25 years ago, I met a bunch of Scots at a resort in the Caribbean, and they said they were Jews. Apparently, in the late 19th c. when their ancestors from eastern Europe left a European departure point for the US, their boat made a quick stop at a dock in Britain to pick up more passengers. Thinking they had arrived in the US, some Jews disembarked... and stayed!

Susan J Gordon
New York
ZBARAZ - Bialazurker
SKALAT - Schoenhaut, Lempert


adina@...
 

Hi Jesse,

Your dad's results definitely point to one fully Ashkenazi grandparent as the most likely possibility. When this is a surprise, usually it's a grandfather. The most likely scenario is also that one of your father's known grandfathers was not his biological grandfather; this is referred to as an MPE (misattributed parentage event). I personally would not trust MorleyDNA because I've heard haplogroups aren't always correct. If possible, I would have your dad do the following:
  • Test at AncestryDNA because they have the largest database. Determine whether you can find matches to all 4 of your father's grandparents.
  • Have you father test at 23andme. They will give you a basic paternal haplogroup, and if the Ashkenazi Jewish grandparent is his maternal grandfather, he very likely will have Ashkenazi painted on his X chromosome. 
  • You may also want to have known relatives test if your results don't yield any conclusive answers.

I say all of this as a professional genetic genealogist who specializes in Jewish DNA cases such as these. I'm also the moderator of the Jewish genetic genealogy group on Facebook.

If you have any questions, please let me know. 

Take care,
Adina Newman
Sharon, MA