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Viewmate Russian translation request #poland #names #translation


Michele Lock
 

I'd like a translation of the following 1883 birth record (male #51, 2nd entry) from Bialystock:

https://www.jewishgen.org/viewmate/viewmateview.asp?key=VM88303

In particular, I'd like to know the name of the father, and also the likely pronunciation of his surname.

For the mother, I'd like to know if her surname is shown, or if it is her patronymic shown.

Thanks.
--

Michele Lock

Lock/Lak/Lok and Kalon in Zagare/Joniskis, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Minsk gub., Belarus


mvayser@...
 

Hi Michele,
The last name is Хитрянский, which corresponds to Khitryanskiy.  Letter "я" is different than letter "а" - a different letter and represents sound, that is close to word "yeah" or "yard" and is frequently transcribed as "ya".
You can use Google Translate to get it to pronounce the name correctly.  The trick is to type "Khitryanskiy" into the English language window on the left side, then select Russian as the translation language.  Then click on the speaker icon on the Russian side.  It pronounces it 2 different ways - normal and slowed down.

Here is a link directly to this translation: https://translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=auto&tl=ru&text=Khitryanskiy

The translation of the record on ViewMate said that the Russian language doesn't have letter H.  I don't know why I keep seeing this on JG, but that's not correct at all. Russian letter X corresponds to English language H, just like Russian letters Л and Д correspond to English language letters L and D, respectively.  It is literally in the record being translated.

Mike Vayser


Michele Lock
 

Thank you for the link to the Google pronounciation tool. That is very useful to listen to, to get a good idea of how the name should be pronounced.

The pronunciation of 'Kh' sounds like a softer version of the Hebrew 'Ch', like in 'Chaim'. Not quite an 'H' to my ears. 


The father in the record Isaac/Itsko immigrated to the US, and his gravestone here says 'Yitzhok bar Yoel'. On the Russian birth record, the other person who responded on Viewmate felt that 'Joel' looked like 'Josel'. I'd be interested in what others think about this.

The first son of Isaac/Itzko was named on his grave Yoel bar Yitzhok, obviously named after the father of Isaac. In English, the first son was called Julius.

In case others are wondering, here in the US this family changed their surname from Chytransky to Citron.
 
-- 
Michele Lock

Lock/Lak/Lok and Kalon in Zagare/Joniskis, Lithuania
Olitsky in Alytus, Suwalki, Poland/Lithuania
Gutman/Goodman in Czestochowa, Poland
Lavine in Trenton, New Jersey and Lida/Minsk gub., Belarus


mvayser@...
 

Michele,
regarding the "kh" sound, I think every language has specific pronunciation, but nonetheless can be represented by the same letter.  Spanish "Jose", Scottish "loch", Chaim, Khytranskiy have a similar enough sound that is definitely pronounced differently by native speakers. Even within English speakers' pronunciation of this sound it varies based on the region - H-dropping, etc.

The transcription of the father's name in Viewmate is accurate, as the name is quite clear to read.  The Latinization of the name from Russian can be done differently, depending on the Latinization standard one chooses to follow.  For example, J in Polish (and some other languages) has a Y sound (yard), not J (as in John).
The father's name is Иосель - Iosel /Yosel (as in Yogurt).  According to Beider's index, this name is YOYSEF, which is different from Isaac/Itzko (ITSKHOK).  Yoel is YOYEL.

Mike Vayser